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BUSINESS
October 9, 2005 | Leslie Earnest, Times Staff Writer
Yvon Chouinard has climbed a glacier on the face of Mt. Kenya, survived an avalanche on Minya Konka in Tibet and kayaked down the Yellowstone River through a treacherous rock wall canyon. He has also helped preserve millions of acres of wild lands in the U.S. and South America -- all this on top of building an outdoor apparel business with $240 million in sales. But the founder and chairman of Ventura-based Patagonia Inc.
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TRAVEL
April 3, 2005
Al Schuh of Santa Clarita waited for a break in the weather to take this shot in Torres del Paine National Park in Chile's Patagonia region. He and his wife, Carrie, planned their vacation for March, which they had heard offered a respite from the rain and high winds. "But this year, we brought the rain with us," Schuh says. On their second day, he was able to take this photo of one of the world's greatest parks, from the back door of their lodge.
TRAVEL
March 2, 2003 | Anne Broyles, Special to The Times
Valdes Peninsula, Argentina The great whale's breath exploded through two blowholes on top of its head, punctuating the stillness of a winter day. Doradillo Beach's grand expanse was empty, save for a few hardy souls who stood on the sand at low tide watching southern right whales cavort in Golfo Nuevo off the Argentine coast. "We've counted over 130 whales already this morning," a volunteer at the Doradillo Beach whale-watch station told us.
TRAVEL
December 29, 2002 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Does homemaking abroad really deserve its own literary genre? Clearly the reading public thinks so, as evidenced by brisk sales of Peter Mayle (who has made a career of writing about his French residency since 1990's "A Year in Provence") and Frances Mayes (who gave her home in Italy similar treatment in 1996's "Under the Tuscan Sun" and sequels). Maybe, given the success of those two and many others in their wake, it was inevitable that anthologies would follow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2002 | FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Patagonia has done it again. Months after being named one of the best companies to work for in America by Fortune magazine, the Ventura-based outdoor clothing maker has been awarded a similar honor by Working Mother magazine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2002 | FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maybe it was the organic food dished out at Patagonia's cafeteria that swayed Fortune magazine. Or maybe it was the on-site child care, company-sponsored training sessions in nonviolent civil disobedience or the $2,000 employee incentive to buy environmentally friendly vehicles.
NEWS
May 15, 2000 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spring tiptoes late into Eve Jursch's valley, with a blush of blossoms in the meadow, a hint of basil in the soil. A recovering CEO, Jursch is an organic farmer now. Eight years after she moved here alone, her life has slowed to the rhythm of the seasons and pivots with the turn of each day. She spends most of her time running this 20-acre farm. But she still works; once a week she commutes to Ventura. In November, she stepped down from a plum job as CEO of Patagonia Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1999 | GAIL DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Environmental activism, good working conditions in overseas factories and innovative day care are a few reasons Patagonia has won a prestigious apparel industry award. The Ventura-based outdoor clothing company will receive Apparel Industry Magazine's All-Star Award this week in New York. The award recognizes clothing companies that influence the industry, said Andree Conrad, editor of the magazine. Past winners include Calvin Klein, Hugo Boss and Jones New York.
NEWS
April 18, 1999 | MALCOLM RITTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Millions of years ago, before the Andes Mountains rose to the west and the Atlantic Ocean grew wide to the east, dinosaurs bigger than city buses gathered here by the hundreds to lay their eggs. Something lured them to this place year after year, but at a terrible price. The rivers flooded again and again, covering the eggs and drowning the embryos within. Over eons, deposits of mud buried the eggs so deep that it seemed their story would be swallowed by the earth.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1998 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Californians gingerly test the new competitive retail market for electricity, there appears to be a strong appetite for the wholesome option of renewable energy, even though it means paying more. By one estimate, marketers of "green" electricity have captured more than one-quarter of the 95,000 or so customers who have switched from their investor-owned utilities to other electricity providers.
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