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Patrick Reynolds

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1994
I'm shocked that Patrick Reynolds (Opinion, June 5) could stain his bands with money he received from the sale of his R.J. Reynolds stock. Doesn't he know that 500,000 of us smokers die each year of smoking-related illnesses after we were duped by his father and grandfather. Or did I miss something in the article that said he donated something other than his mouth to causes to help eliminate young people from starting smoking. Reynolds would tax cigarettes to cover the $22-billion smoking-related medical costs each year.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2006 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
Nice catch by his brother, Patrick Reynolds admits. Forty-two years after his boyhood baseball glove disappeared, his brother discovered it hidden in a barrel of used sports equipment at a Torrance flea market. Reynolds' name, printed with a felt-tipped laundry marker on the left-hander's mitt, was still legible. So was his family's pre-area code phone number: "FRontier 18709."
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BOOKS
August 27, 1989 | SONJA BOLLE
A history of the R. J. Reynolds tobacco clan, "The Gilded Leaf" chronicles the family enterprise that began with the Prince Albert products and Camel cigarettes and became RJR Nabisco. Born in 1850, R. J. Reynolds was a Southern tycoon when tobacco was king. His brother Abram established the Reynolds metal empire. At his death at age 68, R. J. left an enormous inheritance to his children, the oldest of whom was only 12.
NEWS
August 10, 1994 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Patrick Reynolds, tobacco heir, easily explains himself: "I fight the tobacco industry. That is who I am, and what I do." At a Town Hall lecture last Thursday night, Reynolds, 45, proves he has few peers in his chosen role of biting the hand that used to feed him. Casually, as if among friends, Reynolds straightens the jacket of his pearl gray suit, stands before 100 members of the prestigious current affairs group, and quietly starts to reminisce: "My parents divorced when I was 3.
NEWS
August 10, 1994 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Patrick Reynolds, tobacco heir, easily explains himself: "I fight the tobacco industry. That is who I am, and what I do." At a Town Hall lecture last Thursday night, Reynolds, 45, proves he has few peers in his chosen role of biting the hand that used to feed him. Casually, as if among friends, Reynolds straightens the jacket of his pearl gray suit, stands before 100 members of the prestigious current affairs group, and quietly starts to reminisce: "My parents divorced when I was 3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1994 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was an unusual moment: Anti-cigarette advocates gathered to eulogize an heir to the giant R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. * That was the scene Thursday in Santa Monica as no-smoking crusader Patrick Reynolds conducted a memorial service for his half-brother, R.J. Reynolds III. R.J. Reynolds, a 60-year-old grandson and namesake of the cigarette company founder, died June 28 of smoking-related emphysema. "We agreed to disagree about tobacco issues," said Patrick Reynolds, 45, of Beverly Hills.
NEWS
January 24, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
John Dillard Reynolds, grandson of former tobacco industry executive R. J. Reynolds, leaped to his death from a hotel's 11th-floor balcony outside Orlando, Fla., on Monday. He was 54. Spokesmen for the Orange County Sheriff's Department said witnesses saw Reynolds climb the balcony and prepare to jump.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2006 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
Nice catch by his brother, Patrick Reynolds admits. Forty-two years after his boyhood baseball glove disappeared, his brother discovered it hidden in a barrel of used sports equipment at a Torrance flea market. Reynolds' name, printed with a felt-tipped laundry marker on the left-hander's mitt, was still legible. So was his family's pre-area code phone number: "FRontier 18709."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1994
In response to Richard P. Corpis' letter (June 15) accusing me of not donating my personal funds to help fight tobacco use, the fact is that I have personally given over $1.5 million of my $2.5 million inheritance to the fight for that cause. I make no apology for using the remaining balance to support and fuel my campaign for a smoke-free America. I divested all my tobacco stock in 1979. As to the cigarette tax, the reason it's appropriate to single out tobacco is that cigarettes are the only products which, when used as intended, cause disease and death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1989 | MARCIDA DODSON, Times Staff Writer
Tobacco has made his family flourish, but these days the grandson of R.J. Reynolds sees no good in cigarettes. A descendant of the biggest name in the industry who lost his father to emphysema brought on by smoking, he has spent the last 3 years speaking out against the industry, encouraging people to stop puffing, and fighting for restrictions on cigarette advertising and sales.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1994 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was an unusual moment: Anti-cigarette advocates gathered to eulogize an heir to the giant R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. * That was the scene Thursday in Santa Monica as no-smoking crusader Patrick Reynolds conducted a memorial service for his half-brother, R.J. Reynolds III. R.J. Reynolds, a 60-year-old grandson and namesake of the cigarette company founder, died June 28 of smoking-related emphysema. "We agreed to disagree about tobacco issues," said Patrick Reynolds, 45, of Beverly Hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1994
In response to Richard P. Corpis' letter (June 15) accusing me of not donating my personal funds to help fight tobacco use, the fact is that I have personally given over $1.5 million of my $2.5 million inheritance to the fight for that cause. I make no apology for using the remaining balance to support and fuel my campaign for a smoke-free America. I divested all my tobacco stock in 1979. As to the cigarette tax, the reason it's appropriate to single out tobacco is that cigarettes are the only products which, when used as intended, cause disease and death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1994
I'm shocked that Patrick Reynolds (Opinion, June 5) could stain his bands with money he received from the sale of his R.J. Reynolds stock. Doesn't he know that 500,000 of us smokers die each year of smoking-related illnesses after we were duped by his father and grandfather. Or did I miss something in the article that said he donated something other than his mouth to causes to help eliminate young people from starting smoking. Reynolds would tax cigarettes to cover the $22-billion smoking-related medical costs each year.
OPINION
June 5, 1994 | Steve Proffitt, Steve Proffitt is a producer for Fox News and contributor to National Public Radio's "Morning Edition" and "All Things Considered." He interviewed Patrick Reynolds at his home in Beverly Hills
The ashtray may soon be a collector's item. The nation's 50 million smokers are feeling like an oppressed minority. Tobacco-control advocates have snuffed out cigarettes in airplanes, theaters, ball parks and shopping malls. Many cities prohibit smoking in restaurants and other public places.
NEWS
February 29, 1992 | R. DANIEL FOSTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Patrick Reynolds may never eat lunch in this town again. Reynolds, a customer in some of Los Angeles' finest eateries, has gone up against those restaurants in his crusade against public smoking. As the grandson of R. J. Reynolds--a man who persuaded millions to walk a mile for a Camel--Reynolds is an unlikely but formidable nicotine nemesis. He is among the supporters of Councilman Marvin Braude's proposed ban on smoking in Los Angeles restaurants.
NEWS
January 24, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
John Dillard Reynolds, grandson of former tobacco industry executive R. J. Reynolds, leaped to his death from a hotel's 11th-floor balcony outside Orlando, Fla., on Monday. He was 54. Spokesmen for the Orange County Sheriff's Department said witnesses saw Reynolds climb the balcony and prepare to jump.
MAGAZINE
May 21, 1989 | PATRICK REYNOLDS and TOM SHACHTMAN
'Patrick was depressed when he returned to Hollywood. In a journal, he poured out what he knew of his father. He tried to stop loathing Dick and struggled to understand him.' From "The Gilded Leaf--Triumph, Tragedy, and Tobacco: Three Generations of the R.J. Reynolds Family and Fortune," to be published this month by Little, Brown and Co. This excerpt describes the period before tobacco heir Patrick Reynolds, grandson of R.J. Reynolds, became...
NEWS
February 29, 1992 | R. DANIEL FOSTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Patrick Reynolds may never eat lunch in this town again. Reynolds, a customer in some of Los Angeles' finest eateries, has gone up against those restaurants in his crusade against public smoking. As the grandson of R. J. Reynolds--a man who persuaded millions to walk a mile for a Camel--Reynolds is an unlikely but formidable nicotine nemesis. He is among the supporters of Councilman Marvin Braude's proposed ban on smoking in Los Angeles restaurants.
BOOKS
August 27, 1989 | SONJA BOLLE
A history of the R. J. Reynolds tobacco clan, "The Gilded Leaf" chronicles the family enterprise that began with the Prince Albert products and Camel cigarettes and became RJR Nabisco. Born in 1850, R. J. Reynolds was a Southern tycoon when tobacco was king. His brother Abram established the Reynolds metal empire. At his death at age 68, R. J. left an enormous inheritance to his children, the oldest of whom was only 12.
MAGAZINE
May 21, 1989 | PATRICK REYNOLDS and TOM SHACHTMAN
'Patrick was depressed when he returned to Hollywood. In a journal, he poured out what he knew of his father. He tried to stop loathing Dick and struggled to understand him.' From "The Gilded Leaf--Triumph, Tragedy, and Tobacco: Three Generations of the R.J. Reynolds Family and Fortune," to be published this month by Little, Brown and Co. This excerpt describes the period before tobacco heir Patrick Reynolds, grandson of R.J. Reynolds, became...
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