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Patriot Missile

NEWS
January 24, 1991 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Off in the distance, the great boxes were tilted at an angle, as if balancing precariously on the hard-packed land of the desert. These were the Patriot missile batteries that have been the defenders of Riyadh, the capital of Saudi Arabia, as well as Dhahran in the Eastern Province, since the shooting war with Iraq began.
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NEWS
January 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Greek Foreign Minister Antonis Samaras flew to the United States to seek more U.S. military aid, specifically Patriot anti-missile missiles to defend against possible Iraqi attack. Officials said Samaras is to meet with Secretary of State James A. Baker III and Defense Secretary Dick Cheney in Washington today. The Greek minister flew to New York after returning to Athens from visits to Cairo and Damascus.
NEWS
January 18, 1991 | From United Press International
An American Patriot missile made a point today. The Patriot intercepted an Iraqi Scud early in the morning moments before the enemy projectile would have reached U.S.-led troops at Dhahran International Air Field. "I'm glad it worked," a relieved Navy Lt. Cmdr. Ron Morse said of the widely criticized Patriot. "Some congressman have complained that it isn't any good, that the Navy doesn't know how to use it," Morse scoffed. "Well, I guess we showed them."
NEWS
January 21, 1991 | From Reuters
Israel spurned a U.S. offer of Patriot missiles and U.S. crews to operate them just days before Iraq sent Scud missiles crashing into Israeli cities, military sources said today. Israel already had two Patriot missile batteries under an agreement with Washington in September, but Israeli crews were not fully trained to use the weapon. Iraq fired at least 11 Scuds at Israel Friday and Saturday, slightly wounding 28 people. U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1992
Rumors and allegations that Israel illegally transferred U.S. weapons technology to third countries have not been laid to rest, despite strong denials from Jerusalem. A statement last week from the Israeli Embassy in Washington, noting that reports of unauthorized sales "are sensitive matters which are subject to negotiations" between the two governments, may in fact have unintentionally undercut some of the denials.
NEWS
January 26, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is considering sending Patriot anti-missile batteries to South Korea to strengthen U.S. forces there and help discourage any possible attacks by North Korea, officials here said Tuesday. The move, which still requires a final decision by the President, was requested two weeks ago by Gen. Gary Luck, commander of U.S. forces in Korea, in the face of a continuing buildup of North Korean troops along the border.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1994 | From Times Wire Services
Raytheon Co., maker of the Patriot missile, is shutting down plants and shedding about 4,400 employees because of the massive cuts in U.S. defense spending, the company said Wednesday. The restructuring will result in a first-quarter, after-tax charge of $162 million, the defense contractor said. About 65% of the charge, which amounts to $1.20 a share, is related to the company's defense business, it said.
NEWS
June 21, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taiwan test-fired three American-made Patriot air defense missiles Wednesday in a move likely to increase tensions with mainland China, less than 100 miles across the Taiwan Strait. After the launch of an initial Patriot PAC-2 missile to check the weapon's operating systems early Wednesday, two others were fired at dummy targets--one a drone aircraft, the other a small, domestically produced missile, according to Taiwanese military sources.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1991 | MICHAEL CONNELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The former owner of a Burbank firm that made components for the Patriot missile system was sentenced to two years in prison Monday for fraudulently overbilling the government $540,000 for the parts. Michael Martin Zarachoff, 45, of Northridge was also ordered by U.S. District Court Judge Ronald S. W. Lew to serve five years' probation and pay back taxes, interest and penalty on the money that the government overpaid his firm.
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