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Party Line

NATIONAL
September 8, 2004 | Michael Finnegan, Times Staff Writer
Barely 100 miles separate the day-to-day lives of Santa Monica office manager Harriet Orinstein and Bakersfield teacher Andre Casillas. Yet these two Californians hold wildly different views that illustrate the state's two political worlds. Orinstein, a 52-year-old vegetarian who votes for Democrats and Greens, lives with her boyfriend in a rent-controlled, one-bedroom apartment near the beach. She opposes the Iraq war and supports same-sex marriage and abortion rights.
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NEWS
January 31, 1999 | WILSON RING, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Off the pavement, past the farms, over the one-lane bridge and across the abandoned railroad crossing is another example of Vermont's vanishing rural heritage: A party-line telephone. Two families in the middle of Franklin County's rolling farmland are among the dwindling few to share a telephone line. In this age of fiber optics, answering machines, caller ID, call forwarding and computer modems, these families have to listen when the phone rings to see if it's for them.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1990 | KENNETH HERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was no surprise that UC San Diego music professor Janos Negyesy chose to perform John Cage's "Freeman Etudes" at a Bartok festival in Szombathely, Hungary, this summer. The trip was his first visit in 25 years to his native country, and his choice of music symbolized the musician he had become in the West after defecting in 1965 when the authorities refused him permission to study music in West Germany.
NEWS
July 11, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under the chandeliers of the Kremlin's yellow-hued Oval Room, 77 Communists gathered this week to hammer out the party line. To track the process was to glimpse Mikhail S. Gorbachev's party in microcosm, navigating somewhere between freewheeling democracy and the top-heavy centralism of the Brezhnevian past. Hundreds of provincial party delegates in Moscow for the Communist Party congress had their say, but so did the Kremlin leadership and its designated brains.
NEWS
August 29, 1996 | PAMELA WARRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We are gathered here together to have a really good time. --Hillary Rodham Clinton * And they are having a good time. Despite long, hot waits to simply enter the excruciatingly well-secured United Center, speeches that last far into the night, and next to no time for naps, delegates are following the advice of those two fun-loving guys from nearby Aurora: "Party on, Garth! Party on, Wayne!"
OPINION
January 21, 2009
Re "Her own party line," Jan. 17 The Times writes of Dianne Feinstein that "California's senior senator will not be taken for granted or hew to the party line." In my opinion, Feinstein should be "taken for granted," and perhaps is a Democrat in the same sense that Zell Miller or Joe Lieberman were Democrats. She pretty much signed off on President Bush's domestic wiretapping. I signed an on-line petition asking her to support the impeachment of Bush. I received a reply indicating that she found impeachment divisive and therefore would not support such a measure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1998 | MICHAEL G. WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While on duty, a sergeant in the Orange County Sheriff's Department made hundreds of unauthorized telephone calls--some lasting more than 30 minutes to "party" and chat lines, according to copies of records obtained under the California Public Records Act. Most of the calls were made from the sheriff's internal affairs division--the branch that investigates misconduct by officers--where the sergeant, identified by sources as Steve Grosskopf, worked until he was promoted and transferred.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1994
In the article on Jack Kemp voicing his opposition to Proposition 187 (Oct. 20), Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Huntington Beach) was quoted as saying Kemp "should have kept his mouth shut." Who does Rohrabacher think he is? Mr. Kemp accurately points out the proposition won't work and that its only value is as a statement to the federal government to do something. While I agree with Kemp, Rohrabacher's comment is just plain stupid. Kemp should be lauded for his "guts" in speaking his mind, not toeing the party line (if indeed it is the party line)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1987 | ANTHONY PERRY, Times Staff Writer
Barbara Duggan remembers how word of her marriage to a young soldier in 1941 spread quickly throughout Ramona and Julian. She had called her cousin on the telephone and within a wink everybody knew. After all, the phone was a party line. "I told her, 'I got something to tell you but you have to come over to the house,' " Duggan said. "She said, 'You went over to Yuma and got married, didn't you?' Well, that did it, within a half hour everybody knew my secret."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1991
The assassination of John F. Kennedy has remained a painful memory to me and many Americans. The current movie ("JFK") has brought out the "experts" like George Will and Kenneth Klein, Commentary, Dec. 24) to defend the official party line regarding the lone assassin and the magic bullet. My question is: If it was all as simple as the defenders claim, why did President Johnson declare that certain details would be sealed in the archives for 75 years? ARTIE KANE, Los Angeles
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