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BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By Chad Terhune
University of California regents agreed to pay $10 million to the former chairman of UCLA's orthopedic surgery department, who had alleged that the well-known medical school allowed doctors to take industry payments that may have compromised patient care. The settlement reached Tuesday in Los Angeles County Superior Court came just before closing arguments were due to begin in a whistleblower-retaliation case brought by Dr. Robert Pedowitz, 54, a surgeon who was recruited to UCLA in 2009 to run the orthopedic surgery department.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
State inspectors making a surprise follow-up visit to UC Irvine Medical Center last week found two deficiencies in "medication management" and issued an "immediate jeopardy" warning, alleging that patient care was at risk, hospital officials acknowledged Thursday. The warning, which was lifted Wednesday, is one of the most serious that can be issued to a hospital. UC Irvine Medical Center's chief executive, Terry A. Belmont, disclosed the findings by state inspectors working on behalf of the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in e-mails sent to the staff this week and last week.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2007 | Daniel Costello, Times Staff Writer
As he piloted his new, $1.4-million helicopter from his Apple Valley home to Orange County one recent morning, Dr. Prem Reddy enjoyed a cloudless view of his growing empire. Today, the five-seat Eurocopter EC120 whisks him to Anaheim, where he recently agreed to buy two hospitals. On other days, he sweeps over endless miles of gridlock to his facilities in Sherman Oaks, Huntington Beach and San Diego.
HEALTH
September 13, 2012 | By Karen Ravn
Until now, doctors have pretty much called the shots in the doctor-patient relationship. But change is on the way. Patients, say ahhhhh - it's about to be all about you. The new approach is called patient-centered care, and it's a very good thing, according to Dr. James Rickert, the founder and president of the Society for Patient Centered Orthopedics in Bedford, Ind. "It will mean better outcomes, more satisfied patients and lower costs," he...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2012 | By Lee Romney and John Hoeffel, Los Angeles Times
A consultant who led the troubled effort to overhaul California's public psychiatric hospitals has played a lead role in federal reforms in at least five other states, where critics have raised similar concerns about cronyism and the quality of his work. Nirbhay Singh, a psychologist from Virginia, abruptly resigned from his California post last year after The Times asked state officials about rising violence in the hospitals and the state's hiring of Singh's family members. State mental health officials are now eliminating treatment approaches and elaborate paperwork that Singh imposed in a costly effort to satisfy a legal settlement between the state and the U.S. Department of Justice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2013 | By Anna Gorman
Aurora Las Encinas Hospital had evidence that a staff member had “inappropriate sexual contact” with a male patient and yet the facility failed to report the incident to county mental health officials, according to court documents. Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health investigators determined that the Pasadena psychiatric hospital did not provide “adequate medical or mental health treatment” to the patient, who had post-traumatic stress disorder and a history of sexual and physical abuse, the 2011 department report said.
BUSINESS
November 28, 2012 | By Chad Terhune, Los Angeles Times
A national report card on patient safety gave a failing grade to Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, one of the country's most prestigious hospitals and one of only 25 nationwide to receive such low marks. In a report issued Wednesday, the Leapfrog Group, an employer-backed nonprofit group focused on healthcare quality, gave a letter grade of F to UCLA Medical Center for performing poorly on several measures tied to preventing medical errors, patient infections and deaths. Leapfrog withheld a failing grade for UCLA in June when it released its first-ever hospital safety scores to give low-performing hospitals time to show improvement.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Chemed Corp., which owns plumbing and drain-cleaning service Roto-Rooter, agreed to sell its Patient Care Inc. unit to investors led by Schroder Ventures Life Sciences Group for $70 million in cash. Patient Care sells home health-care services mostly in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, Chemed said. The unit had $139.2million in sales last year. The sale of Patient Care will allow Chemed to concentrate on its maintenance and repair business, Chief Executive Kevin McNamara said.
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