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Pat Senatore

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1990 | ZAN STEWART
Bassist Pat Senatore has played with some pretty big names in jazz and pop--Stan Kenton, Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass, Les Brown and the VIP Trio with pianist Cedar Walton and drummer Billy Higgins. There's little doubt in Senatore's mind that his shining hour was as the proprietor/house bandleader/chief bottle washer of Pasquale's, which from 1978 until it closed in October, 1983, was one of the Los Angeles area's best-known jazz rooms.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1997 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bassist Pat Senatore is a youthful 61-year-old who has played a ton of good music in his life. Among his ace associations: Stan Kenton's Orchestra, Herb Alpert's Tijuana Brass, the V.I.P. Trio with Cedar Walton and Billy Higgins, and more than occasional performances with such esteemed jazz men as pianists George Cables, Roger Kellaway and Billy Childs, saxophonists Joe Henderson and Joe Farrell and trumpeter Freddie Hubbard.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1992 | LEONARD FEATHER, Leonard Feather writes regularly about jazz for The Times.
Nostalgic notes will flow from the bandstand Thursday at the Jazz Bakery in Culver City. Produced by singer Ruth Price, the evening will be at once a 57th birthday tribute to bassist Pat (Pasquale) Senatore and a reunion celebration recalling Pasquale's, the now legendary beachside club that he ran from 1978 to 1983. Alumni of the club expected to perform include Price, pianist George Cables and drummer Billy Higgins.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1992 | LEONARD FEATHER, Leonard Feather writes regularly about jazz for The Times.
Nostalgic notes will flow from the bandstand Thursday at the Jazz Bakery in Culver City. Produced by singer Ruth Price, the evening will be at once a 57th birthday tribute to bassist Pat (Pasquale) Senatore and a reunion celebration recalling Pasquale's, the now legendary beachside club that he ran from 1978 to 1983. Alumni of the club expected to perform include Price, pianist George Cables and drummer Billy Higgins.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1997 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bassist Pat Senatore is a youthful 61-year-old who has played a ton of good music in his life. Among his ace associations: Stan Kenton's Orchestra, Herb Alpert's Tijuana Brass, the V.I.P. Trio with Cedar Walton and Billy Higgins, and more than occasional performances with such esteemed jazz men as pianists George Cables, Roger Kellaway and Billy Childs, saxophonists Joe Henderson and Joe Farrell and trumpeter Freddie Hubbard.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
The good news is that Pasquale (Pat) Senatore is back in business--and this time under weatherproof conditions, unlike those he had to deal with at the Oceanside Club that bore his name. To musicians, Senatore is best known as a bass player who toured the world with Stan Kenton, Les Brown and, for five years, the Tijuana Brass. But the Southland's public may remember him better as the man who, from 1978 until 1983, owned Pasquale's, overlooking the beach at Malibu.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1988 | DEBORAH CAULFIELD, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The fate of Donte's, which was to have reopened as a refurbished jazz club after its recent sale to Japanese businessman Ken Akemoto, is now in doubt. Pat Senatore--hired by Akemoto as musical director--said this week that the businessman told him he'd changed his mind about reopening Donte's and would instead put the property back on the market. Donte's closed April 2 after almost 22 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1998 | Karla Perez-Villalta
AGING SEMINAR: Adat Ari El and Valley Storefront Jewish Family Service will present a free seminar, "You and Your Aging Parent," from 10 a.m. to noon Sunday at Adat Ari El, 12020 Burbank Blvd., North Hollywood. Led by Rena Snyder, a licensed clinical social worker, the seminar will cover such topics as dementia, day-care programs, separation of assets and Medi-Cal eligibility. Information: (818) 984-1380.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
Is everybody down and out in Beverly Hills? If not, how does one explain that the presence Friday at Le Bouvier's Beverly Hills Saloon of Joe Pass, who has packed the great concert halls of the world, attracted half a house? It was not the happiest of occasions for the guitarist, playing the first evening of a two-night stand.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1990 | DON HECKMAN
Wilbur Brown is a veteran of the jazz wars who still seems willing and able to fight a few more battles. At 58, his tenor saxophone playing resonates with the powerful energies of nearly five decades of inventive mainstream improvising. Brown was at Legends of Hollywood on Saturday night and the Cat and Fiddle Pub on Sunday--a typical weekend for a player who has had a highly active, but remarkably low profile in the Los Angeles jazz community.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1990 | ZAN STEWART
Bassist Pat Senatore has played with some pretty big names in jazz and pop--Stan Kenton, Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass, Les Brown and the VIP Trio with pianist Cedar Walton and drummer Billy Higgins. There's little doubt in Senatore's mind that his shining hour was as the proprietor/house bandleader/chief bottle washer of Pasquale's, which from 1978 until it closed in October, 1983, was one of the Los Angeles area's best-known jazz rooms.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
The good news is that Pasquale (Pat) Senatore is back in business--and this time under weatherproof conditions, unlike those he had to deal with at the Oceanside Club that bore his name. To musicians, Senatore is best known as a bass player who toured the world with Stan Kenton, Les Brown and, for five years, the Tijuana Brass. But the Southland's public may remember him better as the man who, from 1978 until 1983, owned Pasquale's, overlooking the beach at Malibu.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2000 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When musicians form a new band, they often struggle with finding an identity, a group sound. Trio Lesentu dealt with the problem by becoming a democratic combo, in which everyone has an equal say. "Rather than be a trio where the pianist was spotlighted, we wanted this to be a group effort, where the music came first," said bassist Pat Senatore.
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