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Patrick Hooty Croy

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MAGAZINE
June 24, 1990 | DAVID TALBOT and David Talbot is a San Francisco writer and editor.
THIS IS THE prosecution's story: Shortly before midnight on July 16, 1978, a band of young Indians, riding high from a weekend of weed, whiskey and late nights, looted the Sports and Spirits liquor store in Yreka, Calif., a lumber town near the Oregon border, jumped in their getaway car and sped north, chased by the screaming sirens of the Yreka police department.
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MAGAZINE
June 24, 1990 | DAVID TALBOT and David Talbot is a San Francisco writer and editor.
THIS IS THE prosecution's story: Shortly before midnight on July 16, 1978, a band of young Indians, riding high from a weekend of weed, whiskey and late nights, looted the Sports and Spirits liquor store in Yreka, Calif., a lumber town near the Oregon border, jumped in their getaway car and sped north, chased by the screaming sirens of the Yreka police department.
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NEWS
May 3, 1989 | ROBERT CHOW, Times Staff Writer
Adorned with African masks, preserved rattlesnake hides, totem poles, gargoyles and wood-carved monkeys--not a framed certificate in sight--the law office of J. Tony Serra looks more like an occult curio shop. Likewise, the man himself--with his gold-capped front tooth, steel-gray hair flowing past his shoulders and super-wide tie from a previous decade--has a distinctly unlawyerly presence, which is just fine with him. "I don't chum with lawyers. Most lawyers I don't respect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2000 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Francisco's virtuoso anti-establishment lawyer, J. Tony Serra--the mesmerizing defender of freaks, drug dealers, Black Panthers, Hells Angels and, yes, even a fire-eater--will stride into Los Angeles Superior Court today on behalf of a wholesome-looking Minnesota housewife accused of plotting years ago to blow up police cars in Los Angeles. Serra will make quite an impression.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2005 | Lee Romney, Times Staff Writer
He could have been sitting at his own funeral. J. Tony Serra -- the ponytailed, pot-smoking criminal defense attorney famous for fighting the government and celebrated in the 1989 film "True Believer" -- listened as a gallery of some of the Bay Area's most respected lawyers honored him. He was praised as a humanist who practiced law out of love and saved the government "millions of dollars" with back-to-back pro bono cases, funded from his threadbare pocket.
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