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Parsons Brinckerhoff

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1985 | Liz Mullen \f7
About 45 residents attended two informal meetings this week to discuss public parking downtown, an issue that has drawn numerous complaints over the years, but that is "perceptual rather than jfactual," according to Terry Galvin, Redevelopment Agency manager. A six-month survey of the parking problems in 12 square blocks of Fullerton was reported, and residents filled out questionnaires.
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NATIONAL
November 23, 2004 | From Associated Press
The company overseeing the construction of the beleaguered Big Dig said Monday that repairs to fix widespread leaks would take months, not years, and denounced public officials for rushing to judgment on the $14.6-billion project. "The Big Dig is safe and sound," Bechtel/Parsons Brinckerhoff, the project manager for the underground highway, said in a statement issued in response to reports of mismanagement and shoddy engineering.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2011 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
A new rail transit team overseen by the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority has subleased space in a prominent downtown Los Angeles office tower. The group working on the proposed Westside subway extension and regional connector through downtown Los Angeles has taken 41,628 square feet of space at 777 S. Figueroa St. in a sublease with insurance broker Marsh USA. The sublease is valued at an annual price of about $1 million, or $24 per square foot, according to real estate brokerage Studley, which represented the tenant in the deal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1999
Unable to resolve their differences, the Pasadena light-rail project's directors decided late Monday to again interview two finalists for the key post of chief executive officer. The board of the Pasadena Metro Blue Line Construction Authority is divided over whether to choose Richard Thorpe, project manager for Salt Lake City's light-rail project, or Charles Stark, construction chief for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2012 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Times Architecture Critic
A team of designers led by HNTB and local firms Michael Maltzan Architecture and AC Martin Partners has won the design competition for a new, $401-million 6th Street bridge over the Los Angeles River, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa announced Friday morning. The existing bridge, built in 1932 and designed, like many of the city's most famous river spans, by city engineer Merrill Butler, is afflicted with a degenerative structural problem known as “concrete cancer” and needs to be replaced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2003 | Deborah Schoch, Times Staff Writer
Plans to expand most of the Long Beach Freeway could require the purchase and demolition of nearly 700 homes and up to 259 businesses, depending on which design is selected by local officials in coming weeks, a consultant's report shows. But some people who live along the 18-mile route say they have never been informed about the mammoth project or how it could affect their neighborhoods.
NEWS
March 1, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY and KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Despite their private engineers' warnings that track brakes were necessary on the Angels Flight cable cars, city redevelopment officials allowed the builders to alter the design in 1995 to eliminate those brakes and other safety features from the funicular system, city records show.
NEWS
October 20, 1994 | DAVID WILLMAN and RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The substitution of wood wedges for metal bracing in 12 miles of Los Angeles subway tunnels under construction was "inappropriate," according to an outside engineering study performed for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. The study, obtained Wednesday night, also concluded that the wedges in tunnels along Hollywood Boulevard failed two months ago mainly because the contractor did not install them properly and did not surround them with concrete or grout material as required.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2000 | ZANTO PEABODY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rep. Brad Sherman on Wednesday announced the next step to loosening knotted traffic at the intersection of the Ventura and San Diego freeways--a $500,000 federally funded engineering study of three construction options. Sherman, a Democrat from Sherman Oaks, said engineers with Parsons, Brinckerhoff, Quaid and Douglas will narrow three gridlock-easing options to one. They will submit that recommendation to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority by January.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1996 | From Bloomberg Business News
Transportation Secretary Federico Pena launched an initiative Thursday to form a system of government-sponsored banks to create more money for transportation projects and more work for private construction companies. The plan would allow states to use a portion of their federal highway funding to set up banks to lend the money to public agencies and public-private partnerships for construction of roads, bridges and other transportation projects.
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