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Patricia M Wald

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NEWS
December 9, 1992 | From Reuters
President-elect Bill Clinton plans to name the first woman attorney general and is considering four candidates, a newspaper reported in today's editions. Quoting transition aides, the New York Times said that the candidates are federal appeals Judge Patricia M. Wald, 64, of the District of Columbia Circuit; U.S. 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Amalya L. Kearse, 55, of New York; Judge Judith S. Kaye, 54, of the New York Court of Appeals, the state's highest court; and attorney Brooksley E.
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NEWS
December 9, 1992 | From Reuters
President-elect Bill Clinton plans to name the first woman attorney general and is considering four candidates, a newspaper reported in today's editions. Quoting transition aides, the New York Times said that the candidates are federal appeals Judge Patricia M. Wald, 64, of the District of Columbia Circuit; U.S. 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Amalya L. Kearse, 55, of New York; Judge Judith S. Kaye, 54, of the New York Court of Appeals, the state's highest court; and attorney Brooksley E.
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NEWS
November 20, 1990 | Associated Press
Judge Patricia M. Wald said Monday that she will step aside as chief judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit to allow Judge Abner J. Mikva to take the post. Wald, 62, said she plans to step down before Mikva's 65th birthday, Jan. 21. Under the law, a federal judge who is 65 or older cannot become a chief judge.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A federal appeals court ruled today that the government is acting properly in setting auto mileage standards without preparing formal environmental impact statements. The court, in a 2-1 decision, rejected a series of lawsuits by the state of California, the cities of Los Angeles and New York and several environmental and safety groups challenging the way the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration sets annual standards for the auto industry. Chief Judge Patricia M.
NATIONAL
February 13, 2004 | From Associated Press
President Bush on Thursday named the final two members of the commission that will investigate prewar intelligence on Iraq, adding the president of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a former Pentagon official. Charles M. Vest has been MIT's president since 1990. Henry S. Rowen, a professor emeritus at Stanford University, was an assistant defense secretary from 1989 to 1991 and a deputy assistant defense secretary from 1961 to 1964.
NEWS
October 23, 1993 | From Associated Press
The makeup of the Federal Election Commission was ruled unconstitutional Friday by a federal appeals court because the commission includes two non-voting members employed by Congress. But the three-judge panel of the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals suggested that the problem be remedied by amending the law creating the commission to eliminate the two members--the secretary of the Senate and the House clerk. Throwing out an FEC ruling against the National Rifle Assn.
NEWS
January 1, 1985
A federal appeals court Monday upheld the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's issuance of an operating license for the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant in California. In a 2-1 ruling, the court said that except for "two minor exceptions," it could not fault the commission's decision in August to allow the first unit of the problem-plagued twin reactor plant to begin commercial operation. "The Diablo Canyon proceedings have lasted 15 years, involved scores of decisions . . .
NEWS
June 18, 1997 | From The Washington Post
A federal appeals court Tuesday expanded the scope of privileges for presidential communications to include those of senior advisors. The decision could affect the Clinton administration's legal battle with the Whitewater independent counsel over a White House lawyer's notes of conversations with First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton. The three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C.
NEWS
August 23, 1985 | Associated Press
A federal appeals court today struck down the Federal Communications Commission's policy of giving a special preference to women seeking to own FM radio stations. By a 2-1 vote in a case from Georgia, a U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals panel ruled that the preferential policy used by the commission since 1978 exceeds the FCC's legal authority. "A mandate to serve the public interest is not a license to conduct experiments in social engineering conceived seemingly by whim," Judge Edward A.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1989 | From Associated Press
A federal appeals court has ruled as unconstitutional federal rules that give minorities preference in the purchase of "distressed" radio and television stations. A panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, in a 2-1 vote Friday, said the Federal Communications Commission's "distress sale" rules, which allow quick sales at reduced rates of defunct or disenfranchised stations to minorities, violate the equal protection provisions of the Fifth Amendment to the Constitution.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1989 | From Associated Press
A federal appeals court on Friday cleared the way for restoration of rules designed to prevent cable TV systems from showing syndicated programs that local TV stations also might be showing. The unanimous ruling by a three-judge panel of the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia could mean that TV viewers will get fewer chances to view some of their favorite syndicated shows starting Jan. 1.
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