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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2004 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
Surgeons at Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center mistakenly left a metal clamp the length of a ballpoint pen inside a patient two weeks ago -- another in a series of lapses to occur despite the hospital's vows to fix failings in patient care. The clamp was left inside the unidentified patient during emergency trauma surgery for multiple gunshot wounds at the Los Angeles County-owned hospital.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
State inspectors making a surprise follow-up visit to UC Irvine Medical Center last week found two deficiencies in "medication management" and issued an "immediate jeopardy" warning, alleging that patient care was at risk, hospital officials acknowledged Thursday. The warning, which was lifted Wednesday, is one of the most serious that can be issued to a hospital. UC Irvine Medical Center's chief executive, Terry A. Belmont, disclosed the findings by state inspectors working on behalf of the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in e-mails sent to the staff this week and last week.
HEALTH
September 13, 2012 | By Karen Ravn
Until now, doctors have pretty much called the shots in the doctor-patient relationship. But change is on the way. Patients, say ahhhhh - it's about to be all about you. The new approach is called patient-centered care, and it's a very good thing, according to Dr. James Rickert, the founder and president of the Society for Patient Centered Orthopedics in Bedford, Ind. "It will mean better outcomes, more satisfied patients and lower costs," he...
BUSINESS
November 28, 2012 | By Chad Terhune, Los Angeles Times
A national report card on patient safety gave a failing grade to Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, one of the country's most prestigious hospitals and one of only 25 nationwide to receive such low marks. In a report issued Wednesday, the Leapfrog Group, an employer-backed nonprofit group focused on healthcare quality, gave a letter grade of F to UCLA Medical Center for performing poorly on several measures tied to preventing medical errors, patient infections and deaths. Leapfrog withheld a failing grade for UCLA in June when it released its first-ever hospital safety scores to give low-performing hospitals time to show improvement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2012 | By Lee Romney and John Hoeffel, Los Angeles Times
A consultant who led the troubled effort to overhaul California's public psychiatric hospitals has played a lead role in federal reforms in at least five other states, where critics have raised similar concerns about cronyism and the quality of his work. Nirbhay Singh, a psychologist from Virginia, abruptly resigned from his California post last year after The Times asked state officials about rising violence in the hospitals and the state's hiring of Singh's family members. State mental health officials are now eliminating treatment approaches and elaborate paperwork that Singh imposed in a costly effort to satisfy a legal settlement between the state and the U.S. Department of Justice.
NEWS
February 13, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
A satisfied patient is not a cheaper patient: however important such a finding may be in these budget-constrained times, that comes as little surprise. More unexpected is the finding that a satisfied patient is not necessarily a healthier patient -- that the patient happy with the medical attention he or she receives from a physician is more likely to die than the patient who grumbles about it. Yet both findings emerge from a study published "online first" on Monday in the Archives of Internal Medicine . The authors -- four family medicine doctors at UC Davis -- suggest that in a healthcare marketplace in which Americans often choose their doctors in the same way they choose a plumber or an electrician, physicians may have gotten a little too eager to please their "customers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2013 | By Anna Gorman and Anthony York, Los Angeles Times
In a office decorated with Chinese art and diagrams of body parts, Dr. George Ma cares for more than 4,000 patients. Nearly three-quarters are covered by Medi-Cal, the state's public insurance program for low-income Californians, and Ma said he receives $10 a month to treat most of them. This summer, when California makes a controversial 10% cut to Medi-Cal rates, he could get paid less. Ma said he didn't go into safety net medicine for the money, but he worries that the reductions will make it even harder for his patients to get medication, medical equipment and appointments with specialists.
BUSINESS
August 10, 2012 | By Chad Terhune
Nonprofit insurer Blue Shield of California said it resolved a lengthy contract dispute with UCLA and other UC system hospitals over reimbursements for patient care. Effective Sept. 1, Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center and the Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center and Orthopaedic Hospital will be back in the Blue Shield network. The San Francisco health insurer said this new contract with all UC providers statewide runs through June 30, 2015. The previous contract expired Dec. 31 as the two sides bickered over rising medical costs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Larry Gordon
The union representing the University of California's 21,000 service workers and patient care employees has scheduled a five-day strike starting March 3 -- which would be their third and longest walkout in less than a year. Unless a contract with UC is settled before March 3, AFSCME Local 3299 said its 8,300 food workers, custodians, gardeners and other service workers at UC's 10 campuses and five medical centers would walk out for those five days next month. The union's 13,000 patient care technical workers, such as respiratory therapists, would strike in sympathy, according to a union statement issued Thursday.
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