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Parliamentary Elections

WORLD
December 25, 2011 | By Amro Hassan, Los Angeles Times
  Islamist parties have solidified their lead in Egypt's historic parliamentary elections, capturing about 70% of the seats up for grabs in the second phase of a three-part poll, according to results released Saturday by election officials and preliminary estimates by the parties. The Muslim Brotherhood said it won about 47% of 180 seats in the second round, about the same percentage it took in the first round. The Al Nour party, part of the more religiously conservative Salafi movement, told the Associated Press that it won 20% of the second-round vote, also matching its performance during the first phase in November.
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WORLD
September 13, 2010 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
Two people were killed and about half a dozen others injured in continuing protests Sunday against an American pastor's plan — suspended two days earlier — to burn copies of the Muslim holy book. Violence stemming from the now-defunct threat by a heretofore little-known pastor, Terry Jones, illustrated the depth of outrage inspired in Afghanistan and elsewhere in the Muslim world over his church's declared intent to desecrate the Koran to mark the ninth anniversary of the Sept.
WORLD
October 11, 2010 | By Hashmat Baktash and Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
More than 4,000 complaints have been received about Afghanistan's recent parliamentary elections, and a majority of them have the potential to change the results, the country's election watchdog said Sunday. The Sept. 18 elections were held despite Taliban threats. But Western expectations for free and fair elections have remained relatively low since last year's presidential vote, which saw Hamid Karzai returned to power amid widespread fraud. In that contest, the United Nations-backed Electoral Complaints Commission threw out more than a third of Karzai's votes, marring his reputation at home and abroad.
WORLD
February 26, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - In another blow to Egypt's troubled democratic transition, the main opposition coalition announced Tuesday that it would boycott upcoming parliamentary elections because it didn't trust the Islamic-led government of President Mohamed Morsi to guarantee a fair vote. The decision by the secular and liberal National Salvation Front was widely expected after the nation's highest court ruled this month that provisions in the election law were unconstitutional. The opposition's strategy virtually ensures that Islamists, notably the Muslim Brotherhood and the ultraconservative Nour Party, will dominate the new legislature after the vote, which begins in April.
WORLD
January 23, 2013 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
AMMAN, Jordan - Jordan's parliamentary elections Wednesday crystallized the challenges facing King Abdullah II in his 13th year in power: Can he provide a government that is credible with his restive population and able to tackle the nation's serious economic woes and endemic corruption? At least 56% of the 2.3 million registered voters turned out, the nation's electoral commission said, in what some observers described as an endorsement of Abdullah's reform plans. The turnout topped the 53% for the parliamentary elections in 2010 even though several major parties boycotted the balloting.
WORLD
June 17, 2012 | By Anthee Carassava and Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
ATHENS — Weeks of political paralysis look set to end in Greece with the election of parties that support the country's international bailout agreements, but the question now turns to whether a fragile new government can deal effectively with a tanking economy and popular unrest. The conservative New Democracy party eked out a slim victory in Sunday's parliamentary elections over Syriza, the radical-left group that vowed to ditch Athens' multibillion-dollar rescue deals and the harsh austerity measures they entailed.
WORLD
July 6, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
The Muslim Brotherhood has expelled five of its youth members in a purge signaling that Egypt's most potent political force is unwilling to tolerate dissent within its ranks as it heads toward parliamentary elections in September. The dismissals are an indication that the Brotherhood's ideological and organizational rigidity, which buttressed it against decades of persecution by former President Hosni Mubarak, may be cracking as its young members yearn for wider political and religious freedoms in a new Egypt.
WORLD
September 7, 2010 | By Alexandra Sandels, Los Angeles Times
When Nabeel Rajab saw his picture splashed on the front pages of a state-run newspaper over the weekend as an alleged member of a terrorist network plotting to overthrow the government, he knew it was time to start packing. The prominent Bahraini human rights activist sent his children away and put toothpaste and shampoo into a small bag in anticipation of his arrest. "I've kept the children out of our home for the past four days," he told The Times by telephone on Monday. "I don't want to be beaten in front of them.
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