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Parlor Performances

NEWS
September 29, 1994 | CHRISTINA V. GODBEY
Joe Harnell's musical career began on a high note. Six decades later, the Sherman Oaks pianist and composer is still performing. Friday night he brings his music to Santa Monica for a concert. Harnell will perform a program that includes some of his own compositions as well as those of great American composers such as Cole Porter and Ira Gershwin. Singer Janna Brown will join him for several numbers.
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NEWS
October 16, 1992 | JANICE ARKATOV, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Janice Arkatov writes regularly about theater for The Times
Molly Picon lives--at least if Sandy Kanan has anything to say about it. "I always wanted to play her, but I didn't feel worthy," said the actress, whose UCLA doctoral dissertation became the springboard for her solo show about Picon, "I Sing!," playing Wednesday matinees at the Richard Basehart Playhouse in Woodland Hills. (Concurrently, Sunday matinee performances continue at The Complex in Hollywood through Dec. 13.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1991 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Josh Kornbluth on paper is one thing. Josh Kornbluth in person is another. The paper account of his solo performance, "The Moisture Seekers: A Monologue About Sex," makes it sound like yet another variation on "How I Lost My Virginity." And, in a sense, the live account is just that. But there's a context--which is where and how Kornbluth does his act.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1999
The New Beverly Cinema is serving up a quirky double bill of films by young Texas-born director Wes Anderson--"Bottle Rocket" (1996) and "Rushmore" (1998). "Bottle Rocket" was the director's confident and eccentric debut film about a trio of shambling, guileless friends who become the Candides of crime.
NEWS
February 26, 1993 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Don Heckman writes regularly about music for The Times.
Songwriter Marshall Barer has a simple, to-the-point, and typically tongue-in-cheek way of describing himself. "Just call me the irrepressible, wafer-thin, rapier-keen, Anglo-sexual, psycho-Semitic, almost unbearably gifted Marshall Barer," he says with laugh.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1985 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN
At a certain period in American college life, if you hadn't read one other word of James Joyce, you were likely to have devoured Molly Bloom's long, erotic, stream of consciousness soliloquy in "Ulysses," her night thoughts as she lies beside her sleeping husband Leopold. There was nothing else then to equal it for style or, more important, for sexual candor, in a time when "Tropic of Cancer" was still a black-market import item.
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