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NEWS
January 20, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Parkinson's disease is most often associated with the uncontrolled tremors seen in patients when they try to walk or eat. There's no cure, but some patients say a new exercise therapy has improved their agility. This South Florida Sun Sentinel story explains the routine: "The treatment emphasizes big, repetitive motions and operatic voice exercises to help patients speak louder, correct their posture and walk with agility instead of taking baby steps. " 'I look much different from last year,' said Rabbi Merle Singer, 71, retired from Temple Beth El of Boca Raton.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Viewers of E!'s pre-Golden Globes online red carpet coverage on Sunday may not have caught the channel's on-screen "fun fact" about Michael J. Fox's Parkinson's diagnosis, but the Twittersphere picked up on it and outrage quickly spread. During the lengthy pre-show celebrity interviews, E! flashed a series of celebrity fun facts. But one, regarding "The Michael J. Fox Show" star, struck an awkward note. It informed viewers that Fox had been diagnosed with the degenerative nervous system disorder Parkinson's disease in 1991.
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NEWS
March 4, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Taking ibuprofen regularly may lower the risk of developing Parkinson's disease by about a third, perhaps by reducing the inflammation that is thought to contribute to the onset of the disease, Harvard University researchers reported this week. Surprisingly, however, other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) that also reduce inflammation have no effect on the disease, they reported online in the journal Neurology. Dr. Alberto Ascherio and Dr. Xiang Gao of Harvard's Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and their colleagues studied 98,892 women in the Nurses' Health Study and 37,305 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, two well-established, ongoing programs.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
One of the most touching anecdotes in Linda Ronstadt's new memoir, "Simple Dreams," comes in the moment she told her parents she was skipping out on college to pursue a career in music. "My parents were upset and tried to talk me out of it," she writes in the book, published Sept. 17. "When it became apparent that they couldn't change my mind, my father went into the other room and returned with the Martin acoustic guitar that his father had bought in 1898. "When my father began singing as a young man, my grandfather had given him the instrument and said, ' Ahora que tienes guitarra, nunca tendrás hambre .' ('Now that you own a guitar, you will never be hungry.')
NEWS
August 20, 2010
The Food and Drug Administration on Friday cautioned that it is investigating the possibility that the combination Parkinson's drug Stalevo may increase the risk of heart attack, stroke and death in elderly patients who are taking it. The agency urged patients not to stop taking the drug, but warned them to let their physicians know if the patients have risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Stalevo, sold by Novartis, is a combination of three drugs: carbidopa, levodopa and entacapone.
HEALTH
August 29, 2011 | By Allison Conway, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I sat in an uncomfortable flower-print chair in my neurologist's office. The nurses in the front office were talking to each other about what type of sandwich they would order for lunch. The background was filled with traces of annoying soft-rock music and an overpowering smell of coffee. It was apparent that someone put much effort into creating a calm and relaxing environment, but at the moment it felt as irritating as wearing an itchy sweater in the desert. Hearing the diagnosis — "You have Parkinson's disease.
NEWS
February 9, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
A six-month program of Tai Chi exercises helped people with various stages of Parkinson's disease improve stability, their ability to walk and reduced the frequency of falls. A study released this week in the New England Journal of Medicine compared a six-month tailored Tai Chi program to resistance training and stretching to see which was most effective at improving functional movement, walking and balance for Parkinson's patients. Researchers randomly assigned 195 men and women ages 40 to 85 who were in stages one to four of Parkinson's disease (on a scale of one to five)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2013 | By John Horn
Singer Linda Ronstadt says she has Parkinson's disease and can no longer sing. The 67-year-old musician made the disclosure in an AARP Magazine interview posted online Friday. Ronstadt, an 11-time Grammy winner, said that she was diagnosed with the neurological ailment about eight months ago and "can't sing a note. " PHOTOS: Celebrities by The Times “No one can sing with Parkinson's disease,” Ronstadt said. “No matter how hard you try.” Ronstadt said that she uses poles to help walk and uses a wheelchair when traveling.
NEWS
November 4, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, For the Los Angeles Times
The cause of Parkinson's disease remains unknown, but a recent report identifies pollutants in some urban areas that may increase the risk of getting the disease. The Health Notes blog of the Newport News Daily Press reports on a new analysis that identifies high levels of manganese and copper pollution as potential risk factors for some city dwellers. For example, people living in areas with higher levels of manganese pollution had a 78% greater risk of having Parkinson's than those who didn't, according to the Washington University in St. Louis report . Prior research on Parkinson's disease in rural and farm areas links the disease to private well water and exposure to pesticides.
NEWS
April 12, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Low-intensity walking may help people with Parkinson's disease improve their gait and mobility, a new study finds. The study, presented Tuesday at the American Academy of Neurology's annual meeting in Honolulu, compared three different forms of exercise to see which was most beneficial to men and women with Parkinson's disease, which affects motor control. Researchers randomly assigned 67 people with the disease to one of three programs: a low-intensity treadmill walk for 50 minutes; a high-intensity treadmill walk for 30 minutes; and a weight and stretching regimen that included leg presses, extensions and curls.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Michael J. Fox is back in prime time, big time, on Thursday night with "The Michael J. Fox Show," in which he stars as a local newscaster with Parkinson's. Ahead of that debut, he spent some time with Rolling Stone magazine and shared some "hard-earned bits of wisdom" picked up through his 30 or so years of fame and his 22 years living with Parkinson's. Thirteen years ago, Fox quit his last full-time television gig - "Spin City" - because doctors told him his acting career was over.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Linda Ronstadt, who recently went public with her diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, will appear in Los Angeles next month to talk about her upcoming memoir. Parkinson's has taken away her ability to sing, but she still plans to talk about her book, "Simple Dreams. " Ronstadt will appear at the literary speakers series Writers Bloc in conversation with Patt Morrison. Tickets to the event, which will be held Sept. 24 in Santa Monica, are $25. "Simple Dreams: A Musical Memoir" includes her personal history, stories of her loves and friendships, and the stories behind some of her songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2013 | By John Horn
Linda Ronstadt has disclosed that she is suffering from Parkinson's disease , and that the neurological disorder has left her unable to sing. The 67-year-old musician made the disclosure in an  AARP Magazine interview  posted online Friday. Ronstadt, an 11-time Grammy winner, said that she was diagnosed with the neurological ailment about eight months ago and "can't sing a note. " PHOTOS: Concerts by The Times “No one can sing with Parkinson's disease,” Ronstadt said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2013 | By John Horn
Singer Linda Ronstadt says she has Parkinson's disease and can no longer sing. The 67-year-old musician made the disclosure in an AARP Magazine interview posted online Friday. Ronstadt, an 11-time Grammy winner, said that she was diagnosed with the neurological ailment about eight months ago and "can't sing a note. " PHOTOS: Celebrities by The Times “No one can sing with Parkinson's disease,” Ronstadt said. “No matter how hard you try.” Ronstadt said that she uses poles to help walk and uses a wheelchair when traveling.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2013 | By Liesl Bradner
If you stand on the corner of 4th and Spring streets in downtown, it's possible to view sections of at least 12 buildings designed by John Parkinson: the Los Angeles Theatre Center (formerly Security National Bank), the Title Insurance building and the city's first palatial hotel, the Spanish Renaissance-style Alexandria Hotel, to name a few. Oddly, the architect's name is not widely known, but his landmark structures - Los Angeles City Hall, Union Station, the L.A. Memorial Coliseum and Bullocks Wilshire - have defined the city's skyline since the early 20th century.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
At NBC's Upfront presentation Monday at Radio City Hall in New York City, the beleaguered peacock network was betting big on Michael J. Fox.   In a sign of its importance to the network, "The Michael J. Fox Show" was the first new series to be showcased during Monday's 90-minute presentation and was introduced by NBC Entertainment Chairman Robert Greenblatt. VIDEO: NBC comedy trailers 2013 It stars the much-loved actor -- who was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease in 1998 and left the ABC sitcom "Spin City" in 2000 to spend time with his family and raise awareness of the disease -- as a version of himself: a well-known newscaster afflicted with Parkinson's disease who decides to return to television after several years out of the spotlight.
NEWS
June 7, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Parkinson's disease patients have double the risk of developing potentially lethal melanoma, government researchers reported Tuesday. Researchers have long suspected such a link, but the new study, reported in the journal Neurology, provides the strongest evidence to date. Researchers are at a loss to explain how the link occurs biologically, but they suspect it may be a combination of environmental exposure and genetic predisposition. The association is particularly strange, experts said, because Parkinson's patients, in general, have a below-normal risk of developing most types of cancer.
NEWS
March 11, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
A drug that could halt the progression of Parkinson's disease is successful in mice and is now being evaluated in human patients, researchers reported this week.   The drug is phenylbutyrate, which is already on the market as an orphan drug for treatment of infants with a rare genetic disorder called urea cycle disorder . Research at the University of Colorado School of Medicine shows that the medication turns on a gene that can protect dopamine neurons. It's the destruction of nerve cells that produce dopamine that leads to the stymptoms of Parkinson's disease, such as loss of movement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2013 | By Rebecca Trounson
Mario Machado, a longtime Los Angeles television news anchor and reporter who also played a newsman in a number of films and television shows, has died at a West Hills convalescent facility, said his daughter Michelle. He was 78. Machado, who worked for many years at KCBS-TV Channel 2, its predecessor KNXT and other local stations, died Saturday of complications of pneumonia, his daughter said. He had been ill for some time with Parkinson's disease. Born April 22, 1935, in Shanghai to a Portuguese father and Chinese-Portuguese mother, Machado appeared in such films as “Oh, God!
SPORTS
April 5, 2013 | By Diane Pucin
Lizette Salas heard the cheers in the gallery and the shouts of "Fight On," coming from fans who knew her from her USC days. The 23-year-old from Azusa, who learned golf from her father Ramon, a mechanic at the Azusa Greens Country Club, is in second place, one shot behind leader Inbee Park after two rounds of the Kraft Nabisco Championship at Mission Hills Country Club in Rancho Mirage. Salas shot a four-under-par 68 Friday that gave her a two-day total of six-under 138. Park, born in South Korea and now a resident of Murrieta, had a round of 67 that included six birdies and one bogey to put her at 137. Michelle Wie, who shot a 70 Friday, Paula Creamer, Cristie Kerr and Jessica Korda were part of a nine-way tie for 12th at two under and are the next-highest American golfers behind Salas.
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