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Particulate Matter

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2006 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
The number of deaths from breathing sooty smog in California may be more than twice as high as previously estimated, based on a recent USC study that examined the risk of such deaths in the Los Angeles Basin. A team of researchers headed by Michael Jerrett, associate professor of preventive medicine, found two to three times greater risk of mortality from heart attacks, lung cancer and other serious illness tied to chronic exposure to fine particulate matter than did previous studies.
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NEWS
June 5, 2000 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Even moderate air pollution routinely found in many U.S. cities may trigger sudden deaths by changing heart rhythms in people with existing cardiac problems, according to extensive new scientific research. The finding, backed by more than a dozen studies on humans and animals, suggests that heart attacks, not lung disease, may be the most serious medical threat posed by air pollution. The culprits appear to be tiny pieces of soot called particulates.
NEWS
June 6, 1997 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
When tiny particles of pollution descend on a city, everything--skyscrapers, mountains, the horizon--drowns in a sea of soot that can persist for days and stretch for miles. But something more ominous happens too. Death counts rise. People who might have survived a heart attack or bout of pneumonia or other illness are more likely to die. Scientists consider the link between airborne particles and premature deaths about as compelling and well-documented as any finding can be.
NEWS
May 9, 1996 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Nearly 6,000 residents of Greater Los Angeles, and 64,000 people in major American cities, may be dying annually from lung or heart problems aggravated by breathing the gritty air pollution known as particulates, according to a study released Wednesday by a national environmental group. The microscopic particles are considered by health experts to be the deadliest air pollutant, yet this is the first time that anyone has tried to quantify the threat nationally and from city to city. In 239 U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1995 | From Times staff and wire reports
A huge dust storm brewing off Jupiter is bombarding the Galileo spacecraft on the way to the planet with as many as 20,000 electrically charged particles a day, sources at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena reported this week. It is the largest interplanetary dust storm ever measured. Using a detector the size of a kitchen colander to collect and count the smoke-sized particles, Galileo has clocked the particles at speeds up to 450,000 m.p.h.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1995 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Seeking a crackdown on a dangerous air pollutant, the American Lung Assn. said Wednesday that a stricter limit on airborne particulates would produce nearly $11 billion a year in health-related savings and benefits in the United States. Particulates are tiny pieces of carbon soot, acid, dirt and other substances that can lodge in lungs and obscure skies with a dark shroud of pollution.
NEWS
February 12, 1995 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
Marching to the chant of "Comunidad, si! Montana, no!" with a 60-foot mountain of debris as backdrop, a residents group gathered last week at the gates of a concrete recycling plant to demand that the city take quicker action deciding whether the company should continue operating. Two hours after the afternoon demonstration at Aggregate Recycling System's South Alameda Street plant, 30 members of the group took their protest indoors at the Monday night City Council meeting.
NEWS
December 27, 1994 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
It sounds like a recipe for some sort of noxious stew: Take soot from trucks and buses, add a bit of ammonia from dairy farms, mix in nitrates from car exhaust, a hefty dose of dust and dirt that blow off streets and construction sites, a sprinkling of ash from fires, some sulfur from factories and a final dash of sea salts.
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