Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPatient Safety
IN THE NEWS

Patient Safety

BUSINESS
August 7, 2012 | By Chad Terhune
Hospital chain HCA Holdings Inc., under government scrutiny for allegedly performing unnecessary surgeries and other medical procedures on some Florida patients, has posted healthy profits at its three hospitals in Southern California. The Nashville, Tenn., company said in a securities filing Monday that officials with the U.S. attorney's office in Miami had requested information about medical necessity reviews for certain "cardiology services. " HCA said those reviews had occurred at about 10 of its hospitals, primarily in Florida.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2001
As a practicing physician, I appreciate your March 11 story, "Risk Was Known as FDA OKd Fatal Drug." When the diabetes drug Rezulin was still on the market, I was pushing for its withdrawal, or at least a "black box" warning to physicians. Since its inception in the early 1900s, the congressional mandate to the Food and Drug Administration has been to protect the public. In the 1990s, when Congress asked the FDA to speed approval for drugs that could potentially save lives in hopeless diseases such as AIDS and terminal cancer (fast-track approval)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2008 | Lee Romney, Times Staff Writer
When Lawrence Paul Rael was involuntarily committed to Atascadero State Hospital 10 years ago, his parents considered the placement appropriate. Born prematurely and with a severe hearing loss, Rael had been in and out of mental health facilities from the time he was a child, with a tentative diagnosis of autism. At 18, he molested two boys and was sent to prison and then to Atascadero.
HEALTH
October 11, 2010 | By Brendan Borrell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In the 18th century, physicians-in-training literally lived in the hospitals where they worked. Although today's "residents" are no longer supposed to be sleeping on the job, so to speak, their 30-hour work shifts mean that it's not uncommon to find them battling shut-eye in the emergency room. Heroic working hours have long been a badge of honor for senior physicians ? the late cardiovascular surgeon Michael DeBakey often bragged that he slept for only five or six hours per night tops.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
While Jesse Bravo was being treated for schizophrenia at White Memorial Medical Center last year, his wife, Laura, called the hospital daily and visited him several times. But when hospital officials decided to discharge him, Laura Bravo said, they didn't notify her and instead left him outside a rehabilitation center in South Los Angeles. She said her husband, who is not homeless, never went inside and spent days on the streets before being found. "Not knowing where he was was very scary," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2013 | By Anna Gorman
The union representing nearly 13,000 University of California patient-care workers plans to take a strike vote beginning Tuesday. The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, or AFSCME 3299, will hold the strike vote through Thursday and announce results next week. The vote comes after nearly a year of negotiations between the workers and UC over staffing, pay and pension reforms. The contract expired in September. Union President Kathryn Lybarger said the university is putting profits above patient safety and that workers want better staffing and fair pay. The hospitals have seen more understaffing and the use of temporary employees, she said.
HEALTH
November 30, 2009 | By Karen Ravn
When he arrived for his first visit, the 55-year-old diabetic had no idea what constituted a healthy diet, says pharmacist Steven Chen. "He ate two or three dinners a night, such as two whole pizzas about an hour apart." And he didn't know how to manage low blood sugar attacks. "He would eat an entire pie or cake instead of the recommended one serving of carbohydrate every 15 minutes." Not only did Chen advise his patient about good nutrition and exercise, he stressed the importance of taking his medications every day exactly as prescribed.
NEWS
September 21, 1997 | TARA MEYER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dr. Richard Borison and Bruce Diamond appeared to have it made at the Medical College of Georgia. The two had published widely and won dozens of research contracts from pharmaceutical companies to study drugs aimed at fighting Alzheimer's disease, anxiety, depression and schizophrenia. They also drove luxury cars and lived lavishly. Prosecutors say that's because they swindled more than $10 million from 1988 to 1996 and disregarded patient safety in their quest to get results.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2008 | Rong-Gong Lin II, Times Staff Writer
Thirteen hospitals, including five in Los Angeles and Orange counties, have been fined for placing patients at risk of serious injury or death, California health officials said Wednesday. Two Los Angeles County public hospitals, Harbor-UCLA and Olive View-UCLA medical centers, received citations. The two, along with County-USC Medical Center, form the backbone of the county's health system. Also fined were Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center, Garden Grove Hospital and Medical Center and St.
OPINION
March 20, 2013
Re "A make-or-break family ruling," March 18 If every politician would follow through on their oath to uphold the U.S. Constitution, the same-sex couple profiled in this article, whose marriage is recognized in Massachusetts but not by the federal government, would have no problem. Regardless of one's religious convictions, homosexuals are protected by the equal-protection provisions of the Constitution, period. Anyone with questions just has to read the document. You cannot deny benefits to someone because the Sunday school teacher doesn't like him. Those who disagree need to seek a constitutional amendment.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|