Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPassengers
IN THE NEWS

Passengers

TRAVEL
January 13, 2014 | By Catharine Hamm
Question: I recently flew back to Los Angeles from New York on American Airlines. About two hours into the flight there was an announcement that all the onboard toilets, except for one in coach class, had stopped working, and so more than 150 passengers had to share one bathroom. How does this happen? Are there guidelines or regulations that airlines should follow in this situation? There was no mention of compensation of any kind, although I won't be flying AA again in this lifetime, so I'm not looking for that.
Advertisement
TRAVEL
January 10, 2014 | By Margo Pfeiff
GULF ISLANDS, Canada - "I'm not ashamed to say it," Colin Griffinson says, as he scans the island-dotted Strait of Georgia, "I have wooden boat disease!" And as he spins the very big wheel of his 1943 Pacific Yellowfin, one of a string of wooden boats the Dublin, Ireland-born captain and master carpenter has bought and restored over the years, he looks like a kid playing with his favorite toy. And so do we, eight passengers cruising British Columbia's Gulf Islands aboard this floating toy box stacked with mountain bikes, mopeds, kayaks, golf clubs, fishing rods, shotguns for skeet shooting and a water slide, with a hot tub on deck and a speed boat with wakeboards and water skis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
A former Los Angeles International Airport police officer who was convicted of sexually assaulting a female passenger while on duty is scheduled to be sentenced Thursday. On Nov. 18, a jury found Michael Wayne Staunton, 56, guilty of sexual battery by restraint, false imprisonment by fraud and assault by a peace officer, according to the Los Angeles County district attorney's office. Prosecutors said the assault occurred at LAX in April 2011 when Staunton was at a podium inside the security screening area for departures.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
The super cold storms punishing the Midwest and parts of the East Coast have already cost airlines and their passengers more than $1.4 billion in operating expenses and lost work time, according to a new study. The estimate comes from MasFlight, an aviation operations technology company based in Bethesda, Md. The company said it calculated the time lost by airlines and passengers caused by more than 19,000 canceled flights and nearly 76,000 delayed flights from Wednesday through Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Two Amtrak trains from California and a third from Illinois found themselves stuck in snow about 80 miles west of Chicago on Monday night, forcing hundreds of stranded passengers to spend the evening on board. Amtrak officials said the three trains - the California Zephyr from the San Francisco Bay Area, the Southwest Chief from Los Angeles and the local Illinois Zephyr - were carrying hundreds of passengers and were stopped because of too much ice and snow on the rails and bad conditions.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2014 | By Hugo Martín
Looking to save money and time, the airline industry has for years tried to come up with the fastest way to seat passengers. Some airlines board from the back of the plane to the front. Others seat passengers in the window seats first, then the middle seats and finally the aisle seats. Now an academic study suggests airlines could cut boarding time by seating passengers based on how many carry-on bags they are hauling. The study from Clarkson University School of Business in New York recognizes that a lot of boarding time is wasted as passengers shuffle around the cabin looking for space to stow their carry-on bags in the overhead compartment.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
Looking to save money and time, the airline industry has for years tried to come up with the fastest way to seat passengers. Some airlines board from the back of the plane to the front. Others seat passengers in the window seats first, then the middle seats and finally the aisle seats. Now an academic study suggests airlines could cut boarding time by seating passengers based on how many carry-on bags they are hauling. The study from Clarkson University School of Business in New York recognizes that a lot of boarding time is wasted as passengers shuffle around the cabin looking for space to stow their carry-on bags in the overhead compartment.
WORLD
January 2, 2014 | By Alexandra Zavis
A group of 52 scientists and tourists who had been stranded for more than week on an icebound ship in the Antarctic were airlifted to safety Thursday, Australian maritime authorities said. Taking advantage of calmer winds and improved visibility, a Chinese helicopter landed on a floe near the stricken Akademik Shokalskiy and transported the passengers in groups of 12 to an Australian icebreaker, according to the Australian Maritime Safety Authority's Rescue Coordination Centre , which oversaw the operation.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2013 | By Hugo Martín
A drunken man gets tackled by a group of off-duty cops in November while trying to storm the cockpit on a flight from Warsaw to Toronto. An inebriated passenger on a January flight from Iceland to New York tries to grope and choke fellow travelers until crew and passengers bind him with duct tape. Such incidents are no longer flukes but rather a trend that has prompted airlines to call for new laws to deal with unruly passengers and other mayhem on international flights. The number of incidents of unruly passengers has jumped from fewer than 500 in 2007 to more than 6,000 in 2011, according to the International Air Transport Assn., the trade group for world airlines, which has been keeping track of the incidents.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|