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NEWS
October 16, 2007
'Beyond Ultraman': An article in Thursday's Calendar Weekend about the art toy show "Beyond Ultraman" stated that it is a visiting exhibition at the Pasadena Museum of California Art and is being presented by the Los Angeles Toy, Doll and Amusements Museum. In fact, the show is a joint exhibition by both museums at the Pasadena site.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Alfredo Ramos Martínez was a few weeks shy of 58 when he packed up his studio and, with his wife and daughter, moved from Mexico City to Los Angeles in 1929. He arrived just in time for the epic collapse of the economy. Not surprisingly, the Great Depression is either subtext or frame of reference for much of the art he produced in L.A. before his death almost 17 years later. At the Pasadena Museum of California Art, "Picturing Mexico: Alfredo Ramos Martínez in California" attempts to come to terms with the work he produced here.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2008
"My art says that we are still here and the world doesn't look so bad after all," says Timothy J. Clark, host of PBS' "Focus on Watercolor" and the subject of a mid-career retrospective at the Pasadena Museum of California Art (pictured, detail of 1998's "Artist on the Hill"). On Saturday, Clark and guest curator Jean Stern will lead a walk through the show's 35 drawings, watercolors and oil paintings. 2 p.m. Sat., $6. Show ends April 13. www.pmcaonline.org
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Probably the most significant Sam Francis painting in an American collection is "Basel Mural I," which hangs in Pasadena's Norton Simon Museum. Part of an epic 1956 commission from a Swiss museum director, the canvas assembles patchy clouds of veiled, liquid color - watery blue, bright yellow and deep orange - that seem to grow and multiply like organic cells within a luminous white field. When it was finally installed two years later in the grand stairwell of the Basel Kunsthalle with its pair of companion paintings, the trio cemented Francis' reputation as a major artist.
NEWS
December 8, 2005 | Susan Carpenter
The way Herb Alpert sees it, his sculptures are "visual music." They are songs to be listened to, just like anything the famed trumpeter ever recorded with his Tijuana Brass. Beginning this week, anyone wanting to take a listen to Alpert's sculptures will have three opportunities. Twenty-six of his "spirit totems" are on display at the Pasadena Museum of California Art.
MAGAZINE
May 11, 2003 | GINNY CHIEN
Watercolorist Milford Zornes keeps coming back to Southern California even though his father once accused him "of having no ambition other than to go someplace," he says. The Claremont resident is indeed a fanatical traveler, schlepping his easel to such places as Uganda, India and Cuba. But Zornes' heart has always led him back to the region he has called home since 1925. In January, Zornes, who still paints, celebrated his 95th birthday.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2012
EVENTS The Pasadena Museum of California Art is turning 10 years old and to celebrate it's throwing a party for the people featuring a free beer garden, hands-on workshops, live performances, food trucks including Nom Nom, Cool Haus and Pie and Burger, and an old-fashioned birthday cake. Pasadena Museum of California Art, 490 East Union St., Pasadena. 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sat. Free. (626) 568-3665; http://www.pmcaonline.org.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2013 | By Holly Myers
Jessica Rath's project “Take Me to the Apple Breeder” at the Pasadena Museum of California Art, begins with a fundamentally captivating subject: the metaphor-rich science of apple cultivation. After coming across a mention in a book of the USDA's Plant Genetics Resource Unit at Cornell University, where endangered varieties of apples are preserved and clones crossbred to produce new varieties, Rath made several visits to the center over the course of three years and presumably learned a great deal about apples.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2013 | By Holly Myers
Jessica Rath's project “Take Me to the Apple Breeder” at the Pasadena Museum of California Art, begins with a fundamentally captivating subject: the metaphor-rich science of apple cultivation. After coming across a mention in a book of the USDA's Plant Genetics Resource Unit at Cornell University, where endangered varieties of apples are preserved and clones crossbred to produce new varieties, Rath made several visits to the center over the course of three years and presumably learned a great deal about apples.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2012 | By Scarlet Cheng
In 1933 America was staggering through the Great Depression, and Angelenos Jake Zeitlin and Delmer Daves organized a small group to support an artist they believed in, Paul Landacre. Each contributed $100 a year - that went a long way in those days - which awarded them a new print every month. Zeitlin ran an antiquarian book store, which included a small art gallery, and Daves was a budding Hollywood writer who would later direct the film noir classic "Dark Passage" (1947) and the original "3:10 to Yuma" (1957)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2012
EVENTS The Pasadena Museum of California Art is turning 10 years old and to celebrate it's throwing a party for the people featuring a free beer garden, hands-on workshops, live performances, food trucks including Nom Nom, Cool Haus and Pie and Burger, and an old-fashioned birthday cake. Pasadena Museum of California Art, 490 East Union St., Pasadena. 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sat. Free. (626) 568-3665; http://www.pmcaonline.org.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2011 | By Scarlet Cheng, Los Angeles Times
A century ago, the California Art Club was launched by a handful of European émigrés and plucky Americans who decided to make creativity their calling.  In those days, being an artist was not so fashionable a profession, but the founders included many now considered the greats of early California art such as Franz Bischoff, Hanson Puthuff and William Wendt.  In this post-Modern era, the club's emphasis on representational style and academic subject...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2010 | By CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, Art Critic
Anyone who has driven around Los Angeles in the last 50 years knows Millard Sheets' art, even if they don't know his name. For Home Savings of America, he designed the distinctive white marble branch banks and their artistic decorations, sometimes collaborating with others, starting in 1952. (Many of those buildings became branches of Washington Mutual and now Chase bank.) The stripped classicism of the architecture is enlivened by Sheets' specialty: stylized mosaic murals and wall reliefs.
HOME & GARDEN
December 26, 2009 | By Deborah Netburn
After seeing "Behold the Day: The Color Block Prints of Frances Gearhart," showing at the Pasadena Museum of California Art through Jan. 31, one may wonder why Gearhart isn't better known. Back in the 1930s, at the height of her career, she became one of the top color-block printmakers in America, displaying her work at the Smithsonian and the Brooklyn Museum, as well as at numerous shows on the West Coast. Even if her fame faded in the East, where her mountainous landscapes may not have resonated as much, one would expect her continued popularity in California, where she lived and worked until her death in 1958 at age 89. Over the course of her 30-year career, this Pasadena artist -- one of three sisters, none of them married, all of them teachers in the public school system, all of them artists and travelers -- became her own compelling, uplifting portrait of female achievement and independence.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2010 | By CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, Art Critic
Anyone who has driven around Los Angeles in the last 50 years knows Millard Sheets' art, even if they don't know his name. For Home Savings of America, he designed the distinctive white marble branch banks and their artistic decorations, sometimes collaborating with others, starting in 1952. (Many of those buildings became branches of Washington Mutual and now Chase bank.) The stripped classicism of the architecture is enlivened by Sheets' specialty: stylized mosaic murals and wall reliefs.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2009 | Hugh Hart
"This year alone, more data will be generated than in the cumulative history of humanity," says Dan Goods. "Stuff is being collected in all sorts of interesting forms and piling up somewhere. What do we do with it?" It's an apt question for the Too Much Information Age, and to address the query, Goods and co-curator David Delgado have rounded up a collection of geek-friendly installations on display through April 12 at Pasadena Museum of California Art's "Data + Art" exhibition.
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