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HEALTH
March 1, 2014 | Jessica Q. Ogilvie
Chandra Wilson, who stars as Dr. Miranda Bailey on the ABC series "Grey's Anatomy," knows what it's like on the other side of the prescription pad. And she knows what it's like to advocate for an ill child. Her 20-year-old daughter has long struggled with mitochondrial disease, disorders caused by problems with the mitochondria, which generate energy for the cells. -- How did you first know that something was wrong? The first manifestations were cyclical vomiting syndrome.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
Mike Garson obviously takes the piano very seriously, but he can chuckle over some of the contradictory paths that a versatile mastery of the keys has led him down. Maybe the unlikeliest of all is the one he's embarking on Saturday at Segerstrom Concert Hall in Costa Mesa, where he'll lead 44 instrumentalists, augmented by a 55-voice children's choir, in the premiere of his "Symphonic Suite for Healing. " Even an accomplished musician like Garson, who's best known as a key sideman during David Bowie's 1970s rise to superstardom but who usually plays jazz or a jazz-classical fusion when left to his own devices, can laughingly confess that what he's doing isn't brain surgery or as important as finding a cure for cancer.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2014 | David Lazarus
The Generic Pharmaceutical Assn. says a proposed federal regulation that would allow makers of generic drugs to inform people about all known health risks would create "dangerous confusion" and have "harmful consequences for patients. " And why would that be? For the answer, the industry group pointed me toward a recent report from Matrix Global Advisors, an independent consulting firm. The report says the rule change would needlessly complicate the market and add $4 billion a year to already bloated healthcare costs.
OPINION
February 21, 2014
After a weeklong stay, the Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix sent me on my way on Jan. 5 with five stitches, a titanium alloy plate in my neck and a hard plastic Össur Miami J cervical collar that will remain on my neck until late March. A few weeks later, I learned what I'd been charged for the Miami J: $447. Had I been given the chance, I could have purchased the brace online for less than $100. Allowing that sort of comparison shopping is one small thing policymakers could do to slow the growth of healthcare spending.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Eryn Brown
Luis Rios, who lost his job at a filling station in December at the age of 56, is newly eligible for Medicaid, the healthcare program for the poor. Following the advice of state-trained medical insurance enrollment workers, he filled out the paperwork required to get coverage - but has a nagging fear that he may have put his family's financial assets at risk. That's because, in certain cases, Medi-Cal, California's version of Medicaid, will be able to collect repayment for healthcare services from the estate after a recipient dies, including placing government liens on property.
NATIONAL
February 16, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Companies that make generic drugs, the medications most Americans buy, are fighting to kill a proposed federal regulation that would require them for the first time to warn patients of all the known health risks of each drug they sell. The proposed rule change by the Food and Drug Administration "would be nothing short of catastrophic," said Ralph G. Neas, president of the Generic Pharmaceutical Assn., an industry trade group. It could raise healthcare costs and "create dangerous confusion" for doctors and patients, he said.
SPORTS
February 15, 2014 | By Ben Bolch
NEW ORLEANS - The reporter made her way through the throng of media surrounding Chris Paul inside a hotel ballroom, thrusting her microphone close to the Clippers star so that she could pick up the answer to the question she just had to know: Bojangles' or Popeyes? "Bojangles'," Paul said. "No question. Not even close. They've got Popeyes here in New Orleans. Their biscuits are good, but Bojangles' over Popeyes. " The reporter wasn't done with the hard-hitting inquiries.
NATIONAL
February 12, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Eighteen neurosurgery patients in North Carolina may have been exposed to an incurable brain disorder because instruments were not properly sterilized after an operation on someone who already had the disease.  Novant Health Forsyth Medical Center in Winston-Salem apologized this week, but said the risk was "very low. " In  a statement , the hospital said that "extra precautions should have been taken" because there were reasons to suspect that...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2014 | By Nita Lelyveld
You could try to do it with speeches. You could try to do it with laws. Or you could go grass-roots with glue sticks, markers and red hearts. How do you bring the people of a big city together? Big Sunday prefers the making-friends-while-making-valentines approach. The nonprofit, which aims to build community through service, is best known for one big weekend a year when thousands of volunteers fan out to hundreds of projects. But how to keep all those people feeling part of something bigger than themselves all year long?
OPINION
February 7, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
In an effort to cut costs, many insurers in the new state health insurance exchanges are offering plans with "narrow networks" that include fewer doctors and hospitals - particularly the costlier ones with famous names, such as Cedars-Sinai. The trade-off has sparked complaints from some policyholders who've had trouble seeing their favorite doctor or, in some cases, any doctor in the right specialty. Although regulators have to address those issues, narrow networks can actually be a good thing for patients if done the right way. Insurers started limiting their customers' choice of providers long before the Affordable Care Act passed in 2010, steering patients to preferred doctors and hospitals through restrictive HMOs or more inclusive - and popular - PPOs.
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