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Pasadena Ca Budget

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1992 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Call it extreme devotion to the duty of supplying readers with books. Pasadena Public Library employees have turned down scheduled pay raises averaging more than $100 a month to reduce the effect of budget cuts on the library system. With library officials preparing for a systemwide shortening of the business day or cuts in the book budget, 102 of the department's 110 librarians and clerical workers chose last week to forgo raises of 3.5% to 4%, due to take effect next month.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1997
The City Council has approved a $350-million budget for the fiscal year that began Tuesday, but it delayed some painful cuts to jobs and services. Mayor Chris Holden persuaded his council colleagues to abandon the city's usual two-year budget in favor of a single-year budget. The second year is when deeper cuts will have to be made to ensure a balanced budget, city officials said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1997
The City Council has approved a $350-million budget for the fiscal year that began Tuesday, but it delayed some painful cuts to jobs and services. Mayor Chris Holden persuaded his council colleagues to abandon the city's usual two-year budget in favor of a single-year budget. The second year is when deeper cuts will have to be made to ensure a balanced budget, city officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1997
Pasadena's city manager Monday will present a general fund budget for the coming fiscal year to the City Council that calls for $2.2 million less in spending. The proposed budget eliminates some unfilled jobs and transfers some employees to understaffed departments, absorbs the Parks and Recreation Department into other divisions and combines the city's Affirmative Action Commission with the Human Relations Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1997
Pasadena's city manager Monday will present a general fund budget for the coming fiscal year to the City Council that calls for $2.2 million less in spending. The proposed budget eliminates some unfilled jobs and transfers some employees to understaffed departments, absorbs the Parks and Recreation Department into other divisions and combines the city's Affirmative Action Commission with the Human Relations Commission.
NEWS
March 18, 1993 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The people spoke this week about the proposed $6.8-million tax for Pasadena's libraries, and the message was clear: There aren't enough votes to pass it. The proposed special tax to provide "stable, long-range funding for the library," as one library official put it, drew roughly equal numbers of proponents and opponents to an overflow City Council hearing Tuesday. Of 52 speakers, 28 spoke against the tax, 24 spoke for it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1992
Faced with nearly $350,000 in budget cuts, the Pasadena Public Library will eliminate weekday morning service at its central branch and close other branches on certain days of the week, officials said Tuesday. "A reduction in library hours, though regrettable, is unavoidable given the hard economic times," said Principal Librarian Vickey Johnson. Johson said library staffers have decided to give back the raises they received this year, which will save the city $110,000.
NEWS
April 8, 1993 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The City Council sliced $3.6 million out of next year's general fund budget, but council members rejected City Manager Philip Hawkey's proposals to lay off nine police cadets and police assistants and to cut off funds to the city's AIDS program. The council also saved a program of subsidies for arts programs and rejected a proposal to eliminate the job of Human Services Coordinator Vicki Tamoush, who administers the Human Relations Commission.
NEWS
May 20, 1993 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pasadena's budget crunch is the worst in 15 years, forcing the City Council to consider such unpopular measures as closing libraries, slicing the City Hall staff by 3% and shrinking historic-preservation programs. "We're headed for a dogfight here," Councilman Isaac Richard warned Tuesday night at a public hearing on the spending plan for the fiscal year starting July 1. "This budget is so fraught with political land mines that it's not even funny."
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So Pasadena voters won't accept $7 million in new taxes. How about $1.3 million? The City Council, which last week dropped a multimillion-dollar tax proposal like a hot potato, has come up with a more modest proposal to save the city's library system. Instead of having the entire library budget financed by a special tax, which the local business community protested en masse, only part of it will be--if the plan gets voter approval.
NEWS
May 20, 1993 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pasadena's budget crunch is the worst in 15 years, forcing the City Council to consider such unpopular measures as closing libraries, slicing the City Hall staff by 3% and shrinking historic-preservation programs. "We're headed for a dogfight here," Councilman Isaac Richard warned Tuesday night at a public hearing on the spending plan for the fiscal year starting July 1. "This budget is so fraught with political land mines that it's not even funny."
NEWS
April 8, 1993 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The City Council sliced $3.6 million out of next year's general fund budget, but council members rejected City Manager Philip Hawkey's proposals to lay off nine police cadets and police assistants and to cut off funds to the city's AIDS program. The council also saved a program of subsidies for arts programs and rejected a proposal to eliminate the job of Human Services Coordinator Vicki Tamoush, who administers the Human Relations Commission.
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So Pasadena voters won't accept $7 million in new taxes. How about $1.3 million? The City Council, which last week dropped a multimillion-dollar tax proposal like a hot potato, has come up with a more modest proposal to save the city's library system. Instead of having the entire library budget financed by a special tax, which the local business community protested en masse, only part of it will be--if the plan gets voter approval.
NEWS
March 18, 1993 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The people spoke this week about the proposed $6.8-million tax for Pasadena's libraries, and the message was clear: There aren't enough votes to pass it. The proposed special tax to provide "stable, long-range funding for the library," as one library official put it, drew roughly equal numbers of proponents and opponents to an overflow City Council hearing Tuesday. Of 52 speakers, 28 spoke against the tax, 24 spoke for it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1992
Faced with nearly $350,000 in budget cuts, the Pasadena Public Library will eliminate weekday morning service at its central branch and close other branches on certain days of the week, officials said Tuesday. "A reduction in library hours, though regrettable, is unavoidable given the hard economic times," said Principal Librarian Vickey Johnson. Johson said library staffers have decided to give back the raises they received this year, which will save the city $110,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1992 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Call it extreme devotion to the duty of supplying readers with books. Pasadena Public Library employees have turned down scheduled pay raises averaging more than $100 a month to reduce the effect of budget cuts on the library system. With library officials preparing for a systemwide shortening of the business day or cuts in the book budget, 102 of the department's 110 librarians and clerical workers chose last week to forgo raises of 3.5% to 4%, due to take effect next month.
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