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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2004 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
Surgeons at Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center mistakenly left a metal clamp the length of a ballpoint pen inside a patient two weeks ago -- another in a series of lapses to occur despite the hospital's vows to fix failings in patient care. The clamp was left inside the unidentified patient during emergency trauma surgery for multiple gunshot wounds at the Los Angeles County-owned hospital.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
State inspectors making a surprise follow-up visit to UC Irvine Medical Center last week found two deficiencies in "medication management" and issued an "immediate jeopardy" warning, alleging that patient care was at risk, hospital officials acknowledged Thursday. The warning, which was lifted Wednesday, is one of the most serious that can be issued to a hospital. UC Irvine Medical Center's chief executive, Terry A. Belmont, disclosed the findings by state inspectors working on behalf of the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in e-mails sent to the staff this week and last week.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2007 | Daniel Costello, Times Staff Writer
As he piloted his new, $1.4-million helicopter from his Apple Valley home to Orange County one recent morning, Dr. Prem Reddy enjoyed a cloudless view of his growing empire. Today, the five-seat Eurocopter EC120 whisks him to Anaheim, where he recently agreed to buy two hospitals. On other days, he sweeps over endless miles of gridlock to his facilities in Sherman Oaks, Huntington Beach and San Diego.
HEALTH
September 13, 2012 | By Karen Ravn
Until now, doctors have pretty much called the shots in the doctor-patient relationship. But change is on the way. Patients, say ahhhhh - it's about to be all about you. The new approach is called patient-centered care, and it's a very good thing, according to Dr. James Rickert, the founder and president of the Society for Patient Centered Orthopedics in Bedford, Ind. "It will mean better outcomes, more satisfied patients and lower costs," he...
BUSINESS
November 28, 2012 | By Chad Terhune, Los Angeles Times
A national report card on patient safety gave a failing grade to Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, one of the country's most prestigious hospitals and one of only 25 nationwide to receive such low marks. In a report issued Wednesday, the Leapfrog Group, an employer-backed nonprofit group focused on healthcare quality, gave a letter grade of F to UCLA Medical Center for performing poorly on several measures tied to preventing medical errors, patient infections and deaths. Leapfrog withheld a failing grade for UCLA in June when it released its first-ever hospital safety scores to give low-performing hospitals time to show improvement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2013 | By Anna Gorman and Anthony York, Los Angeles Times
In a office decorated with Chinese art and diagrams of body parts, Dr. George Ma cares for more than 4,000 patients. Nearly three-quarters are covered by Medi-Cal, the state's public insurance program for low-income Californians, and Ma said he receives $10 a month to treat most of them. This summer, when California makes a controversial 10% cut to Medi-Cal rates, he could get paid less. Ma said he didn't go into safety net medicine for the money, but he worries that the reductions will make it even harder for his patients to get medication, medical equipment and appointments with specialists.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Chemed Corp., which owns plumbing and drain-cleaning service Roto-Rooter, agreed to sell its Patient Care Inc. unit to investors led by Schroder Ventures Life Sciences Group for $70 million in cash. Patient Care sells home health-care services mostly in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, Chemed said. The unit had $139.2million in sales last year. The sale of Patient Care will allow Chemed to concentrate on its maintenance and repair business, Chief Executive Kevin McNamara said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1988 | From Times staff and wire reports
The number of times a doctor is paged in the hospital could be reduced by as much as 42%, giving physicians more time to rest and spend uninterrupted time with patients. Drs. Mitchell Katz and Steven Schroeder of UC San Francisco studied the paging system at three hospitals during three-day periods between February and June, 1987.
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