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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
In a series of mistakes described as a "Swiss cheese" event by hospital officials, a patient recently admitted to Olive View- UCLA Medical Center was not assigned a doctor for two days. The patient was admitted to the Los Angeles County teaching hospital in Sylmar by an emergency room medical student, who filled out the admitting paperwork incorrectly despite help from an attending physician in the emergency room. Although a doctor's name was placed on the paperwork, the doctor was never called about the assignment, according to a memo by Dr. Mark Richman, who said he was the attending physician who helped the student with the paperwork.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
Federal and county authorities served a search warrant Thursday on the San Bernardino County-owned Arrowhead Regional Medical Center and seized documents at the 456-bed hospital in Colton. FBI agents and district attorney's investigators declined to say what they took from the facility or comment on the focus of the inquiry. The investigation was coordinated by the San Bernardino County Joint Corruption Task Force, according to a statement released by San Bernardino County Dist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2010 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
A bruising turf battle that pits City of Hope National Medical Center against the organization that provides most of its doctors has created a rift at the prestigious cancer treatment and research complex northeast of Los Angeles. The controversy — centering on a reorganization of hospital operations — has yielded dueling lawsuits, a doctors' "loss of confidence" vote against chief executive Dr. Michael A. Friedman and public pleas for support to lawmakers and patients.
NEWS
September 14, 2010
How would you feel if you had chest pains or a sinus infection that wouldn’t go away, and when you finally got in to see a doctor, she was coughing and sneezing throughout the entire examination? I, for one, would not particularly appreciate such dedication to patient care. But ironically, doctors have a tendency to show up to work when they should be taking sick days. There’s even a name for this – presenteeism . To find out how prevalent presenteeism is among doctors in residency training programs, a group of researchers sent surveys to 774 residents in internal medicine, general surgery, obstetrics/gynecology and pediatrics at 12 hospitals around the country.
NEWS
April 24, 2010 | Duke Helfand, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Tom Taylor learned a lesson about healthcare finances when he had both his knees replaced a couple of months apart at separate hospitals in Northern California. The tab at the first hospital was $95,000, but the second cost $55,000. The same doctor performed identical surgeries on both knees, and Taylor says he can't detect any differences between the two. "Nobody knows what it costs," said Taylor, 53, a former health insurance sales executive. "There is a complete lack of transparency in the healthcare system."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
California public health officials have imposed the first $100,000 fine under a new escalating system of penalties for hospitals that put patients at risk of death or serious injury. Southwest Healthcare System in Murrieta was assessed the fine after investigators determined that doctors at its Rancho Springs Medical Center performed caesarean sections on three women in October using electrical cauterizing instruments in a delivery room with dangerously low humidity, creating conditions that could have sparked a fire.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
State inspectors making a surprise follow-up visit to UC Irvine Medical Center last week found two deficiencies in "medication management" and issued an "immediate jeopardy" warning, alleging that patient care was at risk, hospital officials acknowledged Thursday. The warning, which was lifted Wednesday, is one of the most serious that can be issued to a hospital. UC Irvine Medical Center's chief executive, Terry A. Belmont, disclosed the findings by state inspectors working on behalf of the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in e-mails sent to the staff this week and last week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Rong-Gong Lin II
Los Angeles County will stop housing psychiatric patients at a mental unit it leases in Rosemead, citing "numerous patient life-safety deficiencies," and instead will add beds at the Martin Luther King Jr. Medical Campus in Willowbrook. The Board of Supervisors on Tuesday approved a $3.57-million expansion of the Augustus F. Hawkins Comprehensive Mental Health Center inpatient unit at King's Willowbrook campus, south of Watts. The renovations will add 26 beds to the 41-bed center, replacing the 24 beds at the county-run unit in Rosemead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2010 | By Larry Gordon
The University of California regents Thursday approved the controversial payment of $3.1 million in performance bonuses to 38 senior executives at UC's five medical centers. The regents emphasized that the payments were linked to improved patient health and stronger hospital finances and said they were important tools to attract and retain talent. They said the bonuses were part of a 16-year-old plan funded by hospital revenue, not state funds or student fees. An additional $33.7 million is distributed among 22,000 lower-ranking medical employees.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2009 | Tiffany Hsu
One of the state's largest employers, healthcare giant Kaiser Permanente, said it would eliminate more than 1,800 positions as it struggles with drooping membership, uncertain healthcare reform and shriveling Medicare reimbursement rates. Job reductions will occur within the next few months, the Oakland-based nonprofit said Tuesday. Many of the purged positions -- just under 2% of Kaiser employees -- are temporary, on-call or short-hour. Most Kaiser medical centers in California will be affected.
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