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Paul F Crouch

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1989
Paul F. Crouch, founder and president of Tustin-based Trinity Broadcasting Network, was among 16 evangelical leaders who met with President Bush on Tuesday. The religious leaders requested the meeting because of what one called a "crisis of confidence" following Bush's statements last month indicating he opposes tuition tax credits for parents of private school students. Bush assured them he still favors the tax credits, adding, however, that because of budget restraints he is unable to push for them now, the White House said.
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BUSINESS
April 14, 1993 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Federal Communications Commission, citing evidence that Trinity Broadcasting Network used a minority "front" to acquire television stations, on Tuesday ordered a hearing to decide whether to strip the Orange County-based religious network of its station in Miami. If the FCC finds at the July 8 hearing that Trinity acted improperly, it may also fine the 24-hour-a-day Christian programming service $250,000.
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NEWS
May 19, 1989
A committee of the National Religious Broadcasters has urged Paul F. Crouch, president of Tustin-based Trinity Broadcasting Network, to seek "Christian arbitration" to resolve a bitter dispute with a former business associate. The decision appears to be at least a partial victory for Crouch's longtime adversary, the Rev. Keith A. Houser of Dallas, who has sought such a resolution for nearly three years. The NRB's five-member Ethics Committee strongly recommended that Crouch and Houser submit the "alleged business practices that relate to contractual disputes" to "a recognized Board of Christian Arbitration."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1990 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Proclaiming that he is "not willing to surrender the motion-picture media to the devil," Trinity Broadcasting Network President Paul F. Crouch is breaking into the movie business with a $6-million feature film, aimed at mainstream theater audiences and financed entirely by donations. "China Cry" is based on the life of Chinese-American evangelist Nora Lam and carries the subtitle, "A True Story."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
In 1973, two young ministers thought they had hit on just the right formula to change the world of religious broadcasting: a network that would feature innovative, upbeat Christian programming, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. But after only 6 months it became clear to Paul F. Crouch and Jim Bakker that the Orange County television station they chose as their laboratory--and the flagship for Trinity Broadcasting Network--was just too small for the ambitions of the two strong-willed men and their wives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1989 | TED JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Baptist minister Walter Martin, who interpreted the Scriptures to a generation of radio listeners as "The Bible Answer Man," died Monday morning at his home in San Juan Capistrano. He was 60. Although the cause of death was not disclosed, in recent years he suffered from diabetes and arterial ailments. Martin was founder and director of the Christian Research Institute, a nonprofit think tank in the Irvine Spectrum that publishes religious material and produces the radio show, broadcast weekday afternoons in more than 100 U.S. markets, including local KKLA (99.5 FM)
NEWS
April 9, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
As he awaits a decision this month on whether he will be allowed to remain a member of the National Religious Broadcasters, Tustin-based televangelist Paul F. Crouch faces a variety of complaints about how employees of his TV and radio empire have been treated and how the network acquires stations. Despite Crouch's contention that "a Christian organization should be held to higher ethical standards," his Trinity Broadcasting Network, with more than 400 employees and an annual payroll of nearly $5 million, now faces an investigation by the Ethics Committee of NRB. Subjects of the inquiry include: - Reported sex and age discrimination at a TBN-owned station in Tacoma, Wash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
Several theologians reacted with expressions of distaste and concern Wednesday to remarks by a Tustin TV broadcaster that he had prayed "for the wrath of God to fall on enemies" of his network. The Rev. Paul F. Crouch said that he had prayed against people who were "attempting to take the license" of his flagship Christian broadcasting station in Orange County and that "I probably did pray that God would kill anyone or anything that was attempting to destroy the ministry."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
As he awaits a decision this month on whether he will be allowed to remain a member of the National Religious Broadcasters, Tustin-based televangelist Paul F. Crouch faces a variety of complaints about how employees of his far-flung TV and radio empire have been treated and how the network acquires stations. Despite Crouch's contention that "a Christian organization should be held to higher ethical standards," his network, with more than 400 employees and an annual payroll of nearly $5 million, now faces an investigation by the Ethics Committee of NRB. Subjects of the inquiry include: Reported sex and age discrimination at a TBN-owned station in Tacoma, Wash.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1990 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Proclaiming that he is "not willing to surrender the motion-picture media to the devil," Trinity Broadcasting Network President Paul F. Crouch is breaking into the movie business with a $6-million feature film, aimed at mainstream theater audiences and financed entirely by donations. "China Cry" is based on the life of Chinese-American evangelist Nora Lam and carries the subtitle, "A True Story."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1990 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Proclaiming that he is "not willing to surrender the motion picture media to the devil," Orange County televangelist Paul F. Crouch is breaking into the movie business with a $6-million feature film, aimed at mainstream theater audiences and financed entirely by donations. The film, "China Cry," is based on the life of Chinese-American evangelist Nora Lam and carries the subtitle, "A True Story."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1989 | TED JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Baptist minister Walter Martin, who interpreted the Scriptures to a generation of radio listeners as "The Bible Answer Man," died Monday morning at his home in San Juan Capistrano. He was 60. Although the cause of death was not disclosed, in recent years he suffered from diabetes and arterial ailments. Martin was founder and director of the Christian Research Institute, a nonprofit think tank in the Irvine Spectrum that publishes religious material and produces the radio show, broadcast weekday afternoons in more than 100 U.S. markets, including local KKLA (99.5 FM)
NEWS
May 19, 1989
A committee of the National Religious Broadcasters has urged Paul F. Crouch, president of Tustin-based Trinity Broadcasting Network, to seek "Christian arbitration" to resolve a bitter dispute with a former business associate. The decision appears to be at least a partial victory for Crouch's longtime adversary, the Rev. Keith A. Houser of Dallas, who has sought such a resolution for nearly three years. The NRB's five-member Ethics Committee strongly recommended that Crouch and Houser submit the "alleged business practices that relate to contractual disputes" to "a recognized Board of Christian Arbitration."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1989
Paul F. Crouch, founder and president of Tustin-based Trinity Broadcasting Network, was among 16 evangelical leaders who met with President Bush on Tuesday. The religious leaders requested the meeting because of what one called a "crisis of confidence" following Bush's statements last month indicating he opposes tuition tax credits for parents of private school students. Bush assured them he still favors the tax credits, adding, however, that because of budget restraints he is unable to push for them now, the White House said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
As he awaits a decision this month on whether he will be allowed to remain a member of the National Religious Broadcasters, Tustin-based televangelist Paul F. Crouch faces a variety of complaints about how employees of his far-flung TV and radio empire have been treated and how the network acquires stations. Despite Crouch's contention that "a Christian organization should be held to higher ethical standards," his network, with more than 400 employees and an annual payroll of nearly $5 million, now faces an investigation by the Ethics Committee of NRB. Subjects of the inquiry include: Reported sex and age discrimination at a TBN-owned station in Tacoma, Wash.
NEWS
April 9, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
As he awaits a decision this month on whether he will be allowed to remain a member of the National Religious Broadcasters, Tustin-based televangelist Paul F. Crouch faces a variety of complaints about how employees of his TV and radio empire have been treated and how the network acquires stations. Despite Crouch's contention that "a Christian organization should be held to higher ethical standards," his Trinity Broadcasting Network, with more than 400 employees and an annual payroll of nearly $5 million, now faces an investigation by the Ethics Committee of NRB. Subjects of the inquiry include: - Reported sex and age discrimination at a TBN-owned station in Tacoma, Wash.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1990 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Proclaiming that he is "not willing to surrender the motion picture media to the devil," Orange County televangelist Paul F. Crouch is breaking into the movie business with a $6-million feature film, aimed at mainstream theater audiences and financed entirely by donations. The film, "China Cry," is based on the life of Chinese-American evangelist Nora Lam and carries the subtitle, "A True Story."
BUSINESS
April 14, 1993 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Federal Communications Commission, citing evidence that Trinity Broadcasting Network used a minority "front" to acquire television stations, on Tuesday ordered a hearing to decide whether to strip the Orange County-based religious network of its station in Miami. If the FCC finds at the July 8 hearing that Trinity acted improperly, it may also fine the 24-hour-a-day Christian programming service $250,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
In 1973, two young ministers thought they had hit on just the right formula to change the world of religious broadcasting: a network that would feature innovative, upbeat Christian programming, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. But after only 6 months it became clear to Paul F. Crouch and Jim Bakker that the Orange County television station they chose as their laboratory--and the flagship for Trinity Broadcasting Network--was just too small for the ambitions of the two strong-willed men and their wives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
Several theologians reacted with expressions of distaste and concern Wednesday to remarks by a Tustin TV broadcaster that he had prayed "for the wrath of God to fall on enemies" of his network. The Rev. Paul F. Crouch said that he had prayed against people who were "attempting to take the license" of his flagship Christian broadcasting station in Orange County and that "I probably did pray that God would kill anyone or anything that was attempting to destroy the ministry."
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