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Paul Krassner

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1993 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Paul Krassner owes a debt of gratitude to the FBI. When Life magazine published a profile in 1968 of Krassner and his off-the-wall satirical publication, The Realist, it prompted this letter to the editor: "To classify Krassner as some sort of 'social rebel' is far too cute. He's a nut, a raving, unconfined nut. As for any possible intellectual rewards to be gleaned from The Realist--much better prose may be found on lavatory walls."
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NEWS
July 11, 2002 | TONY PEYSER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
MURDER AT THE CONSPIRACY CONVENTION AND OTHER AMERICAN ABSURDITIES By Paul Krassner Barricade Books 332 pages, $17.95 Yippie, prankster, left-leaning realist, Paul Krassner is at it again.
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NEWS
November 2, 1993 | KAREN STABINER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The hyperbolic title of this comic memoir by Realist magazine editor and man-about-the-countercultural-town Paul Krassner sets the tone for the 336 pages that follow. Make no mistake about it: Krassner is the thread that runs through the social revolution. He is the hub of the alternative wheel. Like Woody Allen's Zelig, he seems to have been present at every important moment in recent left-wing history--or at least all of the marginally legal ones.
NEWS
June 24, 2002 | Al Martinez
I was the only one wearing polyester at the Paul Krassner party. I had on the dark blazer that I take to places where I'm not sure what to wear. Everyone else was in denim, except for those in corduroy. At least one man wore overalls. I had on Dockers. It was Krassner night at the Midnight Special, a bookstore in Santa Monica's Third Street Promenade that furnishes a back room where authors can hustle their latest work. I've hustled there too, groveling like a pig to make 12 cents on the dollar.
NEWS
July 11, 2002 | TONY PEYSER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
MURDER AT THE CONSPIRACY CONVENTION AND OTHER AMERICAN ABSURDITIES By Paul Krassner Barricade Books 332 pages, $17.95 Yippie, prankster, left-leaning realist, Paul Krassner is at it again.
NEWS
June 24, 2002 | Al Martinez
I was the only one wearing polyester at the Paul Krassner party. I had on the dark blazer that I take to places where I'm not sure what to wear. Everyone else was in denim, except for those in corduroy. At least one man wore overalls. I had on Dockers. It was Krassner night at the Midnight Special, a bookstore in Santa Monica's Third Street Promenade that furnishes a back room where authors can hustle their latest work. I've hustled there too, groveling like a pig to make 12 cents on the dollar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1997 | AL MARTINEZ
For those who, due to youth or chemical addiction, missed the 1960s, I have good news: They're back. I don't mean the rioting or the perfume of the decade called tear gas, but those less boisterous elements that became a hallmark of an era that will live in, well, infamy. A sense of the '60s, like Banquo's ghost, is wafting over the city. I began feeling that way with the passage of the marijuana initiative last November. L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2000 | AL MARTINEZ
When you first meet social satirist Paul Krassner you don't know whether he's smiling or grimacing, but after a while you figure it's somewhere in between. Like all good satirists, he's glad there's something to satirize, such as the currentelectionfiasco (that's one word now), but, like Bill Clinton, he also feels our pain.
NEWS
January 10, 2000 | MERLE RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"When I launched the Realist . . . in 1958," recalls former Yippie Paul Krassner in his introduction to this collection of interviews from his satirical magazine, "I was a lone voice, but irreverence has since become an industry." Krassner's offbeat magazine, the Realist, may never have had a large circulation, but it stands as a vivid example of the exuberant, no-holds-barred spirit of the 1960s.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1988
In his article on the death of "Wilton North," author Paul Krassner failed to mention one of that program's most embarrassing segments--his own "Alternative News." He was not merely an observer of that show's demise; he was one of the executioners. BYRON SHELDON Sherman Oaks
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2000 | AL MARTINEZ
When you first meet social satirist Paul Krassner you don't know whether he's smiling or grimacing, but after a while you figure it's somewhere in between. Like all good satirists, he's glad there's something to satirize, such as the currentelectionfiasco (that's one word now), but, like Bill Clinton, he also feels our pain.
NEWS
January 10, 2000 | MERLE RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"When I launched the Realist . . . in 1958," recalls former Yippie Paul Krassner in his introduction to this collection of interviews from his satirical magazine, "I was a lone voice, but irreverence has since become an industry." Krassner's offbeat magazine, the Realist, may never have had a large circulation, but it stands as a vivid example of the exuberant, no-holds-barred spirit of the 1960s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1997 | AL MARTINEZ
For those who, due to youth or chemical addiction, missed the 1960s, I have good news: They're back. I don't mean the rioting or the perfume of the decade called tear gas, but those less boisterous elements that became a hallmark of an era that will live in, well, infamy. A sense of the '60s, like Banquo's ghost, is wafting over the city. I began feeling that way with the passage of the marijuana initiative last November. L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1993 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Paul Krassner owes a debt of gratitude to the FBI. When Life magazine published a profile in 1968 of Krassner and his off-the-wall satirical publication, The Realist, it prompted this letter to the editor: "To classify Krassner as some sort of 'social rebel' is far too cute. He's a nut, a raving, unconfined nut. As for any possible intellectual rewards to be gleaned from The Realist--much better prose may be found on lavatory walls."
NEWS
November 2, 1993 | KAREN STABINER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The hyperbolic title of this comic memoir by Realist magazine editor and man-about-the-countercultural-town Paul Krassner sets the tone for the 336 pages that follow. Make no mistake about it: Krassner is the thread that runs through the social revolution. He is the hub of the alternative wheel. Like Woody Allen's Zelig, he seems to have been present at every important moment in recent left-wing history--or at least all of the marginally legal ones.
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