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January 24, 2006 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
After a year of fractious struggles in public broadcasting over politics and finances, the Public Broadcasting Service turned inward this week for its next leader, selecting a veteran public television station executive known for her diplomatic skills to guide PBS. The PBS board of directors announced Monday that it has selected Paula Kerger, a top executive at New York's Thirteen/WNET, to be the system's next president and CEO.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2012 | By Meredith Blake
When Mitt Romney vowed to cut government funding for the Public Broadcasting Service during Wednesday night's presidential debate, network chief Paula Kerger says she “just about fell off the sofa” out of shock. Romney's remarks - and in particular his decision to single out the beloved Big Bird -- sparked an immediate uproar on social media . And on Thursday, PBS issued an unusually strongly worded statement in response to the attack. “Governor Romney does not understand the value the American people place on public broadcasting and the outstanding return on investment the system delivers to our nation,” it read.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2007 | Lynn Smith
After a year on the hot seat as president and chief executive of the Public Broadcasting Service, Paula Kerger admitted this week that she was "still trembling" as she answered questions from reporters and critics. She had this to say about the network's most controversial issues: * Ken Burns' much-anticipated 14- or 15-hour (or 14 1/2 -hour) documentary, "The War," is still being edited, but it will have three new stories from the Latino and Native American perspectives woven through it.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2007 | Lynn Smith
After a year on the hot seat as president and chief executive of the Public Broadcasting Service, Paula Kerger admitted this week that she was "still trembling" as she answered questions from reporters and critics. She had this to say about the network's most controversial issues: * Ken Burns' much-anticipated 14- or 15-hour (or 14 1/2 -hour) documentary, "The War," is still being edited, but it will have three new stories from the Latino and Native American perspectives woven through it.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2012 | By Meredith Blake
When Mitt Romney vowed to cut government funding for the Public Broadcasting Service during Wednesday night's presidential debate, network chief Paula Kerger says she “just about fell off the sofa” out of shock. Romney's remarks - and in particular his decision to single out the beloved Big Bird -- sparked an immediate uproar on social media . And on Thursday, PBS issued an unusually strongly worded statement in response to the attack. “Governor Romney does not understand the value the American people place on public broadcasting and the outstanding return on investment the system delivers to our nation,” it read.
NEWS
July 27, 2006 | Matea Gold
PBS President Paula Kerger said Wednesday that she agreed with the decision by the PBS Kids Sprout network to fire the host of a children's program who had appeared in videos that mocked public service announcements touting sexual abstinence.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2012 | By Joy Press
At the Television Critics Assn. press tour in Pasadena on Saturday, PBS President Paula Kerger addressed the decision to fire Fred Willard from the new show “Market Warriors” after his indecency arrest in Los Angeles last week. “We realized we needed to work fast because we are taping now,” she said, noting that PBS didn't want Willard to “become a distraction.” “We talked to [Willard], and decided what we would do was bring in Mark Wahlberg,” host of “Antiques Roadshow,” the long-running PBS series for which “Market Warriors” was intended as a kind of companion.  The new series will premiere on Monday with Wahlberg's voice in the place of Willard's.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2013
The chief of PBS has a message for "Downton Abbey" fans: I'm not trying to make your life miserable with spoilers. "We're not punishing our viewers," PBS President and Chief Executive Paula Kerger reassured reporters Monday morning at the Television Critics Assn. TV press tour in Pasadena. The problem is that PBS runs episodes of the smash British costume drama weeks after they have aired in the U.K. That means that American fans often find spoilers online that prematurely reveal important plot twists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
George Page, 71, creator and host of the long-running PBS series "Nature," died Wednesday from cancer at his home in Equinunk, Pa. "Nature" debuted in 1982 and has consistently been one of public television's highest-rated shows. The Emmy and Peabody Award-winning series will begin its 25th season this fall. Page narrated every episode of "Nature," nearly 300 overall, until retiring from television because of illness in 1998.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2007 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
PBS has awarded documentary filmmaker Ken Burns an unprecedented 15-year contract to continue providing public television stations with his signature films on American history. "What that represents is an extraordinary commitment from Ken that signals he plans to spend the rest of his professional life working with public television," said PBS President and Chief Executive Paula Kerger in an announcement Saturday to the semiannual gathering of the Television Critics Assn. in Pasadena.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2006 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
After a year of fractious struggles in public broadcasting over politics and finances, the Public Broadcasting Service turned inward this week for its next leader, selecting a veteran public television station executive known for her diplomatic skills to guide PBS. The PBS board of directors announced Monday that it has selected Paula Kerger, a top executive at New York's Thirteen/WNET, to be the system's next president and CEO.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2010 | By Scott Collins, Los Angeles Times
Everywhere Tavis Smiley travels around Southern California these days, people stop him with concerned expressions on their faces. He says they wonder about his nightly talk show and blow off some steam about KCET-TV Channel 28, the major Los Angeles PBS outlet for 40 years and Smiley's home studio for the last seven, which is exiting the public-broadcasting network just five weeks from now. "If the viewer in Southern California, if the viewer in...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2010 | By Melissa Maerz and Scott Collins, Los Angeles Times
In 1996, when Al Jerome first signed on as the president of KCET-TV, the PBS affiliate in Los Angeles, he had grand plans for the station. A longtime commercial broadcaster and former NBC executive, hired at a time when a trio of East Coast stations dominated the market, he wanted to generate more national programming and give the station a national profile. "It was very important to me to try to make a bigger mark inside the system and produce more for PBS," he said. Jerome never did. He was not the first head of KCET who ultimately failed to vault the local PBS affiliate into the upper echelons of the PBS network, but he will almost certainly be the last.
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