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Paul Crouch

NEWS
November 9, 1992 | RON RUSSELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During its 72 years as a Southern California institution, the Hollywood Bowl Easter Sunrise Service has overcome rainstorms, protest demonstrations and financial problems. But it now faces a struggle that supporters fear it may not survive. City officials have ordered the service to stop soliciting money. Once-generous donors have threatened it with lawsuits.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1991 | MARK PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with a Federal Communications Commission inquiry, the Tustin-based Trinity Broadcasting Network withdrew a subsidiary's application to buy a Philadelphia-area TV station after employees of the station and a broadcasting group questioned the subsidiary's claim that it is controlled by minorities. Trinity's attorney wrote the FCC on Oct. 1 to tell the commission that the subsidiary, National Minority TV Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1991 | MARK PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Federal Communications Commission has begun an inquiry into Trinity Broadcasting Network to determine whether a subsidiary of the worldwide Christian programming service is a bona fide minority organization or one controlled by Trinity founder and president Paul F. Crouch, officials said.
NEWS
January 3, 1991 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The plaintiff in a bitter, long-running suit against Tustin-based Trinity Broadcasting Network dropped the civil action in a New York court on Wednesday. Keith A. Houser, who had charged in court documents that the Christian television station he founded in Fishkill, N.Y.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1990 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several thousand of the faithful and the curious gathered at a shopping mall here Saturday for a Hollywood-style promotion of "China Cry," a feature film produced by Tustin television evangelist Paul F. Crouch. Such a glitzy event--complete with remote broadcasts, rap singers and a movie star--might be standard procedure in the movie business, but Saturday's razzle-dazzle was one of the few traditional things about Crouch's venture into the film industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1990 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Proclaiming that he is "not willing to surrender the motion-picture media to the devil," Trinity Broadcasting Network President Paul F. Crouch is breaking into the movie business with a $6-million feature film, aimed at mainstream theater audiences and financed entirely by donations. "China Cry" is based on the life of Chinese-American evangelist Nora Lam and carries the subtitle, "A True Story."
NEWS
September 7, 1990 | JOHN DART, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
A letter from the International Bible Society in Colorado Springs trumpets the following proposal: "For a gift of $25, you can give 10 believers in Russia their first Bible." A newsletter from the Costa Mesa-based Full Gospel Business Men's Fellowship International proudly proclaims: "Airlift to Armenia and Russia Dodges Bullets and Food Panic. Thousands Receive Christ."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1990 | Mark I. Pinsky
Although the Trinity Broadcasting Network's Paul F. Crouch has focused his energies on television and radio--amassing more than 200 stations around the world--his interest in the movies predates the controversy over "The Last Temptation of Christ." In a recent newsletter, Crouch recalled, as a youth "the sermons I heard preached on the evils of the silver screen. I was strictly forbidden to enter a motion picture theater under penalty of damnation.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1990 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Proclaiming that he is "not willing to surrender the motion picture media to the devil," Orange County televangelist Paul F. Crouch is breaking into the movie business with a $6-million feature film, aimed at mainstream theater audiences and financed entirely by donations. The film, "China Cry," is based on the life of Chinese-American evangelist Nora Lam and carries the subtitle, "A True Story."
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