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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2013
Former Massachusetts Gov. Paul Cellucci, 65, who became a vigorous fundraiser for research on ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, during his last years, died Saturday in Hudson, Mass. His death of complications from ALS was announced by the University of Massachusetts Medical School, where he led a campaign to raise money for research that ultimately brought in nearly $2 million. Cellucci had been diagnosed with ALS, a progressive neurodegenerative condition that affects nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord, several years before he publicly disclosed it in 2011.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2013
Former Massachusetts Gov. Paul Cellucci, 65, who became a vigorous fundraiser for research on ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, during his last years, died Saturday in Hudson, Mass. His death of complications from ALS was announced by the University of Massachusetts Medical School, where he led a campaign to raise money for research that ultimately brought in nearly $2 million. Cellucci had been diagnosed with ALS, a progressive neurodegenerative condition that affects nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord, several years before he publicly disclosed it in 2011.
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NEWS
April 6, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The Senate confirmed Massachusetts Gov. Paul Cellucci as ambassador to Canada despite the opposition of Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Jesse Helms (R-N.C.). Cellucci was approved on the Senate floor by voice vote and without debate. At a meeting of committee members, Helms indicated he would not block President Bush's choice, but had misgivings about Cellucci's positions on social issues. Cellucci is a pro-choice Republican.
NEWS
April 11, 2001 | From Associated Press
Republican Jane Swift took office Tuesday as Massachusetts governor--apparently, the first pregnant governor in U.S. history--and is sure to be watched closely for how she balances career and family. Swift, who was elevated from lieutenant governor, has a 2 1/2-year-old daughter and is expecting twins in June. She succeeds Gov. Paul Cellucci, who resigned to become U.S. ambassador to Canada. Swift, 36, has not said whether she will run for a full term in 2002 in this heavily Democratic state.
NEWS
April 11, 2001 | From Associated Press
Republican Jane Swift took office Tuesday as Massachusetts governor--apparently, the first pregnant governor in U.S. history--and is sure to be watched closely for how she balances career and family. Swift, who was elevated from lieutenant governor, has a 2 1/2-year-old daughter and is expecting twins in June. She succeeds Gov. Paul Cellucci, who resigned to become U.S. ambassador to Canada. Swift, 36, has not said whether she will run for a full term in 2002 in this heavily Democratic state.
NEWS
October 10, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
While Democrats at all levels fight to preserve a failing education system, Republican governors are taking bold steps to demand better results from students and teachers, Gov. Paul Cellucci of Massachusetts said. Cellucci, in the weekly GOP radio address, credited his fellow governors for bucking the status quo and using high-stakes tests to hold students and schools accountable.
NATIONAL
November 17, 2002 | From Times wire reports
Acting Gov. Jane Swift was diagnosed with viral meningitis after being admitted to a hospital with headaches and nausea. The illness is not life-threatening, but Swift, 37, will remain hospitalized for up to three days, said Dr. Troy Brennan of Brigham and Women's Hospital. "She's doing quite well," Brennan said. Swift became acting governor in 2001 after Paul Cellucci was appointed U.S. ambassador to Canada.
NEWS
August 19, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The head of the Massachusetts Port Authority resigned in Boston after it was learned that he went on a "booze cruise" paid for by his agency during which a woman bared her breasts. Peter Blute cited "recent errors in judgment" in a letter of resignation to Gov. Paul Cellucci. The Boston Herald said its reporters saw Blute and lobbyist Sandy Tennant, a top state Republican party official, drinking beer and champagne. At the end of the tour, the newspaper said, a passenger lifted her shirt.
NEWS
October 17, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Jane Swift, a candidate for lieutenant governor of Massachusetts, gave birth to her first child after her pregnancy pushed the issues of family and work to the fore. Swift didn't leave the campaign trail until two days before giving birth to 7-pound, 6-ounce Elizabeth Ruth Hunt. She may return to campaigning before the Nov. 3 election. Her pregnancy was never a big issue in a race tied more to the top of the paired ticket, GOP gubernatorial candidate Paul Cellucci.
NEWS
February 7, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Women who want to tone their bodies without men looking on can now sweat in peace, thanks to a state law signed by the governor. Not everyone is hailing it as a victory for women, though. The law is opposed by an unlikely coalition of men rebuffed by all-women health clubs, as well as the National Organization for Women. Gov.
NEWS
April 6, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The Senate confirmed Massachusetts Gov. Paul Cellucci as ambassador to Canada despite the opposition of Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Jesse Helms (R-N.C.). Cellucci was approved on the Senate floor by voice vote and without debate. At a meeting of committee members, Helms indicated he would not block President Bush's choice, but had misgivings about Cellucci's positions on social issues. Cellucci is a pro-choice Republican.
NEWS
April 12, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Massachusetts Gov. Paul Cellucci ousted the head of Boston's troubled "Big Dig" after a stinging federal audit claimed project managers hid crucial financial information about the huge highway project. Cellucci removed state Turnpike Authority Chairman James J. Kerasiotes after auditors detailed how Big Dig officials failed in February to report $1.4 billion in expected cost overruns to federal officials.
NEWS
June 27, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
So many aspiring educators flunked the state's first basic reading-and-writing test for teachers that officials graded them on a curve. The Board of Education voted this week to adjust the passing grade to reduce the number of those who failed from 56% to 44%, prompting outrage from acting Gov. Paul Cellucci. House Speaker Thomas Finneran said he has seen the tests and was appalled that candidates couldn't "define a noun or a verb or what democracy means or the meaning of the word 'imminent.' "
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