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Pasta

NEWS
May 24, 1990 | NIKKI FINKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a rare day when Frank Sinatra smiles at reporters and photographers. It's an even rarer day when Frank Sinatra talks to reporters and poses for photographers. But that's exactly what happened Tuesday night when he introduced his signature spaghetti sauce Artanis (Sinatra spelled backwards) to Southern California supermarkets. Of course, the kick-off celebration wasn't held at Vons or Ralphs. This is the Chairman of the Board, after all.
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FOOD
September 2, 2009 | David Ross
Duck confit, pancetta-wrapped quail, butter-poached lobster tails, fried zucchini blossoms -- not exactly how most collegians are expecting to dine when they head back to their school dormitories this fall. But those are some of the dishes that may again delight the denizens of Norris Hall at Occidental College in Eagle Rock come this semester. Occidental junior Saul Sutcher is heading back to school with his '87 Volvo packed full of his cooking equipment and dishes. Without objection from the school administration, he'll again be setting up for Café Norris, preparing three-course gourmet meals served in the dormitory's common room most Saturday nights.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2009
Re: "How I Made It: Mario Batali," Sept. 20: It's appalling for celebrity chef Batali to say, "Our check averages are under $100 . . . and you can always get a bowl of pasta for $15 to $18." He is obviously clueless about what the rest of the nation is experiencing during this recession. Vicky Hoffman Los Angeles
NEWS
March 1, 1992
KCAL's show "Grudge Match" (Sat., 11 p.m.) is about as amusing as watching my parents' home videos. And between the show's submarine sandwich and pasta fights, much food is wasted which could be used to feed the homeless. Thumbs down! Alli Magidsohn, Northridge
NEWS
October 31, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
An Italian phrase, al dente literally means "to the tooth. " The term is often used in recipes to refer to the texture a food should have when it is cooked -- most notably pasta -- but also with rice and sometimes vegetables. To check for an al dente texture with pasta and rice as you're cooking, take a noodle or grain out of the pot and bite into it. The outer layer of the pasta or rice should be fully cooked, but with a very thin dot of white in the center; the texture should be soft but firm.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Isabella Alsobrook
For the month of June, I am only buying food that has never left a 100-mile radius of my house and, for the most part, it has been pretty great. The produce tastes delicious , I constantly meet people passionate about food, and I am stepping out of my comfort zone as a cook. Yet, there are times when being a locavore is a complete pain. Yes, it is frustrating not to be able to go out to eat and to have to grill each farmer to pinpoint where everything was grown, but I never anticipated the biggest challenges.
FOOD
October 13, 2011
Mac 'n' cheese with soubise Total time: 1½ hours Servings: 6 Note: Adapted from Michael Ruhlman's "Ruhlman's Twenty. " Soubise 1/4 cup (½ stick) butter, divided 1 onion, sliced Kosher salt 1 shallot, roughly chopped 3 tablespoons flour 1 1/2 cups milk 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar 3 tablespoons sherry 1 tablespoon fish sauce 1 to 2 teaspoons dry mustard 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 6 or 7 gratings of fresh nutmeg 1/4 teaspoon cayenne or smoked paprika 1. Melt half the butter in a medium pan over medium heat and add the onion and a four-fingered pinch (about one-fourth teaspoon)
NEWS
November 15, 1986 | JEANNINE STEIN, Times Staff Writer
At 1 a.m. most of downtown L.A is shut up like a clam, except for one spot of warmth in the desolate warehouse district--called Gorky's. Gorky's is a 24-hour "Russian" cafe that draws bums and trendoids alike to its funky insides where original art hangs on the walls and live music--everything from classical to folk to jazz--is played. On a recent night a reggae band had finished its set, but the lead singer stayed to play guitar and sing classic rock 'n' roll tunes.
NEWS
June 10, 1987 | United Press International
The Japanese attending the Venice economic summit have done the legend of Marco Polo one better this week in bringing their own brand of pasta to Italy: instant noodles. The popular Japanese "cup noodles," with hot water added to make a quick meal in seafood, curry, beef and other flavors, have been available in the summit's Japan press center for the more than 200 Japanese reporters covering the gathering.
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