Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsParsifal
IN THE NEWS

Parsifal

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1989
So, Sheila Benson can't understand why Indy dallies with a Nazi ice priestess in "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade" (May 28, "Losing Sight of the Reasons for Success"). Writer/executive producer George Lucas' literary allusion here was about as subtle as a poke in the eye. The latest in the "Indiana Jones" series is an updating of the centuries-old legend of Parsifal. Sean Connery plays the analogue to Parsifal's father-figure Amfortas, whose wound in the side can be healed only by the Holy Grail.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2010
Christoph Schlingensief Controversial German theater director Christoph Schlingensief, 49, a controversial German theater director and performance artist, died of lung cancer Saturday. His death was announced by organizers of the Ruhr Triennale cultural festival in Bochum, Germany, where he was scheduled to present his latest production. Often called the enfant terrible of Germany's art world, Schlingensief was notorious for casting neo-Nazi skinheads as actors in a 2001 production of "Hamlet," in which former Israeli prime minister Ariel Sharon was burned in effigy.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2005 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Philharmonic plays most of its concerts three or four times. Los Angeles Opera typically has twice that many performances of its productions. But in any theatrical run, there is no way to know which performance will be best. The theory goes like this: Opening night is a glorified dress rehearsal, so avoid it. Everything comes together about the middle of the run. By the end, the performers are starting to get a bit bored, and it's best, once more, to stay away.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2005 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Philharmonic plays most of its concerts three or four times. Los Angeles Opera typically has twice that many performances of its productions. But in any theatrical run, there is no way to know which performance will be best. The theory goes like this: Opening night is a glorified dress rehearsal, so avoid it. Everything comes together about the middle of the run. By the end, the performers are starting to get a bit bored, and it's best, once more, to stay away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2010
Christoph Schlingensief Controversial German theater director Christoph Schlingensief, 49, a controversial German theater director and performance artist, died of lung cancer Saturday. His death was announced by organizers of the Ruhr Triennale cultural festival in Bochum, Germany, where he was scheduled to present his latest production. Often called the enfant terrible of Germany's art world, Schlingensief was notorious for casting neo-Nazi skinheads as actors in a 2001 production of "Hamlet," in which former Israeli prime minister Ariel Sharon was burned in effigy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
Body sculpture and scenic spectacle unite as metaphysical movement-theater in the repertory of Sankaijuku, the Japanese performance quintet that presented Ushio Amagatsu's "Shijima" at Royce Hall, UCLA, on Wednesday. Amagatsu's scenic environments invariably change the stage into an existential theme park and "Shijima" is no exception: We see an enclosure of high walls made from three levels of granite blocks--each block containing a life-size human fossil.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1987 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
In certain quarters, Edward Elgar's "The Dream of Gerontius" is regarded as something of a national monument. The grandiose oratorio, completed in 1900, may strike a few callous or unchauvinistic souls as a quaint Victorian relic. Nevertheless, as long as there's an England, Elgar's lofty rhetoric--aligned with his meandering Wagnerism and prim piety--will be ardently admired and fiercely defended.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1991 | MARK SWED, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Robert Wilson may have lost "the CIVIL warS"--his global, six-opera cycle that was to have climaxed the Los Angeles Olympic Arts Festival in 1984, had the money for it been raised--but his theatrical vision has hardly been diminished.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1993 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even among opera lovers, Wagner's "Parsifal" has an undeserved reputation of being a pious, marathon bore. Tonight's Metropolitan Opera production (at 8 on KCET-TV Channel 28 and at 7 p.m. on KPBS-TV Channel 15) will do little to change that opinion. For the production, created in 1991 and filmed for broadcast over several days in 1992, conductor James Levine has assembled his favored Wagner team, who gave the Met its new "Tannhauser," "Die Meistersinger" and "Ring" cycle.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1999 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
The Holy Grail--so miraculously made musical in Wagner's last opera, "Parsifal"--can serve as a symbol of truth and beauty for all of us; and that is something we ever more urgently need as we approach the millennium. At least that's the message in the script that Placido Domingo reads, with beguiling sincerity, at the end of Tony Palmer's "Parsifal: The Search for the Grail," tonight at 8 on KCET.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2000 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
"Parsifal" is not so much an opera of ideas--although it has some--as it is an opera that generates them. Wagner's final stage work about the dispirited knights of the Holy Grail who spend their time trying to keep away from the sexually alluring but deadly flower maidens in the castle across the way and who are in desperate need of redemption by an innocent fool is a weird collection of a megalomaniacal composer's obsessions with religion, women, himself and his obsessive need to belong.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1999 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
The Holy Grail--so miraculously made musical in Wagner's last opera, "Parsifal"--can serve as a symbol of truth and beauty for all of us; and that is something we ever more urgently need as we approach the millennium. At least that's the message in the script that Placido Domingo reads, with beguiling sincerity, at the end of Tony Palmer's "Parsifal: The Search for the Grail," tonight at 8 on KCET.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
Body sculpture and scenic spectacle unite as metaphysical movement-theater in the repertory of Sankaijuku, the Japanese performance quintet that presented Ushio Amagatsu's "Shijima" at Royce Hall, UCLA, on Wednesday. Amagatsu's scenic environments invariably change the stage into an existential theme park and "Shijima" is no exception: We see an enclosure of high walls made from three levels of granite blocks--each block containing a life-size human fossil.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1993 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even among opera lovers, Wagner's "Parsifal" has an undeserved reputation of being a pious, marathon bore. Tonight's Metropolitan Opera production (at 8 on KCET-TV Channel 28 and at 7 p.m. on KPBS-TV Channel 15) will do little to change that opinion. For the production, created in 1991 and filmed for broadcast over several days in 1992, conductor James Levine has assembled his favored Wagner team, who gave the Met its new "Tannhauser," "Die Meistersinger" and "Ring" cycle.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1991 | MARK SWED, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Robert Wilson may have lost "the CIVIL warS"--his global, six-opera cycle that was to have climaxed the Los Angeles Olympic Arts Festival in 1984, had the money for it been raised--but his theatrical vision has hardly been diminished.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1989
So, Sheila Benson can't understand why Indy dallies with a Nazi ice priestess in "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade" (May 28, "Losing Sight of the Reasons for Success"). Writer/executive producer George Lucas' literary allusion here was about as subtle as a poke in the eye. The latest in the "Indiana Jones" series is an updating of the centuries-old legend of Parsifal. Sean Connery plays the analogue to Parsifal's father-figure Amfortas, whose wound in the side can be healed only by the Holy Grail.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2000 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
"Parsifal" is not so much an opera of ideas--although it has some--as it is an opera that generates them. Wagner's final stage work about the dispirited knights of the Holy Grail who spend their time trying to keep away from the sexually alluring but deadly flower maidens in the castle across the way and who are in desperate need of redemption by an innocent fool is a weird collection of a megalomaniacal composer's obsessions with religion, women, himself and his obsessive need to belong.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2010
Wagner's own music has made a powerful statement within a film. Some notable examples: 1. "The Great Dictator" (1940). The prelude to Act 1 of "Lohengrin" serves as ironic underscore for a classic scene in Charles Chaplin's political satire in which despotic Adenoid Hynkel bounces a balloon globe around his office. 2. "Humoresque" (1946). Film composer Franz Waxman's fantasy on "Tristan and Isolde," written for violinist Isaac Stern to play off-screen (for John Garfield, as an ambitious violinist who romances a wealthy socialite played by Joan Crawford)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1987 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
In certain quarters, Edward Elgar's "The Dream of Gerontius" is regarded as something of a national monument. The grandiose oratorio, completed in 1900, may strike a few callous or unchauvinistic souls as a quaint Victorian relic. Nevertheless, as long as there's an England, Elgar's lofty rhetoric--aligned with his meandering Wagnerism and prim piety--will be ardently admired and fiercely defended.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|