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Pasadena Blue Line

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OPINION
June 28, 1998
Re "Rail Supporters Giving a Push to Stalled Pasadena Project," June 22: When will the MTA and the residents and politicians of Pasadena quit playing "Alice in Transit-land"? Why do the taxpayers have to have a light-rail system ramrodded down their throats when another alternative makes so much more sense? The proposed "North" Blue Line (the one to Pasadena) won't even physically connect with the already-existing "South" Blue Line (the one to Long Beach). When it comes time for routine maintenance of the light-rail vehicles, are we going to truck them down to the repair shop in Carson?
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2001 | KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All is not rosy in Pasadena, where light rail, once Blue, will now be Gold. Confused? Transportation planners hope riders on a future light rail train won't be. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority board voted unanimously Thursday to change the name of the light rail line, now under construction, that will connect downtown Los Angeles and Pasadena. What for at least a decade of planning has been called the Pasadena Blue Line will now officially be the Gold Line. The reason?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2001
Re "Hundreds Have Their Say About Blue Line Plan," Nov. 6: With regard to the controversy over rail crossings on the Pasadena Blue Line, I ask, when do activists transform into reactionaries? Perhaps when their professed concern over the safety of children disguises a desire to preserve their urban idyll or, more cynically, their property values. Marmion Way in Mt. Washington is not "densely packed" by any fair-minded city dweller's account. Pedestrians are rare except for those who use the bus stops, the very people who will likely welcome the option of real rapid transit in a city bereft of decent transportation options.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2001
The state Public Utilities Commission will review an order that has allowed construction of the Pasadena Blue Line to continue despite a dispute over controversial street crossings. Earlier this month, agency board member Richard Bilas gave the builders of the line the right to begin laying track on streets and intersections along the 13.7-mile rail line. However, the PUC is not scheduled to complete a review of the crossings' safety until May.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2001 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pasadena Blue Line project that was supposed to help set the standard for on-time, on-budget efficiency in local mass transit now faces the most elemental kind of problem: It rushed into construction without all the necessary regulatory approvals. The much-anticipated Blue Line is being built by an independent authority that was supposed to spare it the many cost overruns, safety hazards and management miscues that plagued the city's subway construction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1994 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a hotly debated meeting marked by a raucous public demonstration, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority adopted a $2.9-billion budget Wednesday that includes spending $123 million for projects on the Pasadena Blue Line light rail system. The authority's approval of a 1994-95 fiscal budget was unanimous.
NEWS
August 29, 1993 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the spirit of the old refrain "Clang! Clang! Clang! goes the trolley," boosters of the Pasadena Blue Line were singing happily last week after county transit officials committed to a $97-million compromise plan that keeps the project alive. "Pasadena is feeling good today," the city's public works director, Cynthia Kurtz, said Thursday, the day after the Metropolitan Transportation Authority decided to continue funding for the 13.6-mile light-rail line from downtown Los Angeles to Pasadena.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1994 | BILL CROWFOOT and BILL TAN and ERIC TORO, Bill Crowfoot is an attorney and a member of the Pasadena City Council; Bill Tan is an attorney and Chinatown community activist, and Eric Toro is a businessman and community activist in Highland Park and a member of its Chamber of Commerce. and
Having failed to kill the Los Angeles-to-Pasadena Blue Line project during budget deliberations of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, opponents of the project have gone to federal court to paralyze the ongoing construction of a system that twice was approved by the voters. When they adopted Propositions A and C in 1980 and 1990, respectively, the people of Los Angeles County issued an unmistakable mandate by choosing rail as part of the region's transportation future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2000
Great to hear news of the first leg of construction on Pasadena Blue Line (April 13) as the final three stations of the Red Line open in late June. Let's keep this subway and light-rail line going so the system makes sense to use, whether you have a car or not. Why not link up the Red Line station in North Hollywood with the Memorial Park Station on the Pasadena Blue Line? It would be wonderful to be able to travel to events, to commute or visit family members without having to drive a car. ANDREW P. CRANE Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1999
Here's my thoughts on "Grand Change for the Avenue?" (by Nicolai Ouroussoff, Dec. 19). In place of the useless pedestrian walk down the center of the street, why not extend the Blue Line light rail from its current terminating stop at 7th and Flower? Put the train on a lowered track down Grand Avenue past the new cathedral and connect to a future station for the Pasadena Blue Line near or north of Chinatown. This would add riders to the Blue Line and eliminate the need to transfer from the Blue Line to the Red Line to get to the Pasadena Blue Line via Union Station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2001
The state Public Utilities Commission will review an order that has allowed construction of the Pasadena Blue Line to continue despite a dispute over street crossings. Earlier this month, agency board member Richard Bilas gave the builders of the line the right to begin laying track on streets and intersections along the 13.7-mile rail line. However, the PUC is not scheduled to complete a review of the crossings' safety until May.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2001
Re "Hundreds Have Their Say About Blue Line Plan," Nov. 6: With regard to the controversy over rail crossings on the Pasadena Blue Line, I ask, when do activists transform into reactionaries? Perhaps when their professed concern over the safety of children disguises a desire to preserve their urban idyll or, more cynically, their property values. Marmion Way in Mt. Washington is not "densely packed" by any fair-minded city dweller's account. Pedestrians are rare except for those who use the bus stops, the very people who will likely welcome the option of real rapid transit in a city bereft of decent transportation options.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2001 | KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The public agency that wants to build a light-rail line between Pasadena and Los Angeles hoped to avoid the pitfalls that have bogged down other major mass transit projects in the region. It had the path: a dedicated right of way where passenger trains had run for nearly 100 years. It had the money: $732 million set aside in an agreement pushed by the state. It had the mandate: get the job done on time and on budget, as promised to the state and local politicians, who agreed to pay for the job.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2001 | KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Public Utilities Commission granted temporary approval Friday for workers to begin laying track at 60 street crossings for the Blue Line rail connecting Pasadena with downtown Los Angeles. But a key state official warned the tracks might never be used if the PUC doesn't give final approval for a 13.7-mile light rail to cross city streets. About half of the transit system is finished.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2001 | KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing a drawn-out regulatory review that they say could threaten completion of the Pasadena Blue Line, the builders of the light-rail project have asked a state agency to allow construction to continue at street crossings that have drawn the ire of local activists. The Pasadena Blue Line Construction Authority filed a motion Friday with the state Public Utilities Commission, asking permission to begin laying track at about 60 locations where the rail line crosses roadways.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2001
While the Pasadena Blue Line is still in its early stages (Aug. 13), couldn't we consider a new name/color? People who use fixed rail transport around the world generally expect to be able to travel from one end of a line to the other. The Blue Line will never connect Long Beach to Pasadena without a transfer to the Red Line downtown. To avoid confusion, why not use orange, yellow or purple? It's not as if we have to save colors for all the other future fixed-rail projects we are planning to build.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1995
Pasadena's elected leaders have their own line on the county's effort to get its hands on transit funds to help balance the budget. The Blue Line, to be specific. In an emergency vote, the City Council decided to ask Gov. Pete Wilson to veto a bill that would divert $75 million from county transit funds for five years. That would delay construction of the Pasadena Blue Line for five to seven years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1998
The City Council has decided to support a state senator's plan to uncouple the partially constructed Pasadena Blue Line from the Metropolitan Transit Authority and form a separate agency for its completion. Council members Monday unanimously gave their approval to a breakaway bill authored by state Sen. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) that would create a separate joint-powers authority for the 13-mile light-rail line between Los Angeles and Pasadena.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2001 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pasadena Blue Line project that was supposed to help set the standard for on-time, on-budget efficiency in local mass transit now faces the most elemental kind of problem: It rushed into construction without all the necessary regulatory approvals. The much-anticipated Blue Line is being built by an independent authority that was supposed to spare it the many cost overruns, safety hazards and management miscues that plagued the city's subway construction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2000 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years on the drawing boards, a long-delayed light-rail line from Union Station to Pasadena is finally moving into the concrete and rails stage. More than 2,600 tons of steel rails from a Pennsylvania foundry are now stacked at a staging area near downtown Los Angeles. Concrete has been poured for the first structures that will support a half-mile stretch of elevated track from Union Station to Chinatown.
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