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Patty Duke

ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1987
Patty Duke, president of the Screen Actors Guild, will be honored by the Interguild Women's Caucus during its program "Women in Transition: On and Behind the Screen" on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Directors Guild of America, 7950 Sunset Blvd.
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NEWS
November 11, 1990 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What baby boomers could ever forget that memorable theme song to The Patty DukeShow?: "Meet Cathy who's lived most everywhere, from Zanzibar to BerkeleySquare, but Patty's only seen the sights a girl can see from Brooklyn Heights,what a crazy pair. . ." But they're cousinsI" Now seen in reruns on Nickelodeon, the 1963-66 ABC comedy featured then16-year-old Patty Duke, fresh from her Oscar-winning role as Helen Keller in"The Miracle Worker."
NEWS
November 3, 1991 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William Schallert describes himself as "the most promiscuous parent in the history of television." Well, maybe not the most promiscuous, but over the past three decades Schallert has played the kind, loving and understanding father on "The Nancy Drew Mysteries," "Little Women," "The New Gidget" and the role for which he's most known, "The Patty Duke Show." Now he's playing a grandfather in the NBC comedy "The Torkelsons."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1990 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
It's tempting to dismiss "Call Me Anna" as just another triumph-over-affliction movie: child star is victimized by cruel managers, cracks up mentally as an adult, later rebuilds life and serves as positive example. Blah blah blah. What elevates this turbulent ABC drama about actress Patty Duke above the crowd, however, are its wrenching depictions of that tragically bizarre childhood and her mental illness that seemed to surface only later. Airing at 9 p.m.
MAGAZINE
June 14, 1992
For Ruben Martinez, there was "The Brady Bunch" ("East Side, West Side," May 3). For me, a Latina (Mexican-American, then), there was "The Patty Duke Show." Patty was my heroine. She exemplified a young, powerful teen-ager in charge of her life and destiny. She was smart, popular and white. There was never any doubt (or episodes that I can recall) that questioned whether Patty would graduate from high school or would apply for college admission. As I remember, she was encouraged by her parents to think about college.
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