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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2007 | Duke Helfand and Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writers
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa spoke publicly for the first time Monday about the breakup of his 20-year marriage, saying he was responsible for the split even as he refused to talk about what caused it. In a somber meeting with reporters at City Hall, Villaraigosa declined to answer questions about whether the break with his wife, Corina, was triggered by another romantic relationship.
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NEWS
April 12, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
Actress Scarlett Johansson topped the box office charts last weekend playing the character of Black Widow in the Marvel superhero flick "Captain America: The Winter Soldier. " That same weekend she was on screen as a man-eater of a different type in the cryptic indie sci-fi film "Under the Skin. " As a space alien in human form who lures male victims into a mysterious black void, Johansson gives a performance at once sinister, sultry and unexpectedly sympathetic. If "Captain America" was the latest product of a studio franchise machine, "Under the Skin" was the handcrafted result of writer-director Jonathan Glazer's 10-year quest to bring a singular experience to the screen.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Joel Rubin
Los Angeles police officers tampered with voice recording equipment in dozens of patrol cars in an effort to avoid being monitored while on duty, according to records and interviews. An inspection by Los Angeles Police Department investigators found about half of the estimated 80 cars in one South L.A. patrol division were missing antennas, which help capture what officers say in the field. The antennas in at least 10 more cars in nearby divisions had also been removed. LAPD Chief Charlie Beck and other top officials learned of the problem last summer but chose not to investigate which officers were responsible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
Bighorn sheep are skilled mountain climbers. But one group recently made it over the Sierra Nevada crest in record time. As part of an ongoing effort to return endangered Sierra Nevada bighorns to more of their historical range, state and federal wildlife workers captured 14 of the animals in the Inyo National Forest and transported them by helicopter to the Big Arroyo area of Sequoia National Park on the range's west side. The four rams and 10 ewes, all but one of which was pregnant, were moved in late March to a part of the Sierra that bighorns have not occupied for more than a century.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It is, Kristen Stewart agrees, just like falling in love. "It's just a very familiar, necessary feeling when you read a script you want to do," the actress says, coming alive at just the memory. "I've gone with my gut, taken a lot of the thinking away, and been very lucky. "As an artist," she continues, her energy rising, "If you view what you do as product, you'll never do anything true to yourself, never do anything you're proud of. I've never thought, 'My career should go in this direction.' There's no way to be tactical for me. " PHOTOS: Sundance Film Festival 2014 | The Scene Stewart got that familiar feeling when she read writer-director Peter Sattler's script for "Camp X-Ray," which has its debut Friday as part of the Sundance Film Festival's dramatic competition.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
DALLAS - I hadn't been standing in Dealey Plaza more than five minutes when I watched a man dash out into the street to pose for a picture. He was heading straight for a white X in the pavement that marks the location of John F. Kennedy's limousine when the 35th president was fatally shot on the afternoon of Nov. 22, 1963. The man stopped on the X, adjusted his feet and smiled. Then he looked nervously in the direction of oncoming traffic before running back to the safety of the sidewalk.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
It looks like it's all downhill from here: Eva Longoria has been named Maxim's Woman of the Year. In January. Nothing like getting the routine stuff done early, right? Longoria graces the men's magazine's January/February cover in a skimpy tank top, but inside the mag (via E! News ) insists she's really a homebody who doesn't fall back on her looks alone. "One thing people are usually surprised about when they get to know me is how domestic I am. So when you see the sexy Maxim cover and then you put it against me in an apron with flour in my hair, it takes a moment to reconcile that image," the former "Desperate Housewives" star said in an interview that was rescheduled to allow her to wrap up her thesis in Chicano studies, which she earned last year from Cal State Northridge.  Twice married, most recently to NBA player Tony Parker, she's now dating Televisa honcho Jose "Pepe" Antonio Baston.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1990
Now it's rock music as a weapon against Washington state sea lions (Part A, Jan. 29)! Where's the SPCA? AL HIX Hollywood
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1988
Now that the minority is the majority in California's schools ("Minorities Now a Majority in State's Schools," Part I, Sept. 7), will they be known as the majority and the majority as the minority? Or will the minority always be the minority even though they are the majority? LINDA PARK NISHIDA Walnut
OPINION
December 7, 1997
What part of janet reNO don't you understand? LYLE TALBOT Lancaster
TRAVEL
April 11, 2014 | By Alice Short
CHARLESTON, S.C. - Two of the top destinations on a recent trip to Charleston - Ft. Sumter and the Confederacy's H. L. Hunley submarine - transcend the label of "Civil War attraction. " These sites appeal to students of U.S. history, to devotees of military archives and to those who value peace over war. After a 30-minute ferry trip from the city to the man-made island that is the site of Ft. Sumter, my tour group encountered park ranger Dennis Birr, who proved to be a combination of historian, carnival barker and motivational speaker.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Diana Marcum, Scott Gold and Marisa Gerber
RICHGROVE, Calif. - In March 2013, a man with brooding, mahogany eyes and a walrus mustache traveled from his home in California to visit relatives in Alabama. The trip did not end well. When a business acquaintance insulted Jose Manuel Martinez's daughter, Martinez put two bullets in the man's head, officials said. It was a matter "of family honor," Errek Jett, an Alabama prosecutor, said Wednesday. But it was not, it turned out, the first time he had killed - far from it, authorities believe.
REAL ESTATE
April 8, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
More than a year after it approved a report critical of the CIA's interrogation and detention policies, the Senate Intelligence Committee has voted to make a portion of the document public. It's now up to President Obama to ensure that the agency doesn't mount a rear-guard attempt to censor or sanitize the committee's findings in the name of national security. Thanks to news reports and a report by the CIA's inspector general, Americans long have been aware of both the broad outlines and some abhorrent details of the Bush administration's mistreatment of suspected terrorists after 9/11.
SPORTS
April 7, 2014 | By Chris Dufresne
Connecticut guard Shabazz Napier was named on Monday the most outstanding player of the NCAA tournament Final Four. He was joined on the team by Julius Randle of Kentucky and Connecticut's Ryan Boatright and DeAndre Daniels . Meanwhile, though no teams from Los Angeles made it to this year's title game, the Southland did provide some of the talent. Connecticut second-year Coach Kevin Ollie claims North Texas as home but attended Crenshaw High. He starred at Connecticut and spent 13 years in the NBA before joining Jim Calhoun 's coaching staff.
TRAVEL
April 4, 2014 | By Marc Stirdivant
Buellton, 25 miles north of Santa Barbara, has been known for just one thing: split pea soup. For years, Buellton was that midday rest stop on the way to points north where you lunched at Pea Soup Andersen's. No longer in the shadow of trendier neighbors Solvang and Los Olivos, Buellton has taken on a life of its own. It's a fun place to stay, explore, eat and drink - and I'm not just referring to wine. The bed Buellton has at least one remarkable place to spend the night, the Flying Flags RV park (180 Avenue of Flags; [805]
SPORTS
April 4, 2014 | By Bill Shaikin
Four minutes before Hyun-Jin Ryu threw the first pitch of the Dodgers' home opener Friday, Time Warner Cable hit the send button. Vin Scully had just handed the ceremonial first pitch to Sandy Koufax, two of the most beloved sports figures in Los Angeles history teaming up to welcome baseball back to Dodger Stadium. It was a goosebump moment in person and on television, except that most of Southern California cannot see the Dodgers on television. In an email blast to DirecTV subscribers demanding their Dodgers, TWC put the blame on DirecTV.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1996
Stock listings--Part of the New York Stock Exchange listings did not appear in some editions Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1988
So the Postal Service will be reducing service (Part I, Jan. 17). How will we notice? JOHN M. STALBERG Pacific Palisades
OPINION
March 30, 2014
Re "The water revolution we need," Opinion, March 28 It's deceptive to say that agriculture uses 75% of "the water used in the state" without adding "for human use. " According to the California State Water Plan, urban use accounts for 11% and agriculture 41%; environmental use accounts for 48%. This is the developed water supply that can be managed and controlled. Agricultural water efficiency has never been greater. Farmers have invested billions of dollars in drip irrigation and other efficiency technologies and produce 85.4% more food and fiber per acre-foot of water than they did in 1967.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2014 | By Dan Weikel
The Santa Monica City Council this week launched an effort to close all or part of the city's airport after July 2015 - a move that could result in years of additional court battles with the federal government. Council members voted 6 to 0 late Tuesday to develop and evaluate a strategy to scale back flight operations, cut the 5,000-foot runway by 2,000 feet and reduce aviation-related services, such as fuel sales and flight schools. The decision also calls for the city to consider converting airport land to low-impact non-aviation uses.
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