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NEWS
January 3, 1993
The lump in my throat rose as Bruce Ackerman, chief executive officer of the Pasadena Chamber of Commerce and my employer, informed the staff of his resignation. This was the last thing I had expected to hear from him. I am the chamber's operations manager/controller. I would like to start off by saying that I am Latin and not a "young white female" that the press has portrayed. The reason I have chosen to write to you is to inform you of a lot of misinformation that has been published.
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BUSINESS
December 31, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
Pasadena is awash in white and cardinal red, and that should result in lots of green for local retailers. The Rose Parade, a Pasadena tradition for more than 120 years, is expected to draw between 700,000 and 1 million visitors on New Year's Day, about the same as last year, said Paul Little, chief executive of the Pasadena Chamber of Commerce. The parade viewing numbers are often impacted by the teams that play in the Rose Bowl game, and the fans that attend the game. This year's matchup -- Stanford University versus the University of Wisconsin -- should have a strong following, Little said.
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NEWS
May 5, 1985 | DEBORAH HASTINGS, Times Staff Writer
Rolfe Arnhym, the controversial executive vice president of the Pasadena Chamber of Commerce and the driving force behind bringing the financially ill-fated 1983 Army-Navy game to this city, has announced that he will resign his post on May 15. Arnhym, 54, said he is leaving Pasadena to become executive vice president of the Long Beach Chamber of Commerce because it is "an offer that I just can't resist."
NEWS
January 3, 1993
The lump in my throat rose as Bruce Ackerman, chief executive officer of the Pasadena Chamber of Commerce and my employer, informed the staff of his resignation. This was the last thing I had expected to hear from him. I am the chamber's operations manager/controller. I would like to start off by saying that I am Latin and not a "young white female" that the press has portrayed. The reason I have chosen to write to you is to inform you of a lot of misinformation that has been published.
NEWS
March 22, 1990
The Pasadena Chamber of Commerce has been closely following the city of Pasadena finance committee's deliberations on the city's budget for (fiscal year) 90-91. At its last meeting on Feb. 21, the chamber's budget review committee agreed on four recommendations, all of which are based on the chamber's belief that the city's business environment must continue to be competitive with surrounding communities in order to maintain economic stability for the benefit of all residents. Therefore, it behooves the city of Pasadena to keep its costs down by prudent and tough-minded fiscal management.
BUSINESS
December 31, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
Pasadena is awash in white and cardinal red, and that should result in lots of green for local retailers. The Rose Parade, a Pasadena tradition for more than 120 years, is expected to draw between 700,000 and 1 million visitors on New Year's Day, about the same as last year, said Paul Little, chief executive of the Pasadena Chamber of Commerce. The parade viewing numbers are often impacted by the teams that play in the Rose Bowl game, and the fans that attend the game. This year's matchup -- Stanford University versus the University of Wisconsin -- should have a strong following, Little said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1989
Pasadena has been blessed frequently in the past when, after much labor and debate, the city Board of Directors did not adopt a proposed plan. This has enabled us to avoid serious mistakes and gross errors in direction planning. The Livingston/Blaney study of Colorado Boulevard was such a case where we would have destroyed the center of town if we had carried out the plan. The study did provide valuable review and input for later planning consideration, however, and it was the trigger for revitalization of the central business area.
NEWS
July 13, 1989
We might have guessed that outside developers, having been slowed down a bit by Proposition 2 (the PRIDE initiative), would contend that the voters were misled and really didn't understand the consequences of what they were doing. But it's disturbing to hear false propaganda from the Pasadena Chamber of Commerce, such as Ann Hight's statement to The Times (July 2) that Proposition 2 resulted in a $3.5-million Pasadena city budget shortfall because of decreased property tax valuations for vacant land.
NEWS
May 16, 1985
It is unfortunate timing for me and the city of Pasadena that Rolfe Arnhym, executive vice president of the Pasadena Chamber of Commerce, intends to leave Pasadena to take a similar position with the Long Beach Chamber of Commerce (Times, May 5). Arnhym was the chief architect for the 1983 Army-Navy game held in Pasadena's Rose Bowl. Local promoters and I were just about to unveil a proposal to rid the Army-Navy Game Foundation of its massive $2.5-million debt, including $174,000 owed the city of Pasadena for renting the Rose Bowl.
NEWS
November 8, 1992 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 40 demonstrators representing black and women's groups descended on the Colorado Boulevard headquarters of the Pasadena Chamber of Commerce last Thursday, chanting for the resignation of chamber Executive Director Bruce Ackerman. The demonstrators, who charged that Ackerman had practiced racial discrimination and sexual harassment, waved placards that accused the chamber of a "cover-up," and they chanted, "Bruce must go!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1992
The head of the Pasadena Chamber of Commerce, who has been accused by past and current employees of racial discrimination and sexual harassment, said Friday that he will resign at the end of the year in order deflect criticism from the organization. Chamber Chief Executive Officer Bruce Ackerman characterized the charges against him as "ludicrous and ridiculous," but said that his presence would make it "impossible for the chamber to continue its work" because of the continuing controversy.
NEWS
November 8, 1992 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 40 demonstrators representing black and women's groups descended on the Colorado Boulevard headquarters of the Pasadena Chamber of Commerce last Thursday, chanting for the resignation of chamber Executive Director Bruce Ackerman. The demonstrators, who charged that Ackerman had practiced racial discrimination and sexual harassment, waved placards that accused the chamber of a "cover-up," and they chanted, "Bruce must go!"
NEWS
March 22, 1990
The Pasadena Chamber of Commerce has been closely following the city of Pasadena finance committee's deliberations on the city's budget for (fiscal year) 90-91. At its last meeting on Feb. 21, the chamber's budget review committee agreed on four recommendations, all of which are based on the chamber's belief that the city's business environment must continue to be competitive with surrounding communities in order to maintain economic stability for the benefit of all residents. Therefore, it behooves the city of Pasadena to keep its costs down by prudent and tough-minded fiscal management.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1989
Pasadena has been blessed frequently in the past when, after much labor and debate, the city Board of Directors did not adopt a proposed plan. This has enabled us to avoid serious mistakes and gross errors in direction planning. The Livingston/Blaney study of Colorado Boulevard was such a case where we would have destroyed the center of town if we had carried out the plan. The study did provide valuable review and input for later planning consideration, however, and it was the trigger for revitalization of the central business area.
NEWS
July 13, 1989
We might have guessed that outside developers, having been slowed down a bit by Proposition 2 (the PRIDE initiative), would contend that the voters were misled and really didn't understand the consequences of what they were doing. But it's disturbing to hear false propaganda from the Pasadena Chamber of Commerce, such as Ann Hight's statement to The Times (July 2) that Proposition 2 resulted in a $3.5-million Pasadena city budget shortfall because of decreased property tax valuations for vacant land.
NEWS
June 1, 1989
Perhaps there are good reasons why Pasadena should not tax interstate and foreign phone calls, but the Chamber of Commerce failed to mention any in their arguments to the Board of Directors. Chamber President Don Pollard claimed that businesses pay 60% of all city taxes and receive only 40% of the services, and that a new tax would weigh more heavily on the business community. He recommended that the city cut expenses for citizen committees and commissions rather than impose this new tax. I'm not in favor of this new tax, but I am disappointed in the chamber's attitude and in its apparent disdain for the residents of Pasadena.
NEWS
October 5, 1986 | MARY BARBER, Times Staff Writer
The Pasadena Chamber Orchestra's board of directors will remain intact and will consider proposals for future musical programs, its members agreed when they met Wednesday for the first time since they canceled the 1986-87 season. Acting President Peggy Phelps said no decision was made about future seasons, but some board members were hopeful that the sufficient funds could be raised for the orchestra to continue.
NEWS
June 1, 1989
Perhaps there are good reasons why Pasadena should not tax interstate and foreign phone calls, but the Chamber of Commerce failed to mention any in their arguments to the Board of Directors. Chamber President Don Pollard claimed that businesses pay 60% of all city taxes and receive only 40% of the services, and that a new tax would weigh more heavily on the business community. He recommended that the city cut expenses for citizen committees and commissions rather than impose this new tax. I'm not in favor of this new tax, but I am disappointed in the chamber's attitude and in its apparent disdain for the residents of Pasadena.
NEWS
March 12, 1987 | SUE AVERY, Times Staff Writer
An attempt is being made to breathe new life into the respected Pasadena Chamber Orchestra, which appeared dead last September after its board abruptly canceled the 1986-87 season. Board members say that if enough funds can be raised, the orchestra will perform two concerts this spring and schedule a complete season in the fall. "The possibilities are exciting," said Raymond Stults, who has been hired as a full-time consultant to help the orchestra get back on its feet.
NEWS
October 5, 1986 | MARY BARBER, Times Staff Writer
The Pasadena Chamber Orchestra's board of directors will remain intact and will consider proposals for future musical programs, its members agreed when they met Wednesday for the first time since they canceled the 1986-87 season. Acting President Peggy Phelps said no decision was made about future seasons, but some board members were hopeful that the sufficient funds could be raised for the orchestra to continue.
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