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NEWS
November 4, 2012
The oldest European word for noodle is itrion . In ancient Greece, itrion was a kind of tortilla flavored with sesame and honey, but some time before the 5th century, it evidently occurred to somebody that instead of frying your itrion in expensive sesame oil, you could boil it in plain water. This early sort of noodle was not eaten with sauce, like Italian pasta. Basically it was an extender for soups and bean dishes, though sometimes it was sweetened to make a cheap dessert.
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NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
Pasta and bread - not really the first dinner menu that comes to mind for people who don't eat gluten. But it was the husband's meal last night, thanks to gluten-free versions of both. The bread was a focaccia from Canyon Bakehouse, a popular brand of gluten-free breads usually found in the freezer cases at stores. The rosemary and thyme focaccia is made with brown rice and tapioca flours, extra virgin olive oil and other ingredients. It contains eggs, an allergen for some people.
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FOOD
July 10, 2013
Total time: 25 minutes Servings: 6 1 head broccoli (about 3/4 pound) 2 links fresh Italian sausage ( 1/4 to 1/2 pound) 2 tablespoons olive oil VIDEO: Click here to see a video of this recipe being made. 4 cloves garlic, minced 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes 1 pound dried short pasta, such as fusilli, penne, or ziti; or long dried pasta such as spaghetti Salt, pepper 1 ounce pecorino Romano cheese 1. Bring a large pot of liberally salted water to a boil.
NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Noelle Carter
It's Gluten-Free Wednesday. If you're like so many who crave pasta but need to stay away from wheat, fret no more. Check out these ideas: Rice noodle bowl with stir-fried beef: You can't go wrong here when you're craving a great noodle bowl. A fresh, crunchy salad is topped with a mound of noodles and richly flavored stir-fried beef. Garnish with fried shallots and peanuts and serve alongside a dipping sauce for a simple one-dish meal that comes together in about an hour.  Cashew cream fettuccine Alfredo: With its rich flavor, you might not guess this dish is both gluten-free and vegan!
FOOD
September 15, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times Restaurant Critic
Whenever Italian friends come to stay, I've noticed they can go at most three, maybe four days before they can't stand it anymore: They have to have some pasta. If that means cooking it at a campground or beside the road, so be it. This is comfort food at its most basic. And if there's nothing much in the cupboard, well then that's why aglio olio (garlic and olive oil) was invented. Or for that matter cacio e pepe (Pecorino Romano and lots of black pepper). Here are three places to get that pasta fix. Gusto Chef/owner Vic Casanova grew up in an Italian American neighborhood in the Bronx, cooked his way around New York and then headed west, where he launched the contemporary Italian restaurant Culina at the Four Seasons.
SPORTS
February 19, 2014 | By Nathan Fenno
Too much pasta landed three University of Oklahoma athletes on the wrong side of the NCAA rule book. The unusual case, first reported Wednesday by the Oklahoman, came after the trio attended a graduation banquet in 2013. To restore their eligibility, the athletes each had to donate $3.83 to charity to cover the cost of the pasta. The school reported the situation to the NCAA. "This is unusual," said John Infante, a former compliance director at Colorado State and Loyola Marymount who writes the Bylaw Blog.
FOOD
March 19, 2003
Total time: 1 1/2 hours Servings: 6 to 8 Note: Canned piquillo peppers can be found at Spanish markets or specialty stores. 2 pounds fresh spinach, tough stems removed 1 pound hot Italian sausage Salt 1 pound penne, shells or other hollow pasta 1/4 cup ( 1/2 stick) butter, plus more for pan 2 cloves garlic, minced Freshly grated nutmeg, to taste 1 cup chicken stock 2 cups heavy whipping cream 1/3 cup diced piquillo peppers (about 6)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1986
Your shared observations and my resultant laughter over your editorial (April 27), "Food for the Gods," deserves warm thanks. Mixing pasta, cats and love must have stirred a tremendous response, probably mostly in disagreement over your comment that cats are too dumb to appreciate pasta, preferring "foul-smelling cat food" instead. Our Abby, a little chubby, puts aside his characteristic musical meow and usual menu of "people-food aroma" diet, for a bellowing banter until he, too, shares in his human friend's pasta passion.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1989 | LAURIE OCHOA
In November, a front-page story in the Wall Street Journal announced it had gained cachet. Last month, Cook's magazine called it "The Pasta of the '90s." This isn't some boutique farmer's neat new invention. This is rice--you've heard of it. Most of the world has been hip to it for some time. In China, the Rice Measure symbolizes justice, mercy and virtue. In Hong Kong, social workers ferret out welfare cheats by snooping in applicants' rice bins to check the quality of rice stocked.
FOOD
July 25, 1996 | CHARLES PERRY
Perhaps because they felt themselves to be on the outskirts of civilization, medieval Turkish nomads were thrilled to learn that Alexander the Great had done some conquering in Central Asia. Although Alexander never actually reached the steppes where the medieval Turks roamed, they started telling legends about him.
SPORTS
February 19, 2014 | By Nathan Fenno
Too much pasta landed three University of Oklahoma athletes on the wrong side of the NCAA rule book. The unusual case, first reported Wednesday by the Oklahoman, came after the trio attended a graduation banquet in 2013. To restore their eligibility, the athletes each had to donate $3.83 to charity to cover the cost of the pasta. The school reported the situation to the NCAA. "This is unusual," said John Infante, a former compliance director at Colorado State and Loyola Marymount who writes the Bylaw Blog.
FOOD
January 25, 2014 | S. Irene Virbila
In Italy, it's so critical that the pasta be cooked right that I've seen a whole dinner party standing around the pot at the crucial moment to ensure the spaghetti wouldn't be overcooked. Some people prefer freshly made pasta, the more eggs the better. Others swear by dried pasta and insist on certain brands from Gragnano outside Naples. I say there's room for both. -- The Factory Kitchen Longtime Valentino chef Angelo Auriana is back in town as chef/partner in the Factory Kitchen downtown.
FOOD
October 26, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
I have gone through periods of excess when it comes to fresh pasta. When I first started making it many years ago, I got so carried away that I'd make fettuccine for dinner every night when I got home from work. It wasn't very good fettuccine, mind you - fresh pasta needs time to relax before rolling - but it was a whole lotta fettuccine. Lately I have found myself tipping back over that cliff again, making fresh pasta over and over. Here are some tips. Pick up a pasta roller attachment for a stand mixer.
FOOD
July 10, 2013
Total time: 25 minutes Servings: 6 1 head broccoli (about 3/4 pound) 2 links fresh Italian sausage ( 1/4 to 1/2 pound) 2 tablespoons olive oil VIDEO: Click here to see a video of this recipe being made. 4 cloves garlic, minced 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes 1 pound dried short pasta, such as fusilli, penne, or ziti; or long dried pasta such as spaghetti Salt, pepper 1 ounce pecorino Romano cheese 1. Bring a large pot of liberally salted water to a boil.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
Bob Klein has had his share of food passions. The owner of Oakland's Oliveto restaurant has been consumed by finding the best meat, fish, wine, and, of course, salumi (for years Fra' Mani's Paul Bertolli was his chef). And he was into the whole nose-to-tail thing way early. But now he's found a new love - wheat. And his Community Grains whole-grain pasta is popping up on menus and in stores around Southern California, including Mozza and Whole Foods, as well as online.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Isabella Alsobrook
For the month of June, I am only buying food that has never left a 100-mile radius of my house and, for the most part, it has been pretty great. The produce tastes delicious , I constantly meet people passionate about food, and I am stepping out of my comfort zone as a cook. Yet, there are times when being a locavore is a complete pain. Yes, it is frustrating not to be able to go out to eat and to have to grill each farmer to pinpoint where everything was grown, but I never anticipated the biggest challenges.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1993 | LAURIE OCHOA
Over on Third Street, the people who run Zucchero have solved the problem of distinguishing their restaurant from all the other Italian places by emphasizing a regional cuisine that has yet to really be discovered here: Sardinian food. The name (it means "sugar") and the blaring orange exterior would lead you to believe that Zucchero is yet another loud pizza and pasta cafe.
NEWS
July 15, 1988 | Associated Press
Italy's "pasta purity" law was overturned Thursday, opening the door to imports from other European countries and touching off warnings of an invasion of mushy macaroni. The European Economic Community's Court of Justice in Luxembourg ruled that Italy cannot ban imports under its 1967 law that required all pasta to be made with durum wheat. Pasta made of durum wheat is more firm but also more expensive than pasta made from other kinds of wheat.
NEWS
May 16, 2013
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FOOD
April 13, 2013
  2 hours. Serves 6 2 cups chicken broth 2 cups water 2 cloves garlic, sliced 1 1/2 to 2 ounces rinds from Parmigiano-Reggiano Herb trimmings Salt 2 dozen asparagus tips 1/2 pound sugar snap peas Goat cheese ravioli or fresh pasta squares 2 tablespoons chopped chives 1 ounce freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano 1. In a soup pot, simmer the chicken broth, water, garlic, Parmesan rinds and herb...
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