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Patriarch

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2013 | Robin Abcarian
The culture wars are back, and this time, the battle alarms sound like duck calls. The most recent episode of A&E's blockbuster show, “Duck Dynasty,” is a Christmas-themed show called “ O Little Town of West Monroe .”  Its contrived plot revolves around the idea that members of the Robertson family, who have a duck call business and look like ZZ Top impersonators, will star in their church's Nativity play. Over the course of the 30-minute show, the hairy, bandanna-wearing brothers fake-bicker about Christmas gifts for their hot blond wives.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2014 | Times staff and wire reports
Ralph Waite, an actor who played the patriarch of a Depression-era Virginia family on the classic television series "The Waltons," has died. He was 85. Waite, a Palm Desert resident, died Thursday, his manager, Alan Mills, told the Associated Press. The cause was not immediately determined, Mills said. Waite had been in good health and appeared last year in episodes of the series "NCIS," "Bones" and "Days of Our Lives. " "The Waltons," which aired on CBS from 1972 to 1981, starred Waite as John Walton; Richard Thomas played his oldest son, John-Boy, an aspiring novelist.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2012 | Marisa Gerber
When the delivery truck pulled up at the base of their steep driveway, the Beardsley children knew what to do. The crew, clad in hand-me-down clothes, poured out of their eight-bedroom Carmel home and down the hill. They helped unload 50-pound bags of flour and huge tubs of jam. Grocery shopping for 22 was pandemonium; instead, a restaurant supply company brought the food to them. "A jar of peanut butter? Gosh, that would last one meal. Maybe," said Susie Pope, a middle child in a big, blended family that inspired a Lucille Ball movie.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2013 | Robin Abcarian
The culture wars are back, and this time, the battle alarms sound like duck calls. The most recent episode of A&E's blockbuster show, “Duck Dynasty,” is a Christmas-themed show called “ O Little Town of West Monroe .”  Its contrived plot revolves around the idea that members of the Robertson family, who have a duck call business and look like ZZ Top impersonators, will star in their church's Nativity play. Over the course of the 30-minute show, the hairy, bandanna-wearing brothers fake-bicker about Christmas gifts for their hot blond wives.
NEWS
July 16, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
The Patriarch of the Greek Orthodox Church celebrated his first Sunday religious service in the United States before 1,200 worshipers who packed a Manhattan cathedral. Dimitrios I, 75, conducted the three-hour ceremony in the Byzantine-style Archdiocesan Cathedral of the Holy Trinity. Of 250 million Orthodox Christians worldwide, 6 million live in the United States.
NEWS
March 21, 1985 | Associated Press
Sir Michael Redgrave, the British film and stage actor and patriarch of the Redgrave acting dynasty, died today. He was 77 and had been suffering from Parkinson's disease for 12 years. Redgrave died at a nursing home in the county of Buckinghamshire west of London. His agent said his son, Corin, was at his bedside when he died.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2008
One Missed Call | People begin receiving cellphone calls that broadcast their final moments, and it's up to a traumatized woman (Shannyn Sossamon) and a police detective (Edward Burns) to solve the mystery before they get calls themselves. With Ana Claudia Talancon, Ray Wise and Margaret Cho. Screenplay by Andrew Klavan, based on a story by Miwako Daira and Yasushi Akimoto. PG-13 for intense sequences of violence and terror, frightening images, some sexual material and thematic elements.
NEWS
April 19, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
An aged patriarch nears his end as one of the wealthiest and most powerful men in the Caribbean. The two oldest of his four legitimate sons fight a bitter, multimillion-dollar power game, each maneuvering to seize control when the old man falters or dies. The patriarch's long-estranged wife and their two wealthy younger sons, one a playboy and the other a mystic, teasingly switch allegiance, first to one of the older brothers, then the other, as they decide which--if either--they will back in the dynasty game.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1989 | DON SHIRLEY
The first half of Eugene O'Neill's "The Rope" (Arts & Entertainment Cable Network, tonight at 6 and 10) is slow going, as a grim-faced rural woman (Elizabeth Ashley) tells us and her somewhat senile, Bible-quoting father (Jose Ferrer) about everything that happened in this family before the play began. Although director Lela Swift keeps Ashley moving around the barn where the conversation takes place, it's awkward exposition even by the standards of early O'Neill (this play dates from 1918).
NEWS
July 3, 1993 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fred Gwynne, a dour but lovable stage, film and television actor for four decades who was best remembered for his leading roles in the 1960s cult television series "The Munsters" and "Car 54 Where Are You?" died Friday. He was 66. Gwynne died in his home near Baltimore of pancreatic cancer, his New York legal representatives at Kraditor, Haber & Bienstock announced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2013 | Bloomberg News
William C. Cox Jr., the patriarch of the Bancroft clan that controlled Dow Jones & Co. for 105 years and sold it to Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. in a decision sparking a family feud, died Wednesday at his home in Hobe Sound, Fla., according to his daughter, Ann Bartram. He was 82. The cause was complications from diabetes. Cox was at the center of a protracted family dispute that ultimately led to the sale of New York-based Dow Jones, owner of the Wall Street Journal, to News Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
JOHNANNESBURG, South Africa - When Nigerian writer Chinua Achebe was in college, a European professor assigned "Mister Johnson," which portrayed Africa as a land of grinning, shrieking savages. Time magazine called it "the best novel ever written about Africa. " Achebe was outraged. He vowed that if someone as ignorant as Joyce Cary, the novel's Anglo-Irish author, could write such a book, "perhaps I ought to try my hand at it. " FOR THE RECORD: Chinua Achebe obituary: In the March 22 Section A, the obituary of Nigerian writer Chinua Achebe referred to writer Ngugi wa Thiongo as a fellow Nigerian.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2013 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
If your dad advises you not to go into the family business, it's perhaps understandable when the family business happens to be fighting fires or window-washing skyscrapers. But it might seem odd that Raul and Mexia Hernández's dad urged his sons not to become musicians. Music, after all, has been very good not only to their father, Hernán Hernández, but also to his brothers and cousins who make up the superstar Mexican norteño band Los Tigres del Norte. "One thing my dad always mentioned to us was the sacrifices you have to make, being away from your family, and kind of missing those things, the graduations, the soccer games," Mexia recalled recently.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2012 | Marisa Gerber
When the delivery truck pulled up at the base of their steep driveway, the Beardsley children knew what to do. The crew, clad in hand-me-down clothes, poured out of their eight-bedroom Carmel home and down the hill. They helped unload 50-pound bags of flour and huge tubs of jam. Grocery shopping for 22 was pandemonium; instead, a restaurant supply company brought the food to them. "A jar of peanut butter? Gosh, that would last one meal. Maybe," said Susie Pope, a middle child in a big, blended family that inspired a Lucille Ball movie.
WORLD
April 23, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW — Tens of thousands of people came to the square in front of a Moscow cathedral Sunday in a show of support for the Russian Orthodox Church, which is facing criticism for its close ties to the Kremlin and the wealth of its leaders. Under golden cupolas and a warm spring sun, church leaders dressed in red-and-gold robes carried crosses and icons around the mighty white walls of Christ the Savior Cathedral in a procession led by Patriarch Kirill. "What are we doing, my dears, here today, having gathered in such a multitude?"
WORLD
April 22, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
KARABANOVO, Russia - His unruly mane of white hair giving him the look of Moses, Father Georgy Edelstein struggled over the grayish snow that is the late-spring landscape of this barren village, heading to his church for Good Friday services. When he got to its small, darkened main hall, the 79-year-old put a simple silver cross over his robes and began saying prayers on one of the holiest days in the Russian Orthodox Church. His audience: his assistant and one villager. Two days later, the leader of the Russian Orthodox Church, Patriarch Kirill, exchanged hearty Easter kisses with President-elect Vladimir Putin amid the lavish interiors of Moscow's Christ the Savior Cathedral, his jewel-encrusted cross and gold brocade robe shining in the television limelight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
J. Paul Getty III, a scion of the Getty oil dynasty whose tragedies ? mutilation by kidnappers in the early 1970s and an incapacitating, drug-induced stroke in the 1980s ? brought into high relief the dysfunctional relations that beset his famously wealthy family, has died in Buckinghamshire, England. He was 54. Getty, who had homes in the Los Angeles area for some years after his ordeals, died Saturday after a long illness, according to a statement from his actor-son, Balthazar.
MAGAZINE
July 26, 1998
Thanks so much for "Patriarchs" (by Daniel Nussbaum, June 21). What a pleasure to be able to read real life stories shared by mature men who have experienced parts of our 20th century drama. Congratulations on presenting a positive collection of memories from positive men who have a profound and proper sense of their place in American history. Linda Lowry Paramount I loved the "Patriarchs" article. Beautifully done and beautifully photographed as well. Margaret Hurley hurley@ix.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
  Pope Shenouda III, the charismatic patriarch of the Coptic Orthodox Church whose shrewd grasp of religion and politics guided Egypt's Christians through deepening animosities with Muslims, died Saturday. He was 88. The state news agency reported that Shenouda, who led the church for four decades, had struggled with respiratory and liver ailments. There was no announcement about a successor. A stately figure with a flowing gray beard, the pope had attempted in recent months to buttressEgypt'sestimated 9 million Copts against persecution from Islamists following the revolution that overthrew former President Hosni Mubarak.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2011 | By Corina Knoll, Los Angeles Times
In the black before dawn, Adali Gutierrez has no trouble waking. He's used to rising before the alarm has a chance to buzz. It's Friday, which means he'll be supervising a crew sentenced to community cleanup. He doesn't mind the three-day weekend shift if it means $10 an hour - - better pay than at his other job emptying recycling bins. Photos:  Taking on a leading role Yasmin is up too, taking advantage of a rare empty bathroom. She's 17 and doesn't like to be hurried when straightening her hair before school.
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