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Patricia Hearst

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2003 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Margaret Thaler Singer, one of the world's leading experts on cults and brainwashing who served as an expert witness in numerous high-profile court cases, including testifying for the defense in the 1976 bank robbery trial of kidnapped newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst, has died. She was 82. Singer, a clinical psychologist and former professor of psychology at UC Berkeley who also was known for her work on schizophrenia, died of pneumonia Sunday in a Berkeley hospital after a long illness.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2013
Bernard L. Shaw Bodyguard married Patricia Hearst Bernard L. Shaw, 68, a San Francisco police officer who served as Patty Hearst's bodyguard and later married her, died Tuesday in Garrison, N.Y. His death after a long illness was announced by the Hearst Corp., where he was employed as vice president for corporate security. Shaw was best known for his relationship with William Randolph Hearst's granddaughter. She made headlines in the 1970s for her kidnapping by the Symbionese Liberation Army, a paramilitary band of urban terrorists, and her later imprisonment for bank robbery.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2001 | DAVID GRITTEN, David Gritten is a London-based freelance writer and frequent contributor to Calendar
Talk about a snapshot in time. For people of a certain age, the primary image conjured up by the name Patty Hearst is a single frame of film shot on a surveillance camera. It shows her at age 19, brandishing a carbine, in the act of holding up a San Francisco bank. In this iconic picture, she looks the very embodiment of radical chic--rail-thin, with a beret atop her distinctly shaggy, shoulder-length hair.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2003 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Margaret Thaler Singer, one of the world's leading experts on cults and brainwashing who served as an expert witness in numerous high-profile court cases, including testifying for the defense in the 1976 bank robbery trial of kidnapped newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst, has died. She was 82. Singer, a clinical psychologist and former professor of psychology at UC Berkeley who also was known for her work on schizophrenia, died of pneumonia Sunday in a Berkeley hospital after a long illness.
NEWS
November 27, 1986
Charles Lessington Gould, publisher of the Hearst-owned San Francisco Examiner when Patricia Hearst was kidnaped and who became a leading opponent of her subsequent imprisonment, has died of cancer. He was 77. Gould, who died Sunday in a San Mateo hospital, came to the Examiner in 1961 as publisher, a post he held until 1975 when he joined the Hearst Foundation and the William Randolph Hearst Foundation. Gould served the Hearst Foundation until his death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2000 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Scott--the radical author and sports guru who in 1974 helped kidnapped heiress Patty Hearst and other Symbionese Liberation Army members elude one of the largest police searches in history--died Sunday of cancer in Eugene, Ore. He was 57. Scott's death came just two days after a Los Angeles Superior Court judge turned down a request by lawyers for SLA radical-turned- housewife Sara Jane Olson to videotape his testimony for her upcoming trial.
NEWS
January 1, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Catherine Campbell Hearst, a conservative member of the University of California Board of Regents for 20 years, including the riotous 1960s, has died at the age of 81. Hearst, who had moved to Beverly Hills after her divorce from Randolph A. Hearst, died Wednesday of a stroke at UCLA Medical Center. She became a nationally known figure after the Feb. 4, 1974, kidnapping of her daughter, Patricia Hearst, by the terrorist Symbionese Liberation Army.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1988 | John Voland, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The retired federal agent who headed the Patty Hearst investigation in the 1970s says that many of the events portrayed in the new Paul Schrader film "Patty Hearst" are inaccurate or misleading. The film--which describes the ordeal and seeming conversion of heiress Patricia Hearst to a violently radical philosophy after her 1974 kidnaping--"is an apology for Patty Hearst," according to former FBI agent Charles Bates, 68.
NEWS
May 12, 1988
John E. Hamilton; Indian Activist John E. Hamilton, 90, who called himself leader of the Mohegan-Pequot Indian Nation and conducted a marriage ceremony for kidnaped newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst. Hamilton, called Chief Rolling Cloud, was known for his involvement in lawsuits seeking the return of land to his southeastern Connecticut tribe. In the 1930s, Hamilton founded the American Indian Defense Assn. to protect Indian rights and remained its head for decades.
NEWS
January 19, 1989 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
With only days remaining in the Reagan Administration, the President and his aides indicated Wednesday it is unlikely he will pardon publishing heiress Patricia Hearst Shaw and industrialist Dr. Armand Hammer. Reagan, during a photography session, said the Shaw request for a pardon "hasn't come to my desk yet." And an Administration official who requested anonymity, said reporters should "not expect anything too extraordinary here in the form of pardons."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2002 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for a group of 1970s radicals accused of killing a suburban homemaker a quarter-century ago continued their push Friday to undercut the government's star witness--newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst Shaw. As a Nov. 12 preliminary hearing was set for the four former Symbionese Liberation Army members charged with the shotgun murder of Myrna Opsahl, 42, defense attorneys said the upcoming trial would hinge on Hearst's believability.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2002 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is no forgetting her name or the waxen face--beret on head, carbine in hand. Patty Hearst, the abducted newspaper heiress turned gun-toting terrorist, remains a dark emblem of a revolutionary era. Now she's being pulled back to that time and called upon to revisit its horrors. Hearst is the prosecution's presumptive star witness in a case against four old comrades in arms, members of a violent anti-establishment band who called themselves the Symbionese Liberation Army.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2002 | ANNA GORMAN and NANCY VOGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst on Tuesday called a 1975 bank robbery that left a mother of four dead "a violent, senseless, evil act" committed by bloodthirsty revolutionaries. Hearst said she has no qualms about testifying against former members of the radical Symbionese Liberation Army, which kidnapped her and with which she eventually participated in two bank robberies. "I don't have any skeletons in my closet," she said in an an appearance on CNN's "Larry King Live."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2001 | DAVID GRITTEN, David Gritten is a London-based freelance writer and frequent contributor to Calendar
Talk about a snapshot in time. For people of a certain age, the primary image conjured up by the name Patty Hearst is a single frame of film shot on a surveillance camera. It shows her at age 19, brandishing a carbine, in the act of holding up a San Francisco bank. In this iconic picture, she looks the very embodiment of radical chic--rail-thin, with a beret atop her distinctly shaggy, shoulder-length hair.
NEWS
January 21, 2001 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In his final hours as president, Bill Clinton on Saturday granted pardons to 140 Americans, including Patricia Hearst, an heiress kidnapped in the 1970s; his half-brother, Roger, who was convicted on drug charges; and Susan McDougal, who spent 18 months in jail rather than testify about the Clintons' role in the Whitewater scandal. Former Housing Secretary Henry G. Cisneros, ex-CIA Director John M. Deutch and former Arizona Gov. Fife Symington also received last-minute pardons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2000 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Freshly ungagged and ensconced among friends, Sara Jane Olson told supporters at a fund-raiser Saturday night that her upcoming Los Angeles trial will be a credibility contest between her and Patty Hearst Shaw. Olson criticized the newspaper heiress, who was kidnapped by the radical Symbionese Liberation Army in 1974, and the Los Angeles Police Department. She said Hearst's version of events has gone unchallenged for more than 30 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2002 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for a group of 1970s radicals accused of killing a suburban homemaker a quarter-century ago continued their push Friday to undercut the government's star witness--newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst Shaw. As a Nov. 12 preliminary hearing was set for the four former Symbionese Liberation Army members charged with the shotgun murder of Myrna Opsahl, 42, defense attorneys said the upcoming trial would hinge on Hearst's believability.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2000 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Enforcing the gag order in the Sara Jane Olson bomb plot case is proving to be problematic for Superior Court Judge James M. Ideman. Dist. Atty. Gil Garcetti and star prosecution witness Patricia Hearst Shaw recently have spoken out about the case. But at a hearing on Monday, Ideman directed his ire at an attorney who publicly filed a civil lawsuit on behalf of another prosecution witness, former LAPD Officer James Bryan, who was a target of the alleged bomb plot in 1975.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2000 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sara Jane Olson, who recently marched through the streets of Minneapolis with duct tape over her mouth to protest a Los Angeles judge's gag order, was freed on Friday to speak out about the 24-year-old bomb plot charges against her. But she seemed to be at loss for words.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2000
Patty Hearst Shaw has denied violating a Los Angeles Superior Court judge's gag order, saying she gave an interview in a national magazine to rebut "absurd allegations" that she staged her own kidnapping by the Symbionese Liberation Army in 1974. The letter to Judge James M. Ideman, written by Hearst's longtime attorney, George C. Martinez, states that she never was served with the order in the bomb-plot case of former SLA associate Sara Jane Olson.
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