Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPaul Butterfield
IN THE NEWS

Paul Butterfield

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 5, 1987 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
Paul Butterfield, a harmonica player who played a leading role in popularizing the blues with rock audiences in the 1960s, was found dead early Monday in his North Hollywood apartment, the Los Angeles County coroner's office said. He was 44. Coroner's spokesman Bill Gold said there "was no apparent cause of death" and that an autopsy would be performed. The body, clad in street clothes, was found in the kitchen of the apartment by Butterfield's manager, Jesse Turajskt, Gold said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 23, 1994 | JON MATSUMOTO
Just about every white blues musician in the '60s learned his or her craft by memorizing and mimicking records by the genre's great artists. But Paul Butterfield--who grew up in Chicago, the hub of the electric urban blues movement that developed after World War II--actually apprenticed with many of the legends.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 23, 1994 | JON MATSUMOTO
Just about every white blues musician in the '60s learned his or her craft by memorizing and mimicking records by the genre's great artists. But Paul Butterfield--who grew up in Chicago, the hub of the electric urban blues movement that developed after World War II--actually apprenticed with many of the legends.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1989
"The Woodstockers, 20 Years Later," Steve Hochman's article on the whereabouts of the musicians and others, should have brought back fond memories. Instead, it activated one of my pet peeves--that true talent and hard work do not equate to fame and fortune in rock and pop music. Absent from the roster is the band that from a standpoint of musicianship stood above all other Woodstock participants--the Butterfield Blues Band. Hochman's article is just another example of Paul Butterfield never getting his due. He was a singer of exceptional range, facility and power.
NEWS
May 8, 1987
Results of an autopsy on the body of blues musician Paul Butterfield will not be available for a month or more, a coroner's spokesman said. Butterfield, 44, who helped popularize the blues with rock music fans in the 1960s, was found dead Monday in his North Hollywood apartment. Police reported that it was possible that Butterfield's death was linked to drugs since drug paraphernalia was found in his apartment.
NEWS
May 6, 1987
Drug paraphernalia was discovered in the North Hollywood apartment of blues musician Paul Butterfield, who was found dead Monday, a Los Angeles police detective said. The body of Butterfield, 44, a harmonica player who played a central role in popularizing the blues with rock music fans in the 1960s, was found in the apartment's kitchen, North Hollywood Division Detective Philip Sowers said. The drug equipment, which he did not identify, was in another room, he said.
NEWS
June 13, 1987
Blues musician Paul Butterfield, who was found dead May 4 in his North Hollywood apartment, was the victim of an accidental drug overdose, said an autopsy report of the Los Angeles County coroner's office released Friday. "The death certificate will say 'acute intoxication with multiple drugs,' " coroner's spokesman Bill Gold said. The autopsy report said that "comprehensive laboratory tests revealed the presence of significant levels of morphine (heroin) . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1989
"The Woodstockers, 20 Years Later," Steve Hochman's article on the whereabouts of the musicians and others, should have brought back fond memories. Instead, it activated one of my pet peeves--that true talent and hard work do not equate to fame and fortune in rock and pop music. Absent from the roster is the band that from a standpoint of musicianship stood above all other Woodstock participants--the Butterfield Blues Band. Hochman's article is just another example of Paul Butterfield never getting his due. He was a singer of exceptional range, facility and power.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1986 | DON SNOWDEN
Paul Butterfield played a central role in popularizing the blues with the '60s rock audience, but the Chicago-born harmonica player/vocalist never really learned what the blues is about until seven years ago. "To make a long story short, my intestines burst," Butterfield, 43, said by phone from a Bay Area hotel during a brief round of California club dates.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2010
JAZZ Best known for agreeable crossover jazz and R&B, saxophonist David Sanborn has also recorded with the avant-garde-leaning Tim Berne and the powerhouse Paul Butterfield Blues Band. Here he will be joined by organist Joey DeFrancesco in a groove-ready trio setting. Catalina Bar & Grill, 6725 W. Sunset Blvd., Hollywood. 8 and 10 p.m. through Sat., 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Sun. $30-45. (323) 466-2210. http://www.catalinajazzclub.com.
NEWS
June 13, 1987
Blues musician Paul Butterfield, who was found dead May 4 in his North Hollywood apartment, was the victim of an accidental drug overdose, said an autopsy report of the Los Angeles County coroner's office released Friday. "The death certificate will say 'acute intoxication with multiple drugs,' " coroner's spokesman Bill Gold said. The autopsy report said that "comprehensive laboratory tests revealed the presence of significant levels of morphine (heroin) . . .
NEWS
May 8, 1987
Results of an autopsy on the body of blues musician Paul Butterfield will not be available for a month or more, a coroner's spokesman said. Butterfield, 44, who helped popularize the blues with rock music fans in the 1960s, was found dead Monday in his North Hollywood apartment. Police reported that it was possible that Butterfield's death was linked to drugs since drug paraphernalia was found in his apartment.
NEWS
May 6, 1987
Drug paraphernalia was discovered in the North Hollywood apartment of blues musician Paul Butterfield, who was found dead Monday, a Los Angeles police detective said. The body of Butterfield, 44, a harmonica player who played a central role in popularizing the blues with rock music fans in the 1960s, was found in the apartment's kitchen, North Hollywood Division Detective Philip Sowers said. The drug equipment, which he did not identify, was in another room, he said.
NEWS
May 5, 1987 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
Paul Butterfield, a harmonica player who played a leading role in popularizing the blues with rock audiences in the 1960s, was found dead early Monday in his North Hollywood apartment, the Los Angeles County coroner's office said. He was 44. Coroner's spokesman Bill Gold said there "was no apparent cause of death" and that an autopsy would be performed. The body, clad in street clothes, was found in the kitchen of the apartment by Butterfield's manager, Jesse Turajskt, Gold said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1986 | DON SNOWDEN
Paul Butterfield played a central role in popularizing the blues with the '60s rock audience, but the Chicago-born harmonica player/vocalist never really learned what the blues is about until seven years ago. "To make a long story short, my intestines burst," Butterfield, 43, said by phone from a Bay Area hotel during a brief round of California club dates.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2000 | STEVE HOCHMAN
If two young white kids who look like clean-cut grad students are going to call their band the North Mississippi Allstars and draw on the primal African American blues of that rural area, they'd better be good. They are. At times at the Troubadour on Monday, guitarist Luther Dickinson and his drummer brother Cody, with bassist Chris Chew, showed a stunning mastery of the raw rumble of the late legend Mississippi Fred McDowell and his more recent "discovery," R.L. Burnside.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|