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Patricia Green

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1992 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
Buffeted by a drop in ratings and harsh critical reaction from the news media, Patricia Green has resigned as co-executive producer of "L.A. Law." Steven Bochco, the show's co-creator, and former executive producer David Kelley, who left the show at the end of last season, will oversee scripts for the remaining eight episodes of the NBC drama's sixth year. Rick Wallace, who oversees production, will remain as co-executive producer. Although the legal series still ranks No.
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BUSINESS
September 15, 2009 | Ben Fritz
Hollywood may be in for tighter government scrutiny of its overseas operations. Producers Gerald and Patricia Green were found guilty late Friday on charges of bribery and money laundering related to their running of a local film festival in Thailand, a decision that experts say could lead to further investigation into the huge amounts of business film studios do overseas. The two were convicted of conspiracy to violate the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, eight counts of violating the act and seven counts of money laundering.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1992
I am Patricia Green's agent, and I thought your article on Steven Bochco returning as executive producer of "L.A. Law" ("Steven Bochco on the Case," April 2) was both excellent and accurate. However, I must clarify a perception that the opening paragraphs seemed to suggest. The story lines you listed--Arnie Becker's twisted testicle, a crooked judge, the rape trial of a baseball star who doesn't know the meaning of the word no and a case involving Nazi experiments on live human beings--were fully developed for the show while Green was the executive producer.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2009 | Associated Press
Before film producers Gerald and Patricia Green took over a movie festival in Bangkok, the weeklong event struggled to capture Hollywood's attention. Over the next four years, the Southern California couple transformed the festival into a rising star on the international circuit for screening new films, attracting the likes of Michael Douglas, Jeremy Irons and director Oliver Stone to Thailand. The success earned the couple a small fortune and drew scrutiny from federal prosecutors who have charged them with bribing Thai officials to run the festival and land lucrative contracts.
FOOD
January 2, 2002 | S. Irene Virbila
Winemaker Patricia Green made her reputation at Torii Mor winery in Oregon. In the spring of 2000, though, she and her cellar master, James Anderson, bought the old Autumn Wind Winery and re-christened it Patricia Green Cellars. Green has a wonderful feel for Pinot Noir and her first efforts under the new label are just now arriving on the market. This one, her basic Pinot Noir, is a bargain--an affordable Pinot with varietal character and depth that is drinking beautifully now.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2009 | Associated Press
Before film producers Gerald and Patricia Green took over a movie festival in Bangkok, the weeklong event struggled to capture Hollywood's attention. Over the next four years, the Southern California couple transformed the festival into a rising star on the international circuit for screening new films, attracting the likes of Michael Douglas, Jeremy Irons and director Oliver Stone to Thailand. The success earned the couple a small fortune and drew scrutiny from federal prosecutors who have charged them with bribing Thai officials to run the festival and land lucrative contracts.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2009 | Ben Fritz
Hollywood may be in for tighter government scrutiny of its overseas operations. Producers Gerald and Patricia Green were found guilty late Friday on charges of bribery and money laundering related to their running of a local film festival in Thailand, a decision that experts say could lead to further investigation into the huge amounts of business film studios do overseas. The two were convicted of conspiracy to violate the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, eight counts of violating the act and seven counts of money laundering.
OPINION
August 11, 1996
Your article on the television series "Christy" (Aug. 4) contained errors of fact and some important omissions. Ken Wales is not the creator of "Christy." Wales owned the rights to the novel, "Christy," which he and Barney Rosenzweig then sold to CBS-TV. The "created by" credit on the "Christy" pilot reads: "Based on the novel by Catherine Marshall. Developed for television by Patricia Green." I was co-executive producer of "Christy," both the pilot and the series. I adapted the novel for television and I wrote every word of the two-hour pilot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1990
Regarding "A Life is Lost in Tangle of Red Tape," (Feb. 4) by Lidia E. Everett, M.D. The tragic incident cited by Dr. Everett is not only a result of Medicare bureaucracy but of the efforts of those groups of activist senior citizens who successfully persuaded Congress to rescind the Catastrophic Health Act that was in place for one year, 1989. The Catastrophic Health Act allowed patients to be placed in a nursing home without a prior three-day stay in an acute hospital. Granted, the funding may not have been completely equitable.
HEALTH
September 7, 2009 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
They have the thinnest skin, the shortest fuses and take the hardest knocks. In psychiatrists' offices, they have long been viewed as among the most challenging patients to treat. They are the kind of people who drive a friend away for interfering and subsequently berate that friend for abandonment. But almost 20 years after the designation of borderline personality disorder as a recognized mental health condition, some understanding and hope have surfaced for people with the condition and their families.
FOOD
January 2, 2002 | S. Irene Virbila
Winemaker Patricia Green made her reputation at Torii Mor winery in Oregon. In the spring of 2000, though, she and her cellar master, James Anderson, bought the old Autumn Wind Winery and re-christened it Patricia Green Cellars. Green has a wonderful feel for Pinot Noir and her first efforts under the new label are just now arriving on the market. This one, her basic Pinot Noir, is a bargain--an affordable Pinot with varietal character and depth that is drinking beautifully now.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1992
I am Patricia Green's agent, and I thought your article on Steven Bochco returning as executive producer of "L.A. Law" ("Steven Bochco on the Case," April 2) was both excellent and accurate. However, I must clarify a perception that the opening paragraphs seemed to suggest. The story lines you listed--Arnie Becker's twisted testicle, a crooked judge, the rape trial of a baseball star who doesn't know the meaning of the word no and a case involving Nazi experiments on live human beings--were fully developed for the show while Green was the executive producer.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1992 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
Buffeted by a drop in ratings and harsh critical reaction from the news media, Patricia Green has resigned as co-executive producer of "L.A. Law." Steven Bochco, the show's co-creator, and former executive producer David Kelley, who left the show at the end of last season, will oversee scripts for the remaining eight episodes of the NBC drama's sixth year. Rick Wallace, who oversees production, will remain as co-executive producer. Although the legal series still ranks No.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1985
DRAMA, COMEDY SPECIAL "Do You Remember Love" LIMITED SERIES OUTSTANDING SERIES "The Jewel in the Crown" LEAD ACTRESS Joanne Woodward, "Do You Remember Love" LEAD ACTOR Richard Crenna, "The Rape of Richard Beck" SUPPORTING ACTRESS Kim Stanley, "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" SUPPORTING ACTOR Karl Malden, "Fatal Vision" DIRECTING Lamont Johnson, "Wallenberg: A Hero's Story" WRITING Vickie Patik, "Do You Remember Love" DRAMA OUTSTANDING
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1989
For the first time in its 15-year history, judges for the Humanitas Prize for humanizing achievement in television writing did not nominate any programs in the $25,000 category for TV movies, saying that none was worthy. "In the opinion of the judges, this was an excellent year in the half-hour and the hour categories. . . . But in our opinion it was a disappointing year in the long-form category," said Father Ellwood Kieser, president of the Human Family Institute. "We found a number of good movies of the week, but no great ones."
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