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Paul Junger Witt

ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1985 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
TV is getting scarier and scarier. It's bad enough that the lead stories on the late news are usually about death and destruction, famine and pestilence, fires and car crashes, child abuse, sex crimes, war and every other calamity known to man--and even some new ones. It's bad enough that much of prime-time drama is a blood bath where people are always getting shot, mashed, run over, beaten up or otherwise victimized by man or disease. Now comedies are jumping on the scare bandwagon.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1992 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Check it out, man! Cheech Marin has gone mainstream. Not only is he a regular on CBS' "The Golden Palace," the revamped version of the long-running sitcom "The Golden Girls," but Marin also is releasing his first children's album at the end of October. Marin, who with ex-partner Tommy Chong rose to fame in the 1970s as the successful counterculture comedy team Cheech and Chong, admits that he has consciously attempted to separate himself from his drugged-out "Cheech" persona.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1992 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The filmmaking generation that grew up with Alfred Hitchcock created thrillers that at worst were Hitchcock rip-offs and, at best, as with prime Brian De Palma, neo-Hitchcock fantasias. The new psychological thriller "Final Analysis" (citywide) is directed by Phil Joanou, who is still in his 20s and one of the first thriller filmmakers of the post-De Palma era. Although shrouded in the immense shadow of The Master, most of the film's effects are derived not from Hitchcock but from his imitators.
NEWS
September 13, 1992 | STEVEN HERBERT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Golden Palace" is a series that almost wasn't. When Bea Arthur announced that she was leaving "The Golden Girls" at the conclusion of last season, Betty White felt that the series was doomed. White and co-star Estelle Getty met with executive producers Paul Junger Witt and Tony Thomas earlier this year. "Susan Harris (the series' creator and another executive producer) had come up with an idea to keep it going," White said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1990 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Will too much of a good thing turn out to be a bad thing? There is not always strength in numbers. The danger exists that the sheer crush of this week's programming keyed to Sunday's 20th anniversary of Earth Day will be ultimately less illuminating and motivating than desensitizing. It all gets to be a blur. If there's one of these programs that makes unique use of television, however, it's the ambitious, two-hour "Time Warner Presents the Earth Day Special" at 9 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1994 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Mixed Nuts" is a farcical whirligig that doesn't whirl. It's energetically unfunny, like "Radioland Murders," and, like that film, it boasts top-flight talent. Maybe the idea of making a comedy about a suicide prevention center just got to everyone--it's a bummed-out comedy about being bummed out. Steve Martin plays Philip, the head of a Venice, Calif.-based suicide hotline service called Lifesavers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2000 | BRIAN LOWRY and SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Richard Mulligan, the rubber-faced actor best known for his Emmy-winning comedic roles in the television series "Soap" and "Empty Nest," has died. He was 67. Mulligan, who died Tuesday at his home in Hollywood after a long battle with cancer, earned an Emmy in 1989 for his performance in "Empty Nest," in which he played Dr. Harry Weston, the widowed father of three grown daughters.
NEWS
August 13, 1989 | MARY LOU LOPER, Times Staff Writer
"I think this is as close to heaven as most of us are going to get," said Katherine Abercrombie (her husband, Stewart, was in polo whites) as she and her co-patron chairwoman Cecelia Dalsemer, wearing a Faberge gold double-horse pin, looked about at the beauty of the Santa Barbara Polo and Racquet Club in Carpinteria.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1995 | DANIEL HOWARD CERONE and JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
If there was ever a case of good news-bad news for the television production business, it occurred this week, following the proposed mergers of Walt Disney Co. with Capital Cities/ABC Inc. and Westinghouse Electric Corp. with CBS Inc. The good news, many producers said Wednesday, is that CBS will return to the hands of broadcasters.
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