Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPaul Germain
IN THE NEWS

Paul Germain

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1996
"View From the Rug Up" (TV Times, July 21) presented an inaccurate account of the creation and production of the Nickelodeon series "Rugrats." As the story editors of the original five seasons of "Rugrats," we'd like to set the record straight. The piece presents Arlene Klasky and Gabor Csupo as the prime movers behind the show, and only toward the end of the article is Paul Germain mentioned in passing as someone they "created 'Rugrats' with." In fact, Paul Germain was instrumental not only in creating the series but in producing every one of the 65 original episodes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2001 | MONA GABLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Paul Germain and Joe Ansolabehere maybemiddle-ageddadswithbigfancyjobsinHollywood,buttheystill take recess very seriously. And the idea that some small-minded adults are out to destroy the playground ritual gets them downright animated. "Our feeling is, you only get to be a kid once," laments Ansolabehere, in his office on the Disney lot in Burbank. He's talking about a political movement to cut recess by adding more days to the school year.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2001 | MONA GABLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Paul Germain and Joe Ansolabehere maybemiddle-ageddadswithbigfancyjobsinHollywood,buttheystill take recess very seriously. And the idea that some small-minded adults are out to destroy the playground ritual gets them downright animated. "Our feeling is, you only get to be a kid once," laments Ansolabehere, in his office on the Disney lot in Burbank. He's talking about a political movement to cut recess by adding more days to the school year.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1996
"View From the Rug Up" (TV Times, July 21) presented an inaccurate account of the creation and production of the Nickelodeon series "Rugrats." As the story editors of the original five seasons of "Rugrats," we'd like to set the record straight. The piece presents Arlene Klasky and Gabor Csupo as the prime movers behind the show, and only toward the end of the article is Paul Germain mentioned in passing as someone they "created 'Rugrats' with." In fact, Paul Germain was instrumental not only in creating the series but in producing every one of the 65 original episodes.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2001 | MILES BELLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Recess: School's Out" registers as complacent yet competent animation kids will enjoy despite its mundane nature. Based on the cartoon series "Disney's Recess," on ABC and also airing on UPN and in syndication, this animation piffle was originally envisioned as a video movie. And though "Recess," the feature film, is far from innovative, it is agreeable. This big-screen enlargement of the small-screen series presents T.J.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1998
As the former senior story editor of "Rugrats," I was naturally delighted to see your cover story on the show ("Talk About a Baby Boom," by Paul Brownfield, Aug. 16). I was even more delighted to see that, for once, Paul Germain received due credit as a main creative force behind the series. I'm sorry that so much of your article was devoted to behind-the-scenes squabbling on the show. Sure, the writers had some creative differences with Arlene Klasky and Gabor Csupo, and all of us together, as usual, had to battle the inexhaustible determination of network executives to make sure that nothing funny, intelligent or different ever gets on the air. "Rugrats" may have been what is termed a "writer-driven" show, but its charm derives in large part from the distinctive Klasky Csupo art style (there was a reason Paul chose this studio over numerous competitors to produce "The Simpsons")
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2001 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first glance, Disney's new Saturday morning ABC series "Lloyd in Space," premiering today, resembles any number of other animated shows about the offbeat lives of weird, unearthly-looking cartoon kids, albeit with overtones of "The Jetsons" redux.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1999 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the actor dressed as a glittery silver flashlight shouted into the Universal Amphitheatre audience, "A baby's gotta do. . . . " and paused, hundreds of pint-sized audience members, bouncing in their seats, finished the sentence with a deafening roar of in-the-know gusto: ". . . what a baby's gotta do!" Yep, it's the Rugrats, in the flesh--or rather, in the foam.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1999 | CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Ovitz is diversifying his new talent management company to include representation of some of television's leading animators. In doing so, he has struck a deal with Ellen Goldsmith-Vein to merge her successful 5-year-old animation management company, Gotham Group, into his Artists Management Group.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2003 | Michael Mallory, Special to The Times
They're a bunch of cartoon babies who consistently delivered top ratings over 12 seasons, nabbed four Emmys, spawned three successful feature films and created a huge merchandizing presence. Trouble is, real-life children grow up. Now the kids' network Nickelodeon and animation studio Klasky-Csupo have done something unprecedented in animation: allowed the characters to grow up too.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2001 | CHARLES SOLOMON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Disney's "Recess: School's Out," which has grossed about $30 million in three weeks, demonstrates the box-office potential of low-budget animated features based on popular children's television shows. It also reveals a problem that has dogged many of these films: the villain or threat confronting these kids is simply too big for the child heroes to tackle plausibly.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1998 | Paul Brownfield, Paul Brownfield is a Times staff writer
If a baby could talk, and he happened upon a toilet for the first time in his life, what would he say? That was the rough premise of the six-minute animated short that the team of Gabor Csupo, Arlene Klasky and Paul Germain brought to Nickelodeon in 1989.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|