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Paul Monette

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February 19, 1995 | ROBERT DAWIDOFF, Robert Dawidoff is a professor of history at the Claremont Graduate School
Paul Monette died last week after a valiant struggle with AIDS. He will be remembered by the reading and writing public for changing the way we thought about AIDS and about being gay and lesbian. He will also be remembered as a courageous writer who took heart from his talent and redeemed catastrophe in the way that artists can. For from Monette's writing we learn that the worst that life can bring can be transformed into lasting writing, full of feeling and experience and wisdom.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 14, 1998 | David Chute
Monte Bramer's "Paul Monette: The Brink of Summer's End" is a powerful record of a life devoted stubbornly, even heroically, to self-expression. An openly gay poet and novelist ("The Long Shot"), Monette (pictured) won a National Book Award in 1992 for his memoir "Becoming a Man: Half a Life Story." "I'm not dying of AIDS," Monette insists. "I'm dying of homophobia." In this film, and in the most literal possible sense, we can see where Paul Monette was coming from (KCET Friday at 9 p.m.).
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NEWS
June 14, 1998 | David Chute
Monte Bramer's "Paul Monette: The Brink of Summer's End" is a powerful record of a life devoted stubbornly, even heroically, to self-expression. An openly gay poet and novelist ("The Long Shot"), Monette (pictured) won a National Book Award in 1992 for his memoir "Becoming a Man: Half a Life Story." "I'm not dying of AIDS," Monette insists. "I'm dying of homophobia." In this film, and in the most literal possible sense, we can see where Paul Monette was coming from (KCET Friday at 9 p.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1998 | DAVID CHUTE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It is sometimes difficult, and perhaps even wrongheaded, to cling to normal critical standards when judging documentaries. The complex force of something real can be overpowering, even when the best that can be said is that the filmmaker doesn't impose himself between the viewer and the material. Monte Bramer's "Paul Monette: The Brink of Summer's End" is a case in point.
NEWS
February 18, 1995
A memorial service for Paul Monette, the first person with AIDS to win a National Book Award, is scheduled for 10 a.m. Sunday at the Directors Guild of America, at Sunset Boulevard and Fairfax Avenue. The writer died of complications from AIDS on Feb. 10 at age 49. He had requested that any memorial contributions be made to Starcross, a community for children with AIDS, at 34500 Annapolis Road, Annapolis, Calif. 95412.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1998 | DAVID CHUTE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It is sometimes difficult, and perhaps even wrongheaded, to cling to normal critical standards when judging documentaries. The complex force of something real can be overpowering, even when the best that can be said is that the filmmaker doesn't impose himself between the viewer and the material. Monte Bramer's "Paul Monette: The Brink of Summer's End" is a case in point.
BOOKS
April 15, 1990 | Aram Saroyan
" . . . an affecting novel of gay mid-life in the epoch of AIDS. Monette's prose has an engrossing, loose fluency . . . "
BOOKS
March 4, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
In this often moving chronicle, Paul Monette describes the 19-month battle his lover, Roger Horwitz, waged against AIDS. A deeply felt account of love and sorrow, "Borrowed Time" recounts how the two men strove to preserve the life they shared, despite Horwitz's inevitable decline. The luxuriousness of that life often undercuts the story: Monette and Horwitz had wealth and connections that enabled them to obtain comforts and experimental treatments not available to other patients.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1995 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Paul Monette, whose written works include an autobiography that traced his tortuous path from the stigmas of homosexuality and a memoir detailing the agonizing AIDS death of his lover--both of which brought him national honors--has died of the disease that dominated his life and his work for more than a decade. Monette, believed to be the first AIDS patient to ever win a National Book Award, was 49.
BOOKS
June 28, 1992 | Robert Dawidoff, Dawidoff is the author of "The Genteel Tradition and the Sacred Rage: High Culture vs. Democracy in Adams, James and Santayana" (University of North Carolina Press). He chairs the history program at Claremont Graduate School
Nobody has written this book before, but countless men and women have lived the life Paul Monette describes in his new autobiography. "Becoming a Man" tells the story of the closet that most gay men and lesbians inhabit from the time they intuit that their sexual orientation is stigmatized, when the apparatus of society and the intimacies of family become rapids to be negotiated.
BOOKS
February 16, 1997 | ADAM MARS-JONES, Adam Mars-Jones is the author of "Monopolies of Loss" (Random House) and "The Waters of Thirst" (Alfred A. Knopf)
Paul Monette is best known for memoirs of mortality and masculinity--for "Borrowed Time," a book about his lover's sufferings with HIV, and for "Becoming a Man," which won the National Book Award. "Sanctuary," his last piece of writing, completed before his death in 1995, is a very different style of work, an animal fable subtitled "A Tale of Life in the Woods."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1995 | AL MARTINEZ
The trail through Temescal Gateway Park is tree-shaded and cool, winding past a stream that splashes over rocks and curves around tall reeds. Feathery ceanothus bushes dust the surrounding hillsides with pale blues and shades of muted white, and the buds of the sycamores struggle to burst into life on a day that hints of spring.
BOOKS
February 19, 1995 | ROBERT DAWIDOFF, Robert Dawidoff is a professor of history at the Claremont Graduate School
Paul Monette died last week after a valiant struggle with AIDS. He will be remembered by the reading and writing public for changing the way we thought about AIDS and about being gay and lesbian. He will also be remembered as a courageous writer who took heart from his talent and redeemed catastrophe in the way that artists can. For from Monette's writing we learn that the worst that life can bring can be transformed into lasting writing, full of feeling and experience and wisdom.
NEWS
February 18, 1995
A memorial service for Paul Monette, the first person with AIDS to win a National Book Award, is scheduled for 10 a.m. Sunday at the Directors Guild of America, at Sunset Boulevard and Fairfax Avenue. The writer died of complications from AIDS on Feb. 10 at age 49. He had requested that any memorial contributions be made to Starcross, a community for children with AIDS, at 34500 Annapolis Road, Annapolis, Calif. 95412.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1995 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Paul Monette, whose written works include an autobiography that traced his tortuous path from the stigmas of homosexuality and a memoir detailing the agonizing AIDS death of his lover--both of which brought him national honors--has died of the disease that dominated his life and his work for more than a decade. Monette, believed to be the first AIDS patient to ever win a National Book Award, was 49.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1994 | AL MARTINEZ
Paul Monette's garden wears a winter face, with the leaves of a Chinese elm tree scattered about the patio and the bloomless rhododendron bushes oddly lackluster beneath an overcast December sky. Only a brilliantly red poinsettia, placed carefully in the center of a small table, adds a flash of color to the small back yard, but that's an intrusion. Hothouse plants don't belong here.
BOOKS
June 26, 1994 | Lawrence Chua, Lawrence Chua is the managing editor of BOMB Magazine and a founding member of the black radio collective, Radio Bandung
Depending on who is remembering the event, it was a black lesbian or a Latin drag queen who hurled the first bottle that summer night. The particulars of the rioting that followed the 1969 police raid on a New York gay bar called Stonewall have since lapsed into the convenient shadows of legend.
NEWS
October 4, 1994 | HILLARY JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two hundred lucky guests got tickets--more than that were turned away--when the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation held a benefit celebration of local author Paul Monette on Saturday at the Mt. Olympus home of Dr. Peter Kraus. A dozen noted authors, playwrights, actors and others read selections from Monette's work and from their own. The portrait of Monette that emerged during the evening was of a writer capable of wry humor and clear-eyed heroism.
BOOKS
June 26, 1994 | Lawrence Chua, Lawrence Chua is the managing editor of BOMB Magazine and a founding member of the black radio collective, Radio Bandung
Depending on who is remembering the event, it was a black lesbian or a Latin drag queen who hurled the first bottle that summer night. The particulars of the rioting that followed the 1969 police raid on a New York gay bar called Stonewall have since lapsed into the convenient shadows of legend.
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