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Patti Davis

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OPINION
February 20, 1994
Even though their daughter, Patti, has made a lifelong career of bashing her parents, President and Mrs. Reagan have refrained from any public rebuttal of her outrageous claims. President and Mrs. Reagan have tried continuously to resolve Patti's problems privately as a family matter, yet every effort to reach out to her has been rejected. I cannot understand why The Times gives such high visibility to the outrageous charges of such a deeply disturbed woman (Feb. 15). I see little news value in covering a subculture educational program she conducted which could only draw 25 attendees.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2013 | By Los Angeles Times Staff
Would Ronald Reagan have supported gay marriage? His daughter, Patti Davis, thinks so. She told the New York Times in an interview that, growing up in California her family had close relationships with and accepted gay couples. “I grew up in this era where your parents' friends were all called aunt and uncle,” Davis told the paper. “And then I had an aunt and an aunt. We saw them on holidays and other times.” She added, “We never talked about it, but I just understood that they were a couple.” According to the New York Times: Davis "offered several reasons her father, who would have been 102 this year, would have bucked his party on the issue: his distaste for government intrusion into private lives, his Hollywood acting career and close friendship with a lesbian couple who once cared for Ms. Davis and her younger brother Ron while their parents were on a Hawaiian vacation - and slept in the Reagans' king-size bed. " She also said that when Reagan once saw Rock Hudson kill a woman on screen, he told her the closeted gay star “would rather be kissing a man.” Davis' comments come as the U.S. Supreme Court is deciding the fate of Proposition 8, California's ban on gay marriage.
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HEALTH
February 6, 2012 | By Patti Davis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In 1994, when my father disclosed that he had Alzheimer's disease, I was living in New York. The news that Ronald Reagan had willingly told the world about his condition was everywhere, and with the familiarity typical of New Yorkers, people would stop me on the street to express condolences or share their own experiences with the disease. It was the latter scenario that transfixed me. Complete strangers would tell me about their mother or their father, a grandparent or aunt. They would give me a few details, their eyes would brim with emotion, and then they'd be gone.
HEALTH
February 6, 2012 | By Patti Davis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In 1994, when my father disclosed that he had Alzheimer's disease, I was living in New York. The news that Ronald Reagan had willingly told the world about his condition was everywhere, and with the familiarity typical of New Yorkers, people would stop me on the street to express condolences or share their own experiences with the disease. It was the latter scenario that transfixed me. Complete strangers would tell me about their mother or their father, a grandparent or aunt. They would give me a few details, their eyes would brim with emotion, and then they'd be gone.
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | From Times wire services
Patti Davis, Ronald and Nancy Reagan's estranged daughter, is now estranged from her husband, it was reported today. Davis, 37, has been living apart from yoga instructor Paul Grilley, whom she married Aug. 14, 1984, for about a month, the New York Daily News said. "They are divorcing," a friend of Davis told the newspaper.
MAGAZINE
March 9, 2003
Patti Davis' "musing" was a hoot ("My Own Muse," Style, Feb. 16). Like e-mail spelling, real style is knowing all the rules and then breaking them on purpose. Over the years Davis has proven that if you don't take yourself too seriously, no one else will either. Being able to go her own way and laff at herself proves that she has style to squander. And that should be good enuff to satisfy any of her critics! Carol Nahin Palm Desert
MAGAZINE
January 13, 2002
Thank you to Patti Davis for her eloquent and touching reflections on the occasion of her 49th birthday ("A Birthday Wish," Dec. 9). It was a truly enriching experience to read something that resonated so deeply. Marcia Goodman Long Beach How nice to learn that self-involved baby boomers such as Patti Davis think they have finally grown up at 50. Their parents grew up at 20, fought a war, developed a country, and some of them evidently spoiled a generation that is able to walk along a beach, study their navels and grope through life.
NEWS
May 15, 1992
Re "The Way Patti Sees It" (April 30): Patti (Reagan) Davis ought to grow up and open her eyes. Only then would she be able to recognize that all children, no matter how good or how bad their families were, must somehow overcome their childhood and forgive their parents. What Patti Davis fails to recognize is that her struggle for self is a struggle we all must make. She has disregarded discovering who she is and is constantly reminding us how she is inexplicably riding on her famous parents' coattails and is quite content to stay there.
BOOKS
March 30, 1986 | Jean Vallely, Vallely is West Coast editor of Gentleman's Quarterly. and
The very least one should expect from a book by the daughter of the former governor of California and current President of the United States--a novel about being the daughter of a former governor of California and current President of the United States--is a sense of what it's really like. But there is so little information in Patti Davis' novel, "Home Front" (written with Maureen Strange Foster), that I could have written this book, and my father is in the construction business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1994 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The seminar is entitled "Recovering From Dysfunctional Families," the cost is $39 and the teacher is Patti Davis, daughter of Ronald and Nancy Reagan. Yes, her mother beat her, Davis tells the 25 people gathered at a Culver City hotel. Her father refused to acknowledge it. Her mother popped a galaxy of pills. Her father abandoned her emotionally. In the past, Davis says, she bemoaned her fate as yet another casualty of a dysfunctional family.
MAGAZINE
March 9, 2003
Patti Davis' "musing" was a hoot ("My Own Muse," Style, Feb. 16). Like e-mail spelling, real style is knowing all the rules and then breaking them on purpose. Over the years Davis has proven that if you don't take yourself too seriously, no one else will either. Being able to go her own way and laff at herself proves that she has style to squander. And that should be good enuff to satisfy any of her critics! Carol Nahin Palm Desert
MAGAZINE
January 13, 2002
Thank you to Patti Davis for her eloquent and touching reflections on the occasion of her 49th birthday ("A Birthday Wish," Dec. 9). It was a truly enriching experience to read something that resonated so deeply. Marcia Goodman Long Beach How nice to learn that self-involved baby boomers such as Patti Davis think they have finally grown up at 50. Their parents grew up at 20, fought a war, developed a country, and some of them evidently spoiled a generation that is able to walk along a beach, study their navels and grope through life.
NEWS
June 7, 2001
I read with amusement Patti Davis' diatribe against "tell all" male politicians ("Ah, the Good Ol' Days of Repression," May 29). She decries the new openness on the part of male politicians regarding their medical conditions and private lives, using Rudy Giuliani and Bob Dole as examples of particularly egregious lapses in public taste. Giuliani's sin was talking about the effects of chemotherapy for his prostate cancer, and Dole's was admitting to erectile dysfunction. Men in public life are now merely acting the way women have for decades in this country.
NEWS
April 30, 2001
Undoubtedly, many people identified homeless people they have seen time and again and the changes that occur. Patti Davis' article ("Looking Deep Into the Haunted Eyes of the Homeless," April 11) highlighted the situation very well. Over the past 12 years, we have seen a homeless man [in our area] go from being a fairly clean-cut person to one who has deteriorated so badly it makes us want to cry. St. Joseph Center in Venice sponsors a cafe called Bread & Roses, and there are cards that one can give to homeless people directing them to the cafe and other services that the center offers.
NEWS
March 26, 2001
Regarding "Battle Takes Shape in the Toniest of War Grounds" (March 18): We are very concerned that The Times chose to print an article by Patti Davis, who had a serious conflict of interest. Ms. Davis' mother is apparently part of a small group of neighbors opposing our new home project. The article makes it appear as if the entire Bel-Air community is against this project. Nothing could be further from the truth. The Bel-Air Assn., certainly the toughest homeowners' association, approved our project in January 2000.
OPINION
March 4, 2001
Re "36 Steps for Those Without the Wisdom to Know the Difference," by Patti Davis, Commentary, Feb. 28: Dear Patti: You may continue to shoot yourself in the foot if you must, but please don't shoot others. The desire to atone for one's mistakes should never come at the expense of another. Instead, I would like to suggest to you that you address George, who seems to want to emulate both Ronald's personality and policies. I can assure you that while Ronald's personality was charming, his policies hurt my family much more than Bill and Hillary's imperfections.
NEWS
September 22, 1989 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, Times Staff Writer
Patti (Reagan) Davis is at it again. A month before publication of her mother's memoirs, Davis' second novel, "Deadfall," hits bookstores next week. And like her first, it will probably raise some hackles back home on the Reagan ranch. A kind of political "Daddy Dearest," the spy thriller takes aim at the war in Nicaragua, which she described in an interview this week as "my father's war."
BOOKS
October 8, 1989 | Richard Boudreaux, Boudreaux is The Times' bureau chief in Managua, Nicaragua. and
At the turning point of "Deadfall," Patti Davis' novel about political conspiracy and personal tragedy, Andrew Laverty succumbs to an aimless rage that leads him to his death. Laverty, a documentary film maker disinherited for his anti-war views, becomes the victim of a CIA-backed plot he is trying to expose. It is 1989 in Nicaragua, and the conspirators are working to escalate the fading Contra war into direct U.S. involvement.
NEWS
October 26, 2000
I read Patti Davis' article ("Abortion: The Tragic, Forgotten Reality," Oct. 13) with great sadness. The stories she related were heart-wrenching indeed, yet those affected most by those hard decisions she illustrated were barely mentioned: the unborn children--they are the tragic, forgotten reality in abortion. Two years ago, my brother and his wife adopted a child who is such an integral, delightful, joyful part of our family. How grateful we all are to the birth mother and father who were selfless enough to bless the lives of our family with the child they were not ready to raise.
NEWS
October 17, 2000
I would like Patti Davis to know how very much I appreciated her words about not being able to actually speak to her dear father but knowing pretty much what he'd say ("When Kindness Becomes a Dilemma," Sept. 25). My own beloved dad died this past spring, a man to whom my daughters and I turned constantly for advise and counsel. I find constant solace in the fact that I can still talk to my dad--he just can't answer out loud any more. But we do find his answers in our memories of his wise and wonderful ways.
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