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WORLD
March 16, 2014 | By Barbara Demick
The possibility that Malaysia Air Flight 370 was hijacked has heartened the relatives of passengers who are holding out hope that the missing plane landed in some remote location, perhaps a tropical island. "My gut feeling is that it landed. I still feel his spirit. I don't feel he is dead," said Sarah Bajc, a 48-year-old American teacher living in Beijing whose partner, Philip Wood, a 50-year-old IBM executive, was a passenger on the flight. A former technology executive, Bajc has been one of the most proactive of the family members, setting up Facebook and Twitter accounts encouraging people to keep looking for the plane.
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BUSINESS
April 2, 2014 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - Airline customers complain about being mistreated daily, but Rabbi S. Binyomin Ginsberg took his grievance all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. Unfortunately for Ginsberg, the court sided Wednesday with Northwest Airlines Inc., now merged into Delta Air Lines Inc., in a case that had put carriers on edge. The ruling strengthens the industry's hand when fighting litigation filed by disgruntled passengers by bolstering a 36-year-old federal law that limits its exposure to such claims.
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BUSINESS
December 22, 2009
New rules on delayed flights Under a directive announced by the Transportation Department, starting in April domestic airlines must: Allow passengers to return to the terminal if they have been stranded on the tarmac for more than three hours. The only exceptions are if safety or security reasons prohibit the plane from returning to the gate or if air traffic controllers advise against it. Provide food and water and access to a working bathroom after a plane has been delayed for more than two hours.
WORLD
March 25, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan, Ralph Vartabedian and Don Lee
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia - Calm seas returned Wednesday to aid the search for the missing Flight 370, but public protests and the first legal filing on behalf of a passenger hinted at a stormy forecast for Malaysia and its state-supported airline. Executives of Malaysia Airlines said Tuesday that they would pay at least $5,000 to each of the families of the 227 passengers aboard the Boeing 777 that disappeared March 8, but the gesture appeared to provide little comfort to distraught relatives, about 100 of whom marched to the Malaysian Embassy in Beijing, where some clashed with police.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
“Slim-line” seats, with thinner seat-back cushions, are increasingly popular with airlines because they weigh less and help squeeze more passengers into a plane. But the seats may not be so popular with passengers. A new survey by the travel website TripAdvisor shows that many passengers who have tried slim-line seats are not fans. In a survey of 1,391 travelers, the website found that nearly half weren't sure whether they had sat in slim-line seats. But of those who said they had tried the seats, 83% said they were less comfortable than traditional seats, 8% said the slim-line seats were more comfortable, and 9% said they couldn't tell the difference.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
Let them eat cake, says Korean Air. The Seoul-based airline hopes to sweeten the flying experience by offering free cake and cupcakes to passengers who are celebrating a wedding, honeymoon, birthday or some other special occasion during a flight. The cake service has been offered for months to passengers in Asian markets, and Korean Air recently began promoting the complimentary pastries to U.S. passengers. To get the onboard goodies, passengers must call a Korean Air agent at (800)
BUSINESS
October 13, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
An arms race is heating up among airlines battling to lure passengers with a taste for luxury. Etihad Airways fired a volley in the war recently when it announced that it is offering the services of nannies and onboard chefs on long-haul flights from Los Angeles. The chefs will serve made-to-order meals only for customers in the “diamond first class” seats, but the “Flying Nannies” will help clean, pamper and entertain children throughout the plane. “It's all about how to differentiate yourself for regular travelers,” Etihad president and chief executive James Hogan said about the new services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2013 | By Harriet Ryan
Passenger Elliott Stone, who was returning from a martial arts tournament in South Korea, told CNN that he was sitting in the middle of the Asiana jetliner when it crash-landed at San Francisco International Airport. “All of a sudden the engine is just off,” he said. He said that after a jolt, the plane seemed to tip over and then burst into flames. “Everyone was pushing, rushing out,” he said. While fire officials said emergency chutes deployed, Stone told CNN, “there wasn't any slides or anything.
NEWS
April 25, 1989
Robert Knisely, a Transportation Department official, told a congressional panel today that passengers, not the federal aviation trust fund, should pay for better aviation security.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
In the first such fine of an international carrier, the U.S. Department of Transportation has issued a $150,000 fine against Pakistan International Airlines for stranding passengers in Washington for more than four hours. Under federal rules, domestic airlines are prohibited from keeping passengers stranded on a grounded flight for more than three hours without allowing them to return to the terminal. On international flights, the limit is four hours. Airlines that violate the rules can be fined up to $27,500 per passenger.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Joe Mozingo
A Van Nuys man survived two nights in a canyon north of Castaic Lake after the pickup he was riding in plunged 250 feet off a winding mountain road, officials said. The 65-year-old driver of the 1995 GMC Sierra was killed, according to a report from the California Highway Patrol. His name was not released, pending notification of next of kin. The survivor, Alvaro Avila, 39, of Van Nuys, suffered a broken pelvis and internal injuries to his torso. Both men were wearing seat belts.
WORLD
March 16, 2014 | By Barbara Demick
The possibility that Malaysia Air Flight 370 was hijacked has heartened the relatives of passengers who are holding out hope that the missing plane landed in some remote location, perhaps a tropical island. "My gut feeling is that it landed. I still feel his spirit. I don't feel he is dead," said Sarah Bajc, a 48-year-old American teacher living in Beijing whose partner, Philip Wood, a 50-year-old IBM executive, was a passenger on the flight. A former technology executive, Bajc has been one of the most proactive of the family members, setting up Facebook and Twitter accounts encouraging people to keep looking for the plane.
WORLD
March 16, 2014 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING - The search for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 has expanded to cover an impossibly vast swath of Asia extending from Kazakhstan to Australia, with Malaysia appealing for as many airplanes and ships as the world can provide. The countries where the Boeing 777 and the 239 people aboard could have gone, based on a signal picked up by a satellite, stretch north and west from the plane's last known location and include Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Pakistan, Bangladesh, India, China, Myanmar, Laos, Vietnam and Thailand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - The 22-year-old driver of a speeding Jeep that went off Interstate 8 and down a steep embankment was killed but a passenger and baby survived, the CHP said Thursday. The woman was driving a Jeep at a "high rate of speed" Wednesday night in the Alpine area of eastern San Diego County when it swerved to avoid a slower-moving vehicle. She lost control of the Jeep as it went off the freeway and down about 150 feet of steep embankment, the California Highway Patrol said.
NATIONAL
March 13, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
A US Airways jet carrying 149 passengers and five crew members crashed in Philadelphia on Thursday evening after a tire blew out during takeoff and the plane's nose gear collapsed when the pilot decided to abort the flight, officials told the Los Angeles Times. Flight 1702 was headed to Fort Lauderdale, Fla., but the Airbus 320 jet instead saw its journey conclude at the end of a Philadelphia International Airport runway, where it skidded off the tarmac with its nose to the ground.
WORLD
March 11, 2014 | By Barbara Demick, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
BEIJING -- The passengers traveling on stolen passports on the vanished Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 were Iranians who authorities believe were trying to migrate to Europe. Malaysian Police Inspector General Khalid Abu Bakar on Tuesday told reporters that one of the men was Pouria Nour Mohammed Mehrdad, a 19-year-old whose mother was waiting for him in Frankfurt, Germany. She contacted authorities after the flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing was reported missing. “We believe he does not have any links to terrorism, and we believe he was just trying to migrate to Germany," Abu Bakar said at a news conference in Kuala Lumpur on Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2013 | By Kate Mather
In the aftermath of a shooting at LAX on Friday that left one Transportation Security Administration dead and three others wounded, stranded air travelers were trying to make new plans or find their way home. The roads are blocked off near the intersection of Century and Sepulveda boulevards, and one of the main thoroughfares into Los Angeles International Airport and freeways leading into the airport were also closed. Terminals 1 and 2 are slowly reopening, with airport employees and concessionaires being allowed to enter first.  Hundreds of people stood milling outside of the nearby Radisson hotel, spilling onto the sidewalk and into the street.
WORLD
March 11, 2014 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING - The disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 grew more puzzling Tuesday as reports suggested the plane may have veered more than 300 miles west of its intended flight path and flew lower and longer than previously thought. Although the flight from Kuala Lumpur, the Malaysian capital, to Beijing disappeared from civilian air traffic control screens at 1:30 a.m. Saturday, military sources told the Malaysian press that it was detected by the military at 2:40 a.m. over the Strait of Malacca - a narrow stretch of water off the west coast of the Malay peninsula.
WORLD
March 9, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- Forty ships and more than 20 airplanes were searching for a missing Malaysia Airlines jet Sunday but by nightfall had not found any wreckage, Malaysian authorities said. Meanwhile, Interpol confirmed that two stolen passports -- one Italian, one Austrian -- used by passengers on the plane had been entered into the agency's database following their thefts in Thailand in 2012 and 2013. However, the agency said no checks of those passport numbers were made by any country between the time they were entered into Interpol's database and the time that Flight MH370 departed Kuala Lumpur early Saturday.
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