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December 12, 1999 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, F. Kathleen Foley is a regular theater reviewer for daily Calendar
In May 1946, Louis Slotin, a Canadian physicist working at Los Alamos, N.M., set out to "tickle the dragon's tail"--a risky but routine experiment he had performed dozens of times before. Inserting a simple screwdriver into the critical assembly--a tabletop apparatus used to boost and study fission for military applications--Slotin slowly lowered its reflective upper shell closer to the plutonium core, while a roomful of interested scientists looked on.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2003 | David C. Nichols
Corporate ethics collide with history in "The Good Ship Manhattan," receiving its world premiere at 2100 Square Feet. Paul Mullin's dramedy contrasts boardroom ruthlessness with larger global terrors. It begins almost ritually on Gary Smoot's striking abstraction of a high-rise, with hanging strings for walls. As Tim Labor's sound effects provide urban atmosphere, each character delivers dialogue destined to reappear at essential moments.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2003 | David C. Nichols
Corporate ethics collide with history in "The Good Ship Manhattan," receiving its world premiere at 2100 Square Feet. Paul Mullin's dramedy contrasts boardroom ruthlessness with larger global terrors. It begins almost ritually on Gary Smoot's striking abstraction of a high-rise, with hanging strings for walls. As Tim Labor's sound effects provide urban atmosphere, each character delivers dialogue destined to reappear at essential moments.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1999 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, F. Kathleen Foley is a regular theater reviewer for daily Calendar
In May 1946, Louis Slotin, a Canadian physicist working at Los Alamos, N.M., set out to "tickle the dragon's tail"--a risky but routine experiment he had performed dozens of times before. Inserting a simple screwdriver into the critical assembly--a tabletop apparatus used to boost and study fission for military applications--Slotin slowly lowered its reflective upper shell closer to the plutonium core, while a roomful of interested scientists looked on.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1999
Re F. Kathleen Foley's article on Paul Mullin's play "Louis Slotin Sonata" ("No Mere Slip of the Wrist," Dec. 12): I was one of the writers and associate producer on the documentary film "Tickling the Dragon's Tail: The Story of Louis Slotin," which ran on Global Television in Canada earlier this year. The film, which was nominated for a Gemini Award (the Canadian television awards), was produced by Great North Productions Inc. in Edmonton and was directed by Tom Radford, who was also principal writer.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1999 | DON SHIRLEY, Don Shirley is The Times' theater writer
In alphabetical order: "Bitter Women," Cast Theatre. Lisa James' staging of Justin Tanner's Silver Lake singles comedy was as funny and heartfelt as the author's. "Broken Hearts," Cornerstone Theater. This hyper-multiculti company loves L.A. and expresses it with a wry sense of humor. "Cabaret," Wilshire Theatre. Directors Sam Mendes and Rob Marshall transformed a familiar show and a seldom-used theater into theatrical shock waves. "Children," Pacific Resident Theatre.
NEWS
April 18, 2002 | DARYL H. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Left to us by the ancient Egyptians, the Book of the Dead is a collection of prayers and charms meant to help souls navigate the afterworld. Playwright Paul Mullin, who wrote the 1999 hit "Louis Slotin Sonata," has taken that idea and combined it with beliefs about reincarnation and events from American history to come up with "An American Book of the Dead, the Game Show." His intent, presumably, is to guide the living through the responsibilities of being American. Or maybe not.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
The Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle succumbed to "Reefer Madness!" Monday, awarding the little musical seven of the circle's annual awards--more than twice the number won by any other show. "Reefer" won in seven of the eight categories for which it was nominated. It lost only in the writing competition, in which its libretto was nominated--although the music and lyrics by the same two writers, Kevin Murphy and Dan Studney, did win in the category for outstanding score.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1999 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Paul Mullin's "Louis Slotin Sonata," presented by the Circle X Theatre Company at the Hollywood Court, is a rare bird--a new play that wraps intellectual complexity, emotional depth and theatrical derring-do into one tight and memorable package.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2000 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, F. Kathleen Foley is a regular theater reviewer for daily Calendar
Some days the folks at the Circle X Theatre Company must feel like the sailors aboard "The Flying Dutchman." The valiant creative collective has circled the Los Angeles theater scene endlessly in search of salvation--a permanent venue to call its own. That port in a storm has been hard to come by. However, these wanderers are clearly not operating under a curse. Established in 1996, Circle X has generated waves of excitement on the L.A. theater scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2008 | David Ng; Daryl H. Miller; Philip Brandes
Paul Mullin's "The Sequence," currently at The Theatre @ Boston Court, chronicles the race between two scientists to map the human genome. Drawn from real-world events, this flashy and ambitious new play spotlights an important scientific breakthrough but comes up more than a few chromosomes short of a coherent drama. "The Sequence" is told through the eyes of an eager journalist (Karri Krause) who befriends the rival scientists as they embark on their research.
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