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WORLD
March 8, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - As passengers' relatives waited for news on the Malaysian Airlines jet that went missing Saturday en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, reports emerged that military aircraft had spotted two oil slicks off southern Vietnam. The Associated Press reported that a Vietnamese government statement said the slicks were  each between 6 miles and 9 miles long.  The statement said the slicks were consistent with the kinds that would be left by fuel from a crashed jetliner. The Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 disappeared from radar screens with 239 people on board.
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WORLD
March 8, 2014 | By Julie Makinen and Richard A. Serrano
BEIJING - A massive search was underway Sunday for a missing Malaysia Airlines jetliner, focusing on a spot off the southern coast of Vietnam where two large oil slicks were reported. But there were, so far, no clues to why the China-bound flight vanished without warning with 239 people on board. Malaysian officials investigating the disappearance said they were not ruling out terrorism - or any other causes - as reports emerged that two Europeans listed on the passenger manifest were not aboard and their passports had been lost or stolen.
WORLD
March 7, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- A Malaysia Airlines flight carrying 239 people from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing remained missing hours after it lost contact with air traffic controllers Saturday, and a search-and-rescue effort was underway, officials said. Flight MH370, with 227 passengers and 12 crew members aboard, was scheduled to land in the Chinese capital at 6:30 a.m. but did not arrive. It departed from the Malaysian capital at 12:41 a.m. Saturday and lost contact with Malaysian air traffic controllers about two hours later, the airline said.
WORLD
March 7, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - A Malaysia Airlines flight carrying 239 people from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing remained missing hours after it lost contact with air traffic controllers Saturday, and a search-and-rescue effort was underway, officials said. Flight MH370, with 227 passengers and 12 crew members aboard, was scheduled to land in the Chinese capital at 6:30 a.m. but did not arrive. It departed from the Malaysian capital at 12:41 a.m. Saturday and lost contact with Malaysian air traffic controllers about two hours later, the airline said.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
As another harsh storm delays thousands of flights across the United States, a new study estimates that severe weather has cost airlines and passengers $5.8 billion this winter. More than 2,800 flights were canceled Monday and another 2,900 were delayed, mostly from airports on the East Coast, because of another severe winter storm that was moving east from the Tennessee Valley and the Mid-Atlantic states. It has been an unusually tough winter for the Midwest and East Coast. A study released Monday said flight delays and cancellations have cost travelers and airlines $5.8 billion from Dec. 1 to Feb. 28. PHOTOS: The 10 richest people in the world About 1 million flights have been canceled or delayed during that period, affecting 90 million travelers, according to a study by MasFlight, an aviation operations technology company based in Bethesda, Md. For passengers, the cancellations and delays have cost $5.3 billion in lost productivity and money spent on hotels, rental cars and food during holdovers, the study said.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
A food fight is breaking out in the airline industry. Airline seats and fares are so indistinguishable among the nation's major airlines that carriers often try to promote other services - such as onboard entertainment, food or airport lounges - to win over new passengers. “It's always been a fight for airlines to decommoditize what is largely a commodity,” said Seth Kaplan, a managing partner of the trade magazine Airline Weekly. Take for example, Virgin America, the California-based airline that recently announced a posh new menu for first-class fliers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2014 | By Ruben Vives
The California Highway Patrol has recommended a murder charge be filed against the owner of a "party bus" after a 24-year-old man fell out of it and died on the 101 Freeway last year in Studio City. The CHP submitted its traffic collision report for review last week in the incident in which Christopher "C.J. " Saraceno II lost his balance and fell down the steps of the 2001 Ford F-550. The L.A. County district attorney's office is considering filing criminal charges against Ayrapet Kasabyan, president of Hyros Corp., which operates Platinum Style Limousine Service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores and Richard Winton
The autopsy for a Grammy-award winning art director killed when a car driven by Salma Hayek's brother crashed found that the passenger died from the impact of the collision. Ian Cuttler Sala, 43, of New York died of multiple traumatic injuries from Sunday's crash, said Ed Winter, spokesman for the Los Angeles County coroner's office. Coroner's officials ruled the wreck an accident, but Los Angeles police said excessive speed and the winding road may have been factors. Sami Hayek, 40, was driving a Ford GT supercar in Beverly Crest on Sunday afternoon when he lost control on a curvy stretch of Sunset Boulevard near Mapleton Drive, crossed into the westbound lanes and collided with a Toyota Tacoma pickup truck.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | By Laura J. Nelson
Fare evasion along the Metro Orange Line has fallen significantly since law enforcement began a more aggressive campaign to check passengers' fares and issue citations and warnings, authorities said Tuesday.  The ratio of passengers riding the San Fernando Valley busway for free fell to 7% and ticket misuse fell to 5% after more Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department deputies began checking fares and doing it more frequently, officials said at...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2014 | By Kate Mather and Dan Weikel
Imposing the first penalty of its type, the federal government has fined Asiana Airlines $500,000 for failing to promptly help passengers and their families after last year's crash in San Francisco. A U.S. Department of Transportation investigation found that the South Korean airline violated the Foreign Air Carrier Family Support Act by taking up to five days to notify family members and failing to provide other basic assistance. In a statement issued Tuesday, federal officials said Asiana did not "adhere to the assurances in its family assistance plan," a federally mandated set of procedures foreign airlines must follow to promptly assist passengers and their families after major aircraft incidents.
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