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Patagonia

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1997
Necessity may be the mother of invention, but for many working women, motherhood necessitates whole new levels of inventiveness to balance the conflicting responsibilities of family, work and self. Some companies add to that challenge with attitudes and policies rooted in the "Leave It to Beaver" era. But others have long since realized that a little creative support can do a lot to improve productivity, morale and company loyalty. Two of the best are headquartered in Ventura County.
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TRAVEL
November 3, 1996 | KARIN DOMINELLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Explore the southwestern section of remote Torres del Paine National Park in southern Chile. Trip dates are Feb. 7 to 17. High Country Trekkers of Studio City will establish a base camp and participants can make day hikes to such places as Grey Glacier and French Valley. Without backpacks and the daily routine of setting up and taking down tents, participants will have more time for photographing and relaxing.
BUSINESS
May 14, 1996 | BARBARA MURPHY
Deckers Outdoor Corp., a footwear manufacturer, has signed a five-year lease for the building being vacated by Patagonia in Ventura. Deckers, which wants to expand and consolidate its area distribution activities, is scheduled to move into the 125,511-square-foot building at 4880 Colt Ave. on June 1. It was represented in the transaction by The Seeley Co.'s Ventura County office. With the move, Deckers is consolidating its warehouses in Ventura and Camarillo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1996 | STEPHANIE BROMMER
Patagonia Inc. announced Wednesday that it has named David B. Olsen of San Diego as the outdoor-clothing company's new chief executive officer. Olsen, who was president of Peak Power Corp., a subsidiary of Magma Power Co., will move to Ventura and begin his job with Patagonia on June 3. Olsen had been responsible for worldwide marketing and business development for Magma Power, which generates electricity from geothermal energy.
BUSINESS
April 2, 1996 | LEO SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Patagonia, the Ventura-based manufacturer of outdoor clothing, has begun moving merchandise from its Ventura distribution center to its new Reno Service Center. The move to the 170,000-square-foot Nevada location, announced last year, will be completed by mid-July, said Patagonia spokeswoman Lu Setnicka. Patagonia, a division of Lost Arrow Corp., will continue to house its administrative headquarters in Ventura.
BUSINESS
December 19, 1995 | LEO SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Alba Alargunsoro isn't sure how to describe her new line of women's clothing. "If you say 'dressy,' people think it's just evening clothes," said the owner of the Alba label. "When you say 'designer,' people think it's very expensive. I think everybody can afford my clothes." Alargunsoro introduced her Alba line of three-piece rayon outfits, priced from about $80 to $110, at last week's grand opening of her small Ventura showroom in the industrial area of Bunsen Avenue off Victoria Avenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1995 | LINDA FRIEDLIEB
Patagonia plans no layoffs in the wake of a recent fire at one of the Ventura clothing company's largest suppliers of synthetic fleece, a spokeswoman said Thursday. "We're confident about no layoffs," said spokeswoman Lu Setnicka. Malden Mills Industries supplies Patagonia with large quantities of synchilla, a fleece-like polyester material. Solid-colored synchilla is manufactured from recycled soda bottles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1995 | LINDA FRIEDLIEB
Most people in Ventura recycle aluminum cans, plastic, glass and paper. Patagonia is recycling a building. The building's steel shell will go to the Oglala-Sioux reservation in South Dakota, said Paul Furtaw, the company's facilities coordinator. The roof tiles were handed over to a contractor for reuse; the concrete slab will be part of a local effort to combat erosion in a river bed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1995 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's one of those perfect, sunny afternoons, a time when most working stiffs are tethered to their desks, and Patagonia's founder, Yvon Chouinard, is pushing the limits of a wave peeling across an empty beach. The wave isn't that big, shoulder high perhaps. Still, it's powerful enough to snap Chouinard's surfboard and slam him into the sand. Chouinard comes up sputtering, but unfazed. The board's nose dangles limp and useless, like a broken limb.
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