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Pat Kingsley

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MAGAZINE
September 4, 1988
"Hollywood's Powerful Image Machine" (July 10) makes it clear that Pat Kingsley demands and gets control over press coverage of her celebrity clients. Author Michael Cieply, however, avoids answering the obvious: Would Kingsley have allowed her interview to run without a cover? Did she have final photograph approval? I doubt that Kingsley would ever relinquish her power--even to the Los Angeles Times. SHIRLEY PARKER Sherman Oaks
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BUSINESS
September 27, 2007 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
Pat Kingsley, the grande dame of Hollywood spin, is stepping down as chairwoman and chief executive of the public relations firm she led for nearly three decades. Kingsley's position at PMK/HBH will be assumed by partners Cindi Berger, who began her career as a receptionist in the firm's New York office 24 years ago, and Simon Halls, who was a founding partner of Huvane Baum Halls before it merged with PMK in 2001.
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BUSINESS
September 27, 2007 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
Pat Kingsley, the grande dame of Hollywood spin, is stepping down as chairwoman and chief executive of the public relations firm she led for nearly three decades. Kingsley's position at PMK/HBH will be assumed by partners Cindi Berger, who began her career as a receptionist in the firm's New York office 24 years ago, and Simon Halls, who was a founding partner of Huvane Baum Halls before it merged with PMK in 2001.
MAGAZINE
November 2, 1997
When Pat Kingsley arrived in Hollywood, I was already in independent public relations, an alumnus of 20th Century Fox, where the late Harry Brand (husband of Sybil) taught us publicists to befriend the press ("Don't Let the Smile Fool You," by Hilary de Vries, Sept. 14). Kingsley showed all of us another approach: Protect the stars from the press. Decide when and where they will be interviewed. Keep a distance between their lives and the lives of those in the media. Give the celebrities more time and opportunities to a life away from the press.
MAGAZINE
July 10, 1988 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, Michael Cieply is a Times staff writer who covers the entertainment industry.
(Beep.) " Paaat? " " What? " " Sally Field on 1. " " I'll call back. " The clock ticks. Ninety minutes pass. Pat Kingsley still doesn't call back, even though Sally Field is a friend and valued client--proving there is truth in the lore that Patricia Kingsley, celebrity publicist, can be a very difficult woman to reach. Of course, she doesn't see it quite that way.
MAGAZINE
September 14, 1997 | Hilary de Vries
When Charlie Chaplin won his honorary Oscar in 1972, Pat Kingsley was at his side backstage. When Courtney Love transformed herself from a drug-using punk rocker to a svelte Oscar contender, that was Kingsley's doing. Ellen DeGeneres' revelation that, yep, she was gay? Kingsley's fingerprints were all over that one, too.
SPORTS
August 21, 1997 | T.J. SIMERS
Pat Kingsley makes her living as a partner for PMK, a Los Angeles-area public-relations firm, advising high-powered Hollywood clients such as Tom Cruise and Michelle Pfeiffer how to maintain and improve their public image. Asked about the star-studded Dallas Cowboys, who are trying to spruce up their tarnished reputation, Kingsley said, "It's not working. "I always thought of the Cowboys as America's Team, going back to players such as Roger Staubach. What's happening now saddens me."
MAGAZINE
November 2, 1997
When Pat Kingsley arrived in Hollywood, I was already in independent public relations, an alumnus of 20th Century Fox, where the late Harry Brand (husband of Sybil) taught us publicists to befriend the press ("Don't Let the Smile Fool You," by Hilary de Vries, Sept. 14). Kingsley showed all of us another approach: Protect the stars from the press. Decide when and where they will be interviewed. Keep a distance between their lives and the lives of those in the media. Give the celebrities more time and opportunities to a life away from the press.
MAGAZINE
September 14, 1997 | Hilary de Vries
When Charlie Chaplin won his honorary Oscar in 1972, Pat Kingsley was at his side backstage. When Courtney Love transformed herself from a drug-using punk rocker to a svelte Oscar contender, that was Kingsley's doing. Ellen DeGeneres' revelation that, yep, she was gay? Kingsley's fingerprints were all over that one, too.
SPORTS
August 21, 1997 | T.J. SIMERS
Pat Kingsley makes her living as a partner for PMK, a Los Angeles-area public-relations firm, advising high-powered Hollywood clients such as Tom Cruise and Michelle Pfeiffer how to maintain and improve their public image. Asked about the star-studded Dallas Cowboys, who are trying to spruce up their tarnished reputation, Kingsley said, "It's not working. "I always thought of the Cowboys as America's Team, going back to players such as Roger Staubach. What's happening now saddens me."
MAGAZINE
September 4, 1988
Kingsley is described as "a fierce guardian of one of the 1980s' most precious commodities--access to the stars." Well, nothing has changed in the standard operating procedure of the celebrity publicity world! During the 1950s and 1960s, we publicists, too, guarded that precious commodity. But we weren't fierce--in fact, we were pussycats compared to the apparent tigers today. And we had a realistic goal: mutual cooperation between press and press agents--neither much good without the other.
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