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Parker Stevenson

ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1987 | JANICE ARKATOV
Anybody who saw last season's crackling TV version of Hugh Whitemore's play "Pack of Lies" knows whodunit. Teri Garr played Helen, the suspected Russian spy; Ellen Burstyn was best friend/neighbor Barbara, who reluctantly allowed her house to be used to monitor--and ultimately facilitate the arrest of--Helen and her husband, Peter. Yet knowing up front that Peter and Helen are indeed guilty doesn't spoil the story. Or so Charles Arthur would tell you.
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NEWS
July 22, 1994 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Popeil Pocket Fisherman. The Vegematic. The Chia Pet. Such absurdities flit across our television screens, rarae aves in the midnight air of the high-num bered channels. They are like quirky relatives, exacting a smile or perhaps a shrug of disbelief. I had always reserved a warm spot in my heart for these freaks of free enterprise. But never had I considered dialing the toll-free number, not once had I felt the urge to place an order. Not until I saw the Flowbee.
NEWS
December 17, 1990 | JEANNINE STEIN
The Scene: Premiere benefit screening and party Thursday for "Look Who's Talking Too," the sequel to last year's Kirstie Alley/John Travolta comedy from Tri-Star that also features the voices of Bruce Willis, Roseanne Barr and Damon Wayans. After the screening at the Cineplex Odeon in Century City, there was a low-key party across the mall at disco palace Twenty/20, where stars and industry types hung out for a couple of hours.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1987 | JANICE ARKATOV
Bad medicine--then and now--sets the stage for Moliere's "The Imaginary Invalid," opening Friday at the Grove Shakespeare Festival. "It was first performed in 1673, under the patronage of Louis XIV," explained director Frank Condon. "It's a farcical comedy, but also biting commentary on the medical profession of the time: their crude, barbarian, torturous methods. "There was a lot of surgery, bleedings, purgings. . . . Sure, there've been remarkable improvements since then.
NEWS
November 23, 1992 | JEANNINE STEIN, TIMES SOCIETY WRITER
Moving, personal stories of despair, frustration, love and hope were the essence of the Alzheimer's Assn. of Los Angeles's benefit dinner Thursday night at the Regent Beverly Wilshire. The event, billed as "A Night at Sardi's," featured selections from the Broadway musical "Guys and Dolls," plus celebrity presenters and honorees. Original caricatures from the famous New York restaurant decorated the ballroom.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1988 | RAY LOYND
No year-end wrap-up can ignore the impact of Del Shores' "Daddy's Dyin' (Who's Got the Will?)." It's the Equity-Waiver success story of the year. "Daddy's Dyin' . . ." is almost a commercial affront to Waiver--the show makes money. The actors have been sharing in the profits every week since the current comedy premiered at Theatre/Theater 10 months ago. Critically, it's also among the 11 superlative productions--of 95--that I reviewed in 1987.
NEWS
December 31, 1995 | N.F. MENDOZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Criminals beware! Nancy Drew and The Hardy Boys are back in business, courtesy of two syndicated shows that are gaining popularity with audiences. Today's Nancy (Tracy Ryan) is a little older than her predecessors. Now she's a 20-year-old criminology student whose best pals are Bess Marvin (Jhene Erwin), who writes a column for an alternative paper, and George Fayne (Joy Tanner), a film student and part-time bike courier. The Hardys are also in their 20s.
NEWS
October 16, 1995 | MARK EHRMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Scene: It must have been dizzying for the throngs of celebrities and industry VIPs who descended on Mann's Chinese Theatre on Thursday night to watch art imitate life imitate art imitate life and so on. The occasion was the premiere of "Get Shorty." The movie, starring John Travolta, Rene Russo and Danny DeVito, is adapted from an Elmore Leonard novel about a gangster who comes to Hollywood to collect a gambling debt and ends up trying make his own story into a movie.
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