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Parkinsons Disease

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OPINION
September 13, 1998
When Janet Reno speaks, 1 million Americans don't listen: We're too busy watching her hands. If the tremor is bad, we fellow citizens with Parkinson's disease worry that the stress is getting to her, making her medications less effective. We're cheering her on: "Go, Janet! Show the world that people with Parkinson's can handle real work and cope with the daily roller coaster of slow motion versus uncontrollable shakes." Most of us hide our disability on the true assumption that few people understand what Parkinson's is. This is despite the fact that the most recognized man in the world, Muhammad Ali, is standing up for us. After a five-year, quiet, persistent, grass-roots campaign for federal funding, the Udall bill for Parkinson's research was passed last year.
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HEALTH
September 13, 2012 | By Cassandra Willyard
Inside the human skull lies a 3-pound mystery. The brain - a command center composed of tens of billions of branching neurons - controls who we are, what we do and how we feel. "It's the most amazing information structure anybody has ever been able to imagine," says Dr. Walter Koroshetz, deputy director of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke in Bethesda, Md. For centuries, the brain's inner workings remained largely unexplored. But all that is changing.
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NEWS
March 16, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
A small-scale gene therapy trial conducted at seven U.S. medical centers has found that a single infusion of a specialized gene, piggybacked onto a virus and fed directly into the brain, can safely lessen the severity of symptoms and improve response to medication in patients with advanced Parkinson's page NIH" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001762/" target="_blank"> Parkinson's disease . The clinical trial --...
SCIENCE
June 7, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
The Austrian company AFFiRiS A.G. of Vienna said this week it has begun the first-ever clinical trials of a vaccine to treat Parkinson's disease. The study of as many as 32 patients is designed to test the safety and tolerability of the vaccine, called PD01A. Parkinson's is thought to result from the deposit of pathological forms of a protein called alpha-synuclein in the brain, causing the death of cells, particularly in the region known as the substantia nigra. The accumulation of alpha-synuclein disrupts the production of the neurotransmitter dopamine in the brain, impairing movement and causing tremors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A naturally occurring brain hormone possibly could prevent brain cells from being killed by Parkinson's disease, New York researchers reported last week. Researchers at Regeneron Pharmaceuticals in Tarrytown reported in the British journal Nature that the hormone, known as brain-derived neurotrophic factor, or BDNF, appeared to slow degeneration and prevent the death of rat brain cells equivalent to those that die in humans afflicted with Parkinson's.
NEWS
April 7, 1988 | From United Press International
Canadian researchers have pinpointed the part of the brain that appears most damaged by Parkinson's disease and probably offers the best target for an experimental and controversial transplantation operation. Researchers at the Clarke Institute of Psychiatry in Toronto examined the brains of eight patients who died from Parkinson's disease. They found most of the damage appeared to be in a part of the brain known as the putamen.
HEALTH
April 3, 2000 | DENISE HAMILTON
This week we debut Medical Minute, an occasional column providing updates on various medical conditions and research advances. * Parkinson's disease affects 500,000 to 1 million people in the United States, including U.S. Atty. Gen. Janet Reno and actor Michael J. Fox. Although many people associate the disease with advancing age, Parkinson's can strike early. Fox, for instance, was diagnosed in his 30s.
HEALTH
August 29, 2011 | By Allison Conway, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I sat in an uncomfortable flower-print chair in my neurologist's office. The nurses in the front office were talking to each other about what type of sandwich they would order for lunch. The background was filled with traces of annoying soft-rock music and an overpowering smell of coffee. It was apparent that someone put much effort into creating a calm and relaxing environment, but at the moment it felt as irritating as wearing an itchy sweater in the desert. Hearing the diagnosis — "You have Parkinson's disease.
SCIENCE
June 7, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
The Austrian company AFFiRiS A.G. of Vienna said this week it has begun the first-ever clinical trials of a vaccine to treat Parkinson's disease. The study of as many as 32 patients is designed to test the safety and tolerability of the vaccine, called PD01A. Parkinson's is thought to result from the deposit of pathological forms of a protein called alpha-synuclein in the brain, causing the death of cells, particularly in the region known as the substantia nigra. The accumulation of alpha-synuclein disrupts the production of the neurotransmitter dopamine in the brain, impairing movement and causing tremors.
NEWS
March 4, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Taking ibuprofen regularly may lower the risk of developing Parkinson's disease by about a third, perhaps by reducing the inflammation that is thought to contribute to the onset of the disease, Harvard University researchers reported this week. Surprisingly, however, other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) that also reduce inflammation have no effect on the disease, they reported online in the journal Neurology. Dr. Alberto Ascherio and Dr. Xiang Gao of Harvard's Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and their colleagues studied 98,892 women in the Nurses' Health Study and 37,305 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, two well-established, ongoing programs.
SCIENCE
May 15, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Parkinson's disease is a disorder of the brain, but it may be possible to diagnose it at an early stage by examining the bowel, researchers said Tuesday. As new drugs to treatParkinson's are developed, they noted, earlier diagnosis should make it possible to intervene at an earlier stage when the disorder is more susceptible to drugs, thereby prolonging quality of life and lifespan. Parkinson'sis a common neurological disorder that is associated with aging. It is characterized by tremors or shaking, and difficulties with walking, movement and coordination.
HEALTH
August 29, 2011 | By Allison Conway, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I sat in an uncomfortable flower-print chair in my neurologist's office. The nurses in the front office were talking to each other about what type of sandwich they would order for lunch. The background was filled with traces of annoying soft-rock music and an overpowering smell of coffee. It was apparent that someone put much effort into creating a calm and relaxing environment, but at the moment it felt as irritating as wearing an itchy sweater in the desert. Hearing the diagnosis — "You have Parkinson's disease.
NEWS
May 27, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots Blog
California researchers who first established a link between two commonly used pesticides and Parkinson's disease have found a third crop-enhancing chemical -- ziram -- that appears to raise the risk of developing the movement disorder. And they have found that people whose workplaces were close to fields sprayed with these chemicals -- not just those who live nearby -- are at higher risk of developing Parkinson's. In a study published in the European Journal of Epidemiology, a team of researchers led by UCLA neurologist  Dr. Beate Ritz  found that exposures to the trio of pesticides were actually higher in workplaces located near sprayed fields than they were in residences.
NEWS
April 12, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Low-intensity walking may help people with Parkinson's disease improve their gait and mobility, a new study finds. The study, presented Tuesday at the American Academy of Neurology's annual meeting in Honolulu, compared three different forms of exercise to see which was most beneficial to men and women with Parkinson's disease, which affects motor control. Researchers randomly assigned 67 people with the disease to one of three programs: a low-intensity treadmill walk for 50 minutes; a high-intensity treadmill walk for 30 minutes; and a weight and stretching regimen that included leg presses, extensions and curls.
SPORTS
March 23, 2011 | By Mike DiGiovanna
Reporting from Tempe, Ariz. ? When Torii Hunter heard a few days ago that Muhammad Ali would be visiting camp Wednesday, the Angels outfielder got that same feeling of anticipation he had as a kid in late December. "You know how you have to wait to open Christmas presents? That's how I felt," Hunter said. "I couldn't wait. " The clubhouse fell silent when Ali, a Phoenix-area resident, was escorted in by his wife and sister-in-law before the Angels' 8-0 exhibition win over the San Francisco Giants.
NEWS
March 16, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
A small-scale gene therapy trial conducted at seven U.S. medical centers has found that a single infusion of a specialized gene, piggybacked onto a virus and fed directly into the brain, can safely lessen the severity of symptoms and improve response to medication in patients with advanced Parkinson's page NIH" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001762/" target="_blank"> Parkinson's disease . The clinical trial --...
SCIENCE
May 15, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Parkinson's disease is a disorder of the brain, but it may be possible to diagnose it at an early stage by examining the bowel, researchers said Tuesday. As new drugs to treatParkinson's are developed, they noted, earlier diagnosis should make it possible to intervene at an earlier stage when the disorder is more susceptible to drugs, thereby prolonging quality of life and lifespan. Parkinson'sis a common neurological disorder that is associated with aging. It is characterized by tremors or shaking, and difficulties with walking, movement and coordination.
NEWS
May 17, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Dr. Ignacio Navarro Madrazo shows few signs that he has been showered by fame for most of the past 18 months--or that he has been under fire for the last month. He still takes time to shake hands and chat with patients on a Friday morning as he makes his way to a cramped office on the sixth floor of the Specialties Hospital at La Raza Medical Center here, and he still greets visitors cordially, albeit somewhat shyly.
NEWS
March 4, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Taking ibuprofen regularly may lower the risk of developing Parkinson's disease by about a third, perhaps by reducing the inflammation that is thought to contribute to the onset of the disease, Harvard University researchers reported this week. Surprisingly, however, other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) that also reduce inflammation have no effect on the disease, they reported online in the journal Neurology. Dr. Alberto Ascherio and Dr. Xiang Gao of Harvard's Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and their colleagues studied 98,892 women in the Nurses' Health Study and 37,305 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, two well-established, ongoing programs.
OPINION
January 19, 2011 | By Michael Kinsley
The Roman Catholic Church has either a very good or a very bad sense of humor. The Vatican has announced that the late Pope John Paul II will be beatified on May 1. Beatification, which requires church certification of a miracle by the would-be saint, is sort of a halfway house on the way to full sainthood, which takes two miracles. JP2's beatification, if it proceeds as scheduled, will have been the fastest on record ? six years, from death to finish, edging out the previous record holder, Mother Teresa, by just a few days.
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