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Parkinson S Disease

HEALTH
September 1, 2003 | Dianne Partie Lange
Researchers have suspected that inflammation is involved in Parkinson's disease, and now they've found that regular use of such inflammation-squelching drugs as ibuprofen, indomethacin, naproxen and diflunisa may reduce the risk. Two large groups participating in continuing studies -- the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and the Nurses' Health Study -- answered questionnaires about their health habits and histories every two years.
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NATIONAL
March 31, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A preliminary trial on the safety of a drug for use by those with Parkinson's disease surprised scientists when all five patients in the test showed measurable improvement. The drug, GDNF, eliminated the periods of immobility that had occurred as much as 20% of the time before treatment and reduced or stopped the involuntary movements common to the disease, said Clive N. Svendsen of the University of Wisconsin Madison. The findings are in the online issue of Nature Medicine.
HEALTH
November 4, 2002 | Dianne Partie Lange
In pill form, antioxidants may not do much to prevent Parkinson's disease, new research indicates, but at least one shows promise when eaten in food. When researchers analyzed the food frequency questionnaires and supplement records of more than 100,000 participants in an ongoing health study, they discovered that getting large amounts of antioxidants from pills, even when combined with food sources, didn't help prevent Parkinson's disease.
BOOKS
June 16, 2002 | ABRAHAM VERGHESE, Abraham Verghese is a physician, writer and the author, most recently, of "The Tennis Partner."
In its end stages, Parkinson's disease can reduce its victims to a frozen, rigid, mute, unblinking, locked-in state. In writing about their struggles with this disease, Joel Havemann and Michael J. Fox display the opposite qualities: nimbleness, great passion, hyper-alertness and an awareness of what is meaningful in life--as if the disease has blessed them with special vision and a unique voice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2002 | GARRETT THEROLF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several years ago, a USC Medical School professor showed her class a large depiction of Parkinson's disease. The series of drawings followed something like the evolution of man but in reverse, starting with an upright man and ending with a figure hunched over and shaking. Moses Remedios whispered to a fellow student, "Out of all the awful things we've learned about, this disease is the one I hope I never get." "Famous last words!"
NEWS
September 27, 2001 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Implanting minute electrodes in the brain is the most effective treatment for advanced Parkinson's disease and has fewer side effects than widely used surgeries that destroy brain tissue, an international team reports today. The technology, a kind of brain pacemaker, "can literally restore patients to independent function" when conventional drugs can no longer help them, said Dr. C.
NEWS
August 13, 2001
Patients in clinical studies often feel relief even when they're given placebos--pills that don't contain medications. The cause, doctors think, is the power of the mind to influence the body. But the nature of the mind-body link is unclear. Now scientists at the University of British Columbia have an explanation for why such a strong "placebo effect" occurs in patients with the neurological condition known as Parkinson's disease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2001
As a person with young-onset Parkinson's, I've been feeling like a Ping-Pong ball during this dramatic debate on embryonic stem cell research. It was a relief to see Paul Conrad's cartoon and John Balzar's commentary on July 27, which reached the heart of the matter. What science discovers has its own intrinsic value. It's what we do with the genies when they're let out of the bottle that counts. Fear of change is our natural response. But as a society, we should give ourselves credit for making some good, common-sense choices.
HEALTH
July 9, 2001 | KEVIN CANFIELD, HARTFORD COURANT
If, after 20 years of marriage, Morton and Milly Kondracke didn't have it all, they definitely had most of it: successful careers, two talented daughters, a hard-won victory over (his) alcoholism. But in 1987, a single letter of the alphabet informed them that their lives were about to change forever.
HEALTH
May 28, 2001 | ROSIE MESTEL
My child is nothing if not solicitous. Take this morning, when--as I was about to drive her to school--she suggested I tarry awhile and enjoy a nice cup of coffee while she patiently watched cartoons. That's just the kind of kid she is. It was, as it happens, the start of a drink-themed day.
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