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BUSINESS
March 21, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Ratepayers of Southern California Edison Co. and San Diego Gas & Electric Co. could be in line for a share of more than $1 billion in refunds as part of a possible financial settlement from the closure of the San Onofre nuclear power plant. Both Edison and another party to the negotiations, the Utility Reform Network (TURN), a consumer advocacy group, confirmed that a settlement conference is scheduled Thursday at the San Francisco headquarters of the California Public Utilities Commission.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2014 | By Victoria Kim
For decades, Southern California was the undisputed capital of bank robbery. When five Bank of America branches were robbed in under an hour, an FBI agent shrugged and called it "just another day in L.A. " It was fodder for national news and Hollywood scripts, and the FBI field office had "Bank Robbery Capital of the World" emblazoned on its fax cover sheets. In 1992, the worst year, as many as 28 Los Angeles banks were robbed in a single day. Then the number of robberies began falling, part of an overall trend that has seen crime rates plummet across the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2014 | By Larry Gordon
SAN FRANCISCO - The University of California took a big step Thursday toward what astronomers predict will be vastly improved exploration of the solar system and universe. The UC regents approved the university's participation in the construction and operation of the Thirty Meter Telescope in Hawaii, a scientifically ambitious project shared by Caltech and astronomy groups from Canada, Japan, India and China. The $1.4-billion telescope was described as the most advanced optical telescope in the world, with extra power and improved clarity to see distant planets and older stars than is possible now. Construction is scheduled to start this year and the telescope would be in operation in 2022, officials said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
On Wednesday we noted that Shailene Woodley, star of the upcoming movies "Divergent" and "The Fault in Our Stars," isn't just a rising Hollywood starlet: She's also a font of quirky wisdom. Having gone over the benefits of eating clay and tanning one's nether regions (of course), we now present another installment of Woodley wisdom. On starting (and ending) the day right: It's important to get off on the right foot each day. In the August 2013 issue of Interview, Woodley talked to  fellow actress Emma Stone about her morning ritual.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2014 | By E. Scott Reckard
California victims of alleged foreclosure abuses will get $268 million in relief from a $2.1-billion national settlement with Ocwen Financial Corp., the nation's largest non-bank provider of mortgage customer service. Ocwen broke state law by improperly denying loan modifications, failing to honor modifications granted by prior servicers and charging unauthorized fees, according to the California Department of Business Oversight. "Californians should not lose their homes because of deceptive and poorly executed mortgage servicing practices," Commissioner of Business Oversight Jan Lynn Owen said Monday in a news release.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
I fear for the future of James Franco's acting career. And when I say acting, I'm referring to Franco's portrayal of other characters, not the growing number of meta performances the actor is amassing. It's not that Franco is bad at playing Franco. If anything, the problem is how good his self-referential work has become in the years since his 2011 Oscar nomination for playing someone else in "127 Hours. " That performance as a stranded solo hiker, the fear rising, the bravado breaking down, put him on the hot list of the young and the talented.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2014 | By David Zahniser
Nearly a decade ago, Enrique Ramirez welcomed the opening of a light-rail station in Little Tokyo, just a quick walk from his Mexican seafood restaurant. The Metro Gold Line station delivered a steady stream of customers to Senor Fish, especially on weekends. But now, with the region's rail system expanding again, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority is pushing him out. On Saturday, Senor Fish abandoned its location at the corner of 1st and Alameda streets. And later this year, Metro is set to demolish the property's two brick buildings, which are located across the street from the Japanese American National Museum and have played an important role in the cultural life of the neighborhood for decades.
AUTOS
March 14, 2014 | By David Undercoffler
It is a mix of emotions only an Italian car can evoke. Maserati's all-new Ghibli and redesigned Quattroporte sedans thrill with all the lusty performance and high style expected from a brand with a loose connection to Ferrari. But - mama mia! - pity anyone hoping to roll down the window or turn on the lights in either of these Maseratis. This poor soul encounters third-rate plastic pieces that Maserati grabbed out of Chrysler's corporate parts bin. After a week of testing both the 2014 Ghibli and the 2014 Quattroporte, we were left more than a little frustrated by how a shoddy interior can foul an otherwise delizioso dish.
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Lisa Boone
The Los Angeles edition of the Architecture & Design Film Festival kicks off its five-day salute to art, architecture, design, fashion and urban planning Wednesday with showings of "If You Build It," "Design Is One: Massimo & Leila Vignelli" and "16 Acres. " The L.A. film festival, running through Sunday, will feature 30 recent feature-length and short films from around the world. "There is something for everyone who likes design at the festival," said the festival's founder and director, architect Kyle Bergman.
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