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Paul Bowles

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November 13, 2011 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times
Travels Collected Writings, 1950-1993 Paul Bowles Ecco: 512 pp., $16.99 paper Hear the words "Paul Bowles" and you probably picture an unsmiling man hunkered down in a tiled Moroccan hall, possibly with a pipe in his mouth, deep in desert reverie, about to publish his first novel, "The Sheltering Sky. " This is a reasonable image to hold. Bowles dearly loved his North African desert and his cannabis, as bits of "Travels: Collected Writings, 1950-1993" make clear.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2011 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times
Travels Collected Writings, 1950-1993 Paul Bowles Ecco: 512 pp., $16.99 paper Hear the words "Paul Bowles" and you probably picture an unsmiling man hunkered down in a tiled Moroccan hall, possibly with a pipe in his mouth, deep in desert reverie, about to publish his first novel, "The Sheltering Sky. " This is a reasonable image to hold. Bowles dearly loved his North African desert and his cannabis, as bits of "Travels: Collected Writings, 1950-1993" make clear.
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NEWS
November 19, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In exotic post-World War II Tangier, the composer, translator, poet and writer Paul Bowles presided over a dazzling salon of expatriate American Beat writers whose counter-mainstream literature, often an acquired taste, won admiration.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2008
Book prize: Author Amy Hempel, whose candid takes on modern life have brought her a small but devoted following, has been named this year's winner of the Rea Award for the Short Story, a $30,000 prize that in previous years has been given to Paul Bowles, Eudora Welty and Grace Paley. The Rea award was established in 1986 by Michael M. Rea, a publisher and collector.
BOOKS
June 5, 2005 | Millicent Dillon, Millicent Dillon is a novelist and biographer whose books include "You Are Not I: A Portrait of Paul Bowles" and "A Little Original Sin: The Life and Work of Jane Bowles."
When Virginia Spencer Carr wrote to Paul Bowles in 1991 explaining her desire to be his biographer, the novelist granted Carr permission but added that he was sure there would be "no malevolence" in her effort. By return mail, she writes in her biography's introduction, she assured him, "I was a straight arrow when it came to the truth, and that I had not a malevolent bone in my body."
NEWS
August 13, 1991 | CONSTANCE CASEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Michelle Green takes her title from the barroom comment of an ex-junkie to William Burroughs in 1955: "It's the end of the world, Tangier. Don't you feel it, Bill?" The place may have felt like the end of the world; it was certainly an escape from the world. Green describes post-World War II Tangier as a "deliciously depraved version of Eden." Homosexuality was accepted; you could get hashish anywhere and you could buy opium over the counter at your local pharmacy.
NEWS
February 22, 1993 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shrunken with old age and hobbled by a painful nerve ailment in his hips and legs, Paul Bowles still manages a smile when he recalls the scorpion hunts years ago in thesub-Saharan countryside. "Scorpions build holes in the roots of palmetto trees," the American novelist and composer recounts fondly. "My driver and I used to hunt them in October with sticks. We wet the ends of the sticks with saliva and stuck them in the holes.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2008
Book prize: Author Amy Hempel, whose candid takes on modern life have brought her a small but devoted following, has been named this year's winner of the Rea Award for the Short Story, a $30,000 prize that in previous years has been given to Paul Bowles, Eudora Welty and Grace Paley. The Rea award was established in 1986 by Michael M. Rea, a publisher and collector.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1996 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frieder Schlaich and Irene von Alberti's moody, gorgeous-looking "Halfmoon" is composed of three Paul Bowles short stories introduced by Bowles himself and dealing with the themes of temptation and revenge. They emerge as graceful, insightful vignettes set in beguiling exotic locales that add up to an exquisitely wrought, sophisticated diversion.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Catherine Warnow and Regina Weinrich's sprightly, 57-minute "Paul Bowles: The Complete Outsider" (opening Friday, with a premiere benefiting the Homestead Hospice and Shelter at the Nuart, where it will play one week) offers a tantalizing sketch of the legendary expatriate writer-composer who, at the suggestion of his mentor Gertrude Stein, moved to Tangier decades ago.
BOOKS
June 5, 2005 | Millicent Dillon, Millicent Dillon is a novelist and biographer whose books include "You Are Not I: A Portrait of Paul Bowles" and "A Little Original Sin: The Life and Work of Jane Bowles."
When Virginia Spencer Carr wrote to Paul Bowles in 1991 explaining her desire to be his biographer, the novelist granted Carr permission but added that he was sure there would be "no malevolence" in her effort. By return mail, she writes in her biography's introduction, she assured him, "I was a straight arrow when it came to the truth, and that I had not a malevolent bone in my body."
BOOKS
November 25, 2001 | JAMIE JAMES, Jamie James is a critic and travel writer based in Jakarta. His first novel, "Andrew and Joey," which is set in Bali, will be published in February. Many American masters of the short story devoted their craft to excavating the horror in everyday life; Paul Bowles examined the outer limits of human experience. and
Paul Bowles, poet-novelist-translator-composer-traveler, made his quirky mark in all those fields but dominated none of them in his long life, which spanned most of the last century. He seemed to invite criticism that he was a dabbler, putting much of his craft and ingenuity into concealing his artistry.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Owsley Brown's graceful "Night Waltz: The Music of Paul Bowles," which opens Friday at downtown L.A.'s Grande 4-Plex, 345 S. Figueroa St., reminds us that Bowles devoted the first half of his artistic career to composing music before settling in Tangier in 1947 to become the celebrated writer of "The Sheltering Sky" and other works.
NEWS
November 19, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In exotic post-World War II Tangier, the composer, translator, poet and writer Paul Bowles presided over a dazzling salon of expatriate American Beat writers whose counter-mainstream literature, often an acquired taste, won admiration.
BOOKS
June 21, 1998 | EDMUND WHITE, Edmund White recently completed a short biography of Marcel Proust. His most recent novel is "The Farewell Symphony."
I have a theory that the easiest way for a minor talent to become famous is to be the only celebrity in a city that everyone wants to visit. Peggy Guggenheim in Venice, Fernando Pessoa in Lisbon, Constantine Cavafy in Alexandria and Paul Bowles in Tangier. . . . In reading "You Are Not I," Millicent Dillon's frustrating attempts to spend some time alone with Bowles, I recalled my own single effort in the late 1980s when I went to interview him for Vogue.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1996 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frieder Schlaich and Irene von Alberti's moody, gorgeous-looking "Halfmoon" is composed of three Paul Bowles short stories introduced by Bowles himself and dealing with the themes of temptation and revenge. They emerge as graceful, insightful vignettes set in beguiling exotic locales that add up to an exquisitely wrought, sophisticated diversion.
NEWS
November 30, 1989 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
Memoirs of a Public Baby by Philip O'Connor. (W.W. Norton. $18.95. 229 pages.) If one mark of a good book is that it raises questions, then "Memoirs of a Public Baby" ought to be a good book. Questions spill out of virtually every page. To be sure, most of them are the same one: Why?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Catherine Warnow and Regina Weinrich's sprightly, 57-minute "Paul Bowles: The Complete Outsider" (opening Friday, with a premiere benefiting the Homestead Hospice and Shelter at the Nuart, where it will play one week) offers a tantalizing sketch of the legendary expatriate writer-composer who, at the suggestion of his mentor Gertrude Stein, moved to Tangier decades ago.
BOOKS
February 20, 1994 | Daniel Harris, Daniel Harris is a free-lance critic and essayist
In "A Distant Episode," one of Paul Bowles's most famous short stories, a linguist studying native dialects in Morocco asks the owner of a cafe to help him find a local curio: boxes made of camel udders. For reasons left unspecified, the owner takes offense, lures him onto the desert and dumps him amid a group of nomadic thieves who, siccing their dogs, ambush him in the darkness, beating him unconscious and then yanking his tongue taut to hack it off at its root.
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