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NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
After so many egregious misappropriations of Native American culture by fashion brands (“Navajo” T-shirts at Urban Outfitters and feather headdresses on the runway at Victoria's Secret), it was interesting to see this come across my email. The whimsical Los Angeles-based Paul Frank , the brand that turned a sock monkey into a fashion statement, is collaborating with four different tribes in regions across the country in what seems to be an authentic way, giving artists the opportunity to design accessories for a special “Paul Frank Presents” collection launching in August on PaulFrank.com.
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NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
On Tuesday, I wrote a post about the new "Paul Frank Presents" collection of accessories designed in collaboration with Native American artists. After so many egregious misappropriations of Native American culture by fashion brands (“Navajo” T-shirts at  Urban Outfitters  and feather headdresses on the runway at Victoria's Secret), I wrote that it was heartening to learn that Los Angeles-based  Paul Frank , the brand that turned a sock monkey into a fashion statement, announced it is collaborating with four tribes in regions across the country in what seemed to be an authentic way, giving artists the opportunity to design accessories for a special collection launching in August on PaulFrank.com.
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BUSINESS
November 8, 2000 | LESLIE EARNEST
Designer Paul Frank, whose monkey-faced clothes and accessories have caught on with young shoppers and the whimsically inclined, is set to launch a new venture--his first store. Costa Mesa-based Paul Frank Industries Inc. is opening the store in San Francisco for the simplest of reasons. "It's our No. 1 market," said Ryan Heuser, president and co-founder. San Franciscans understand Paul Frank's wit, "cuteness" and sarcasm, he said.
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
After so many egregious misappropriations of Native American culture by fashion brands (“Navajo” T-shirts at Urban Outfitters and feather headdresses on the runway at Victoria's Secret), it was interesting to see this come across my email. The whimsical Los Angeles-based Paul Frank , the brand that turned a sock monkey into a fashion statement, is collaborating with four different tribes in regions across the country in what seems to be an authentic way, giving artists the opportunity to design accessories for a special “Paul Frank Presents” collection launching in August on PaulFrank.com.
NEWS
November 13, 1998 | ROSE APODACA JONES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the 1968 cinematic classic "Planet of the Apes," Charlton Heston's astronaut character returns to Earth to find it inhabited by monkey men in leisure wear. Fast forward. Thousands of e-mails sent over the Internet last week goaded readers to don masks to trick senator-returned-astronaut John Glenn into believing he'd met the same fate. Computer geeks. If they tracked the hip radar, they'd know that monkey madness has already enslaved fashion sects in the form of handbags, socks and wallets.
NEWS
November 8, 2001
Those on the forefront of fashion will have noticed that monkey faces have popped up in various places. Handbags. Purses. T-shirts. Belts. Socks. Watches. Doormats. The monkey is Julius, and he's the marquee of designer Paul Frank. Julius has friends--Clancy, the world's shortest giraffe; Worry Bear, a neurotic and timid ball of fuzz; Ellie, the optimistic elephant; and Scurvy, a wisecracking, tale-telling skull and crossbones.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2006 | Leslie Earnest, Times Staff Writer
For the first time since he was fired in November, designer Paul Frank Sunich walked last week into the Los Angeles store that bears his name and took stock. The co-founder of Paul Frank Industries Inc. touched T-shirts decorated with whimsical characters he created -- including Julius, the cheeky monkey, and Clancy, the world's smallest giraffe. He pointed out a clock he had made by hand and a purse stitched from vinyl upholstery from a pickup truck.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2005 | Leslie Earnest, Times Staff Writer
Paul Frank, who turned the image of a whimsical monkey into the foundation for a global apparel and accessory business bearing his name, has split from the company, it was announced Tuesday. The 38-year-old designer left "to pursue other interests," Costa Mesa-based Paul Frank Industries Inc. said in a statement, declining to elaborate. Frank, who began selling vinyl wallets in Huntington Beach in 1995, could not be reached for comment.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Paul Frank Sunich, the artist whose image of Julius the monkey decorates T-shirts and accessories sold in Paul Frank stores, sued the company he started, saying he was improperly fired last year. Paul Frank Industries Inc. fired Sunich in November "without cause," according to a complaint filed in federal court in Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2008 | Tiffany Hsu, Times Staff Writer
The gig: President and co-founder of Paul Frank Industries Inc., a clothing and accessories company based in a former school building in Costa Mesa. The private company, which has about 100 employees, puts a host of eccentric characters on products as varied as baby bibs and bicycles. It has 37 of its own stores and sells its wares in thousands of other locations across more than 50 countries.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2011 | By Meg James, Los Angeles Times
Julius is prepping for his Hollywood close-up. Last summer, Los Angeles billionaire Haim Saban bagged the chimp, spending about $50 million to buy Paul Frank Industries, the Orange County company that turned a whimsical drawing of a wide-mouthed sock monkey into a global fashion statement. Now, Saban's team is developing a promotional blitz to catapult Julius from smirking slacker found on vinyl wallets and T-shirts into a bankable media star. Saban Brands on Tuesday will unveil plans for the primate to headline a prime-time television animated Christmas special next year, a project that is intended to land Julius on the cartoon A-list along with such august characters as Charlie Brown and the Grinch.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2010 | By Meg James, Los Angeles Times
Power Rangers, meet the monkeys. Haim Saban, who became a television tycoon by bringing the "Power Rangers" series to the U.S., has bought Paul Frank Industries Inc., a Southern California design, licensing and retail operation that began nearly 15 years ago in a Huntington Beach garage. Its trademark Julius the monkey icon — a whimsical twist on the old-school sock monkey — adorns a line of apparel and accessories, including baby bibs, canvas bags, bike helmets and Lip Smackers brand lip balm.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2008 | Tiffany Hsu, Times Staff Writer
The gig: President and co-founder of Paul Frank Industries Inc., a clothing and accessories company based in a former school building in Costa Mesa. The private company, which has about 100 employees, puts a host of eccentric characters on products as varied as baby bibs and bicycles. It has 37 of its own stores and sells its wares in thousands of other locations across more than 50 countries.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2006 | Leslie Earnest
An Orange County judge has declined to issue an order preventing Paul Frank Sunich from using his name while a legal battle is unfolding between the designer and the company he co-founded. Paul Frank Industries Inc. in Costa Mesa, best known for the monkey face that appears on many of its products, had objected to Sunich using the name "Paul Frank Design" on a website after the apparel and accessories maker fired him in November. But U.S. District Judge Cormac J.
NEWS
April 4, 2006 | Brian Hanrahan and Mike Anton, Times Staff Writers
Undiplomatic language Americans just seem to have an aversion to paying tolls to the British (see "Tea Party, Boston"), so when traffic managers in downtown London began charging drivers a "congestion fee," the U.S. Embassy decided the fee was really a tax, and staffers started waving their diplomatic immunity at the tollbooth. That doesn't sit well with the feisty mayor of London, Ken Livingstone. He says the U.S.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2006 | Leslie Earnest, Times Staff Writer
For the first time since he was fired in November, designer Paul Frank Sunich walked last week into the Los Angeles store that bears his name and took stock. The co-founder of Paul Frank Industries Inc. touched T-shirts decorated with whimsical characters he created -- including Julius, the cheeky monkey, and Clancy, the world's smallest giraffe. He pointed out a clock he had made by hand and a purse stitched from vinyl upholstery from a pickup truck.
MAGAZINE
June 20, 1999 | Leslee Komaiko
In 1993, Huntington Beach native Paul Frank decided to jazz up a pair of Jack Purcells sneakers by stitching on some vinyl stripes he got from an auto upholstery shop. But the shoes didn't fit through his sewing machine--duh!--so Frank refashioned the vinyl into gift key chains, wallets and a purse. Inspired by a sock monkey his grandmother had made for him, Frank came up with a lovable cartoon primate with a wide red mouth, named Julius, to adorn his accessories.
MAGAZINE
October 6, 2002 | ANDREW ASCH
Paul Frank's first fashion successes were like early Beatles hits--cheeky, packed with gently satiric humor and enthusiastically embraced by (mostly) girls and their smart alecky older sisters. But when the Newport Beach-based designer began brainstorming ideas for men's threads in 1999, he made a choice that would give a music industry executive heart palpitations: The man made his proven star scarce on the new project.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2006 | Leslie Earnest, Times Staff Writer
Artist Paul Frank, whose doodling launched a multimillion-dollar clothing and accessories empire, is reaching for the eraser. The designer filed a lawsuit this week against Costa Mesa-based Paul Frank Industries to shut it down. He alleged that company President Ryan Heuser and Chief Executive John Oswald fired him in November "without cause" and that the executives were paying themselves excessive salaries.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Paul Frank Sunich, the artist whose image of Julius the monkey decorates T-shirts and accessories sold in Paul Frank stores, sued the company he started, saying he was improperly fired last year. Paul Frank Industries Inc. fired Sunich in November "without cause," according to a complaint filed in federal court in Los Angeles.
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